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In the United States proven oil reserves—the amount of oil considered

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In the United States proven oil reserves—the amount of oil considered  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 21 Sep 2017, 08:05
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In the United States proven oil reserves—the amount of oil considered extractable from known fields—are at the same level as they were ten years ago. Yet over this same period no new oil fields of any consequence have been discovered, and the annual consumption of domestically produced oil has increased.

Which one of the following, if true, best reconciles the discrepancy described above?

(A) Over the past decade the annual consumption of imported oil has increased more rapidly than that of domestic oil in the United States.
(B) Conservation measures have lowered the rate of growth of domestic oil consumption from what it was a decade ago.
(C) Oil exploration in the United States has slowed due to increased concern over the environmental impact of such exploration.
(D) The price of domestically produced oil has fallen substantially over the past decade.
(E) Due to technological advances over the last decade, much oil previously considered unextractable is now considered extractable.

Source: LSAT

i chose A but OA is E. i don't think E can really be the reason why consumption increased but A explained it directly.
can someone help please.

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Originally posted by YangYichen on 09 Dec 2016, 18:47.
Last edited by broall on 21 Sep 2017, 08:05, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: In the United States proven oil reserves—the amount of oil considered  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Dec 2016, 20:07
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YangYichen wrote:
In the United States proven oil reserves—the amount of oil considered extractable from known fields—are at the same level as they were ten years ago.Yet over this same period no new oil fields of any consequence have been discovered, and the annual consumption of domestically produced oil has increased.
Which one of the following, if true, best reconciles the discrepancy described above?
(A) Over the past decade the annual consumption of imported oil has increased more rapidly than that of domestic oil in the United States.
(B) Conservation measures have lowered the rate of growth of domestic oil consumption from what it was a decade ago.
(C) Oil exploration in the United States has slowed due to increased concern over the environmental impact of such exploration.
(D) The price of domestically produced oil has fallen substantially over the past decade.
(E) Due to technological advances over the last decade, much oil previously considered unextractable is now considered extractable.
i chose A but OA is E. i don't think E can really be the reason why consumption increased but A explained it directly.
can someone help please.


Hi
A is ruled out because of the coloured portion
Quote:
Yet over this same period no new oil fields of any consequence have been discovered, and the annual consumption of domestically produced oil has increased.


The statement above itself says domestic oil consumption has increased.
A just says that consumption of imported oil has increased more rapidly, but the fact remains that domestic oil consumption too has increased.
So A can be ruled out..

Now E tells us that the new methods have found new oil in the existing oil fields.
This reconciles the fact that even with more consumption and no new fields found, the oil reserves remain the same
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Re: In the United States proven oil reserves—the amount of oil considered  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Dec 2016, 20:34
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chetan2u u go straight to the heart of my problem
i got u point thx a lot!
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Re: In the United States proven oil reserves—the amount of oil considered  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 25 Jan 2017, 04:08
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In the United States proven oil reserves—the amount of oil considered extractable from known fields—are at the same level as they were ten years ago. Yet over this same period no new oil fields of any consequence have been discovered, and the annual consumption of domestically produced oil has increased.

Which one of the following, if true, best reconciles the discrepancy described above?

(A) Over the past decade the annual consumption of imported oil has increased more rapidly than that of domestic oil in the United States.
(B) Conservation measures have lowered the rate of growth of domestic oil consumption from what it was a decade ago.
(C) Oil exploration in the United States has slowed due to increased concern over the environmental impact of such exploration.
(D) The price of domestically produced oil has fallen substantially over the past decade.
(E) Due to technological advances over the last decade, much oil previously considered unextractable is now considered extractable.

Originally posted by Nahid078 on 24 Jan 2017, 22:08.
Last edited by carcass on 25 Jan 2017, 04:08, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: In the United States proven oil reserves—the amount of oil considered  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jan 2017, 07:56
Hi,
I was hesitating between A and E and wrongly chose A

So why A is wrong?? I think maybe because the consumption of imported oil may be not correlated with the consumption of domestic oil and therefore the amount of oil extractable muss decrease -> Not resolve the paradox
But I am not sure of this assumption to make this statement wrong, if anyone could help me..
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Re: In the United States proven oil reserves—the amount of oil considered  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jan 2017, 11:13
Nahid078 wrote:
In the United States proven oil reserves—the amount of oil considered extractable from known fields—are at the same level as they were ten years ago. Yet over this same period no new oil fields of any consequence have been discovered, and the annual consumption of domestically produced oil has increased.

Which one of the following, if true, best reconciles the discrepancy described above?

(A) Over the past decade the annual consumption of imported oil has increased more rapidly than that of domestic oil in the United States.
(B) Conservation measures have lowered the rate of growth of domestic oil consumption from what it was a decade ago.
(C) Oil exploration in the United States has slowed due to increased concern over the environmental impact of such exploration.
(D) The price of domestically produced oil has fallen substantially over the past decade.
(E) Due to technological advances over the last decade, much oil previously considered unextractable is now considered extractable.



I also went for A..but later saw that argument is telling about "domestically produced oil".....missing one word and u fell in the GMAT trap.......
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Re: In the United States proven oil reserves—the amount of oil considered  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jan 2017, 04:35
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Simplify the argument given -

1. the annual consumption of domestically produced oil has increased.
2. No new fields have been discovered.

However,
the amount of oil considered extractable from known fields is at the same level

We need to explain the last statement.

A - Incorrect.
Not relevant because we know from point #1 that the consumption of domestically produced oil has increased.

B - Incorrect.
Okay. But still we know that the consumption of domestically produced oil has increased. Hence, logically, the amount of oil considered extractable must reduce.

C - Incorrect.
Does not add any new information as we already know that no new fields of consequence have been discovered.
Hence, this does not explain the why amount of oil considered extractable is at the same level.

D - Incorrect.
Reduction in price --> leads to more consumption --> worsens the paradox

E - Correct answer.
this explains why even though the consumption of oil has increased, there has been no decline in the amount of oil considered extractable. Because oil that wasn't earlier considered extractable is now extractable.
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Re: In the United States proven oil reserves—the amount of oil considered  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jun 2017, 09:35
A is not the right answer because higher increasing does not mean the higher consumption of imported oil.
In addition, the word "domestic oil" is unclear and tricky -> A should be avoided.
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New post 02 Mar 2018, 09:01
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[quote="YangYichen"]In the United States proven oil reserves—the amount of oil considered extractable from known fields—are at the same level as they were ten years ago. Yet over this same period no new oil fields of any consequence have been discovered, and the annual consumption of domestically produced oil has increased.

Which one of the following, if true, best reconciles the discrepancy described above?

(A) Over the past decade the annual consumption of imported oil has increased more rapidly than that of domestic oil in the United States.
(B) Conservation measures have lowered the rate of growth of domestic oil consumption from what it was a decade ago.
(C) Oil exploration in the United States has slowed due to increased concern over the environmental impact of such exploration.
(D) The price of domestically produced oil has fallen substantially over the past decade.
(E) Due to technological advances over the last decade, much oil previously considered unextractable is now considered extractable.

Source: LSAT

(A) Over the past decade the annual consumption of imported oil has increased more rapidly than that of domestic oil in the United States. This simply states that the consumption of imported oil has increased more rapidly than that of domestic oil. This also means that the consumption of domestic oil has increased (not more than imported oil but has increased definitely). If this is the case we expect the level to be lower than what it was a decade ago
(B) Conservation measures have lowered the rate of growth of domestic oil consumption from what it was a decade ago. Again, it says conservation measures have lowered the rate of growth of domestic oil consumption. This also means that there has been some consumption of the oil. If that is the case, we expect the oil level to be lower than what it was a decade ago
(C) Oil exploration in the United States has slowed due to increased concern over the environmental impact of such exploration. Again, oil exploration in the United States has slowed not stopped. So we expect the level of oil to be lower than what it was 10 years ago
(D) The price of domestically produced oil has fallen substantially over the past decade. Opposite to what we want. If the price has fallen, we expect the consumption to increase
(E) Due to technological advances over the last decade, much oil previously considered unextractable is now considered extractable. Here we are given something different. If oil previously considered unextractable is now considered extractable, then the extra oil that is obtain is what was used in the past 10 years.
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In the United States proven oil reserves—the amount of oil considered  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jul 2018, 17:11
GMATNinja VeritasPrepKarishma nightblade354 pikolo2510 generis

Why is (D) an opposite answer?

Quote:
In the United States proven oil reserves—the amount of oil considered extractable from known fields—are at the same level as they were ten years ago. Yet over this same period no new oil fields of any consequence have been discovered, and the annual consumption of domestically produced oil has increased.


If same volume of oil is available for extraction, and if no additional oil fields
are discovered, how could yearly consumption of domestically produced oil increase?

Quote:
(D) The price of domestically produced oil has fallen substantially over the past decade.

If price falls, more people will be able to buy the oil now and hence the consumption shall increase.
Is not this the explanation we are looking for?
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In the United States proven oil reserves—the amount of oil considered  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jul 2018, 19:19
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adkikani wrote:
GMATNinja VeritasPrepKarishma nightblade354 pikolo2510 generis

Why is (D) an opposite answer?
Quote:
In the United States proven oil reserves—the amount of oil considered extractable from known fields—are at the same level as they were ten years ago. Yet over this same period no new oil fields of any consequence have been discovered, and the annual consumption of domestically produced oil has increased.

If same volume of oil is available for extraction, and if no additional oil fields
are discovered, how could yearly consumption of domestically produced oil increase?
Quote:
(D) The price of domestically produced oil has fallen substantially over the past decade.

If price falls, more people will be able to buy the oil now and hence the consumption shall increase.
Is not this the explanation we are looking for?

adkikani , You wrote:

If same volume of oil is available for extraction, and if no additional oil fields
are discovered, how could yearly consumption of domestically produced oil

. . . HAVE INCREASED without a simultaneous decrease in available oil levels [my words]?

Whoops. You are answering the wrong question. We do not need to explain the increase in consumption.

We need to explain this apparent paradox: increased consumption of oil should have decreased oil reserve levels. Oil reserve levels did not drop.

How can we consume more oil, but have the same amount of oil in reserve? That discrepancy needs to be explained.

I am not sure what went wrong.

Why is the "same volume of oil" available for extraction? There should be LESS.

Option D does not explain the disparity. Option D probably makes things worse.

1) A price drop does not explain the seeming contradiction between escalated consumption and oil reserves whose levels stayed the same although no new oil fields were discovered.

A lower price cannot explain how available reserve levels can be the same as 10 years ago. Price changes do not create more extractable oil.

2) Option D makes things worse.
If anything -- you are correct about this part -- decreased price equals increased consumption . . .

But a greater increase in consumption should FURTHER decrease reserve levels.
A price drop makes the discrepancy worse (harder to explain).

Increased consumption ... no new oil fields ... but proven oil reserve levels have not dropped? Have stayed the same?

Which answer explains this seeming paradox?

(E) Due to technological advances over the last decade, much oil previously considered unextractable is now considered extractable.

The same fields with the same oil have been altered; technology made the fields able to produce more oil.
That increased production compensated for, or offset, the increase in consumption.

This language is the key to the whole question: "proven oil reserves—the amount of oil considered extractable from known fields . . ."
When LSAC people write definitions that seem incidental or ancillary, pay very close attention to the language.
LSAC folks get specific with language for a reason.
In this case, the reason was to give us a BIG HINT about how to reconcile what seemed like contradictory events.
"Extractability" is the only part of the contradiction that has "give" (that has flexibility, that contains the potential for change).

Hope that helps.
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