It is currently 24 Feb 2018, 10:17

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not o

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

1 KUDOS received
Senior SC Moderator
User avatar
D
Joined: 14 Nov 2016
Posts: 1277
Location: Malaysia
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member CAT Tests
Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not o [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Mar 2017, 19:54
1
This post received
KUDOS
5
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  35% (medium)

Question Stats:

67% (00:51) correct 33% (00:52) wrong based on 283 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not only about the law but also rules of procedure.

A. Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not only about the law but also
B. That lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not only about the law but also about
C. That lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is not only true about the law but also about
D. Lower courts generally accept not only what the higher courts say is true about the law but also about
E. Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say not only is true about the law but also
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

_________________

"Be challenged at EVERY MOMENT."

“Strength doesn’t come from what you can do. It comes from overcoming the things you once thought you couldn’t.”

"Each stage of the journey is crucial to attaining new heights of knowledge."

Rules for posting in verbal forum | Please DO NOT post short answer in your post!

Intern
Intern
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Aug 2016
Posts: 8
Location: India
Reviews Badge
Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not o [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Mar 2017, 23:07
The correct sentence structure should be--> Not only X but also Y

Option A-- Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not only about the law but also about
the missing about is what makes option A wrong

Option B-- Satisfies the above rule
Manager
Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 14 Mar 2011
Posts: 147
GMAT 1: 760 Q50 V42
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not o [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Mar 2017, 03:56
EnglishCream wrote:
What's wrong with A except Parallelism error?

A has two working verbs without a connector [ I am not aware of its technical name, some define it as a run on sentence, but I am not sure]
Lower courts generally accept [what the higher courts say] is true not only about the law but also rules of procedure.
With "that" in B, we are using a noun clause acting as a subject, as below...
Terabyte wrote:
Why this sentence is beginning from That?

Its noun clause - That the GMAT is tough cannot be denied.
Here, "That the GMAT is tough" is a noun clause, clause that act as a noun.
kunalsingh1991 wrote:
unable to understand the error in option A

Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not only about the law but also rules of procedure.
the first part is a prepositional phrase, while the second is a noun. Another reason to Eliminate A
_________________

If you find my posts/replies helpful, please take a moment to click on the "kudos" icon.

Top Contributor
1 KUDOS received
Retired Moderator
User avatar
P
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4327
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not o [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Mar 2017, 07:23
1
This post received
KUDOS
Top Contributor
Sentence fragmentation: When there are two verbs in a clause, each of them does need a subject of its own and further both the parts have to be conjugated properly. In some cases, we may miss the subject if the subject of the first part can legitimately act as the subject of the second arm too, in which case the subject is said to be elided. However, in A, while the first subject is the "lower courts" with a genuine verb "accept", the lower courts cannot act as the subject of the second arm any meaningfully. Hence, A is essentially a fragment per se.
The easiest way of rectifying this error is to break up the clause into two and provide an appropriate subject for the second part. However, B is also one such licit method by which we convert the entire first part as noun clause started by a relative pronoun "that" and render 'is' as the true verb. That is the reason B is the better choice. We can discount A, D and E on this faulty sentence structure alone. Of course, between B and C, the correlative conjunction parallelism is perfect in B, while the same is flawed in C.
_________________

Can you solve at least some SC questions without delving into the initial statement?

Narendran 98845 44509

1 KUDOS received
VP
VP
User avatar
V
Joined: 15 Jul 2015
Posts: 1286
Location: India
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V51
GRE 1: 339 Q170 V169
Re: Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not o [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Mar 2017, 08:17
1
This post received
KUDOS
godot53 wrote:
A has two working verbs without a connector [ I am not aware of its technical name, some define it as a run on sentence, but I am not sure]
Lower courts generally accept [what the higher courts say] is true not only about the law but also rules of procedure.
Great explanation. About option A: I'm not sure what you mean by a "working" verb, but the first option does not have the error that I think you think it has ( :)), at least not necessarily. It depends on whether you view the the higher courts say bit as being the main element introduced by the what. For example:

We are dealing with what some economists say is the result of structural problems.

Here the what... problems bit (the entire thing) is what we are dealing with. Reading option A that way will lead to a difference in meaning though.
_________________

Ascore Prep | Bangalore

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 04 Sep 2015
Posts: 479
Location: India
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not o [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Mar 2017, 16:16
Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not only about the law but also rules of procedure.

A. Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not only about the law but also
B. That lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not only about the law but also about
C. That lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is not only true about the law but also about
D. Lower courts generally accept not only what the higher courts say is true about the law but also about
E. Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say not only is true about the law but also

Parallelism marker: Not only... but also...

Now in parallelism the elements of the list should be same in means of not only comparison but the structure also.

in the sentence A the ' not only about the law but also rules of procedure'. ther should be a 'about' after but also.

Option B corrects that error. and is the correct answer for this question.
Manager
Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 14 Mar 2011
Posts: 147
GMAT 1: 760 Q50 V42
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not o [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Mar 2017, 01:33
AjiteshArun wrote:
About option A: I'm not sure what you mean by a "working" verb, but the first option does not have the error that I think you think it has ( :)), at least not necessarily. It depends on whether you view the the higher courts say bit as being the main element introduced by the what. For example:

We are dealing with what some economists say is the result of structural problems.

Here the what... problems bit (the entire thing) is what we are dealing with.

What I mean by working verb is a verb carrying tense. Sorry, may be I used the wrong term for it. I should have used the term "finite verb".
Ok, So "say" is a noun here ? Something like, Jim does have his say in XXXX

AjiteshArun wrote:
Reading option A that way will lead to a difference in meaning though.

I very much got this essence, considering "say" as a noun and as a verb, as discussed above.

Awesome discussion !! :-D Thank you very much.
_________________

If you find my posts/replies helpful, please take a moment to click on the "kudos" icon.

1 KUDOS received
VP
VP
User avatar
V
Joined: 15 Jul 2015
Posts: 1286
Location: India
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V51
GRE 1: 339 Q170 V169
Re: Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not o [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Mar 2017, 08:28
1
This post received
KUDOS
godot53 wrote:
Ok, So "say" is a noun here ? Something like, Jim does have his say in XXXX
No, say is not a noun in the original sentence. It's just that it's not necessary for that portion to be what the what is really introducing. Perhaps the what is actually followed by is, and the the higher courts say portion is not important. I found a sentence very similar to mine in the WSJ:

But these reforms have been financed by what some economists say is a dangerous rise in government debt issuance...

This is meant to be read as:

But these reforms have been financed by what some economists say is a dangerous rise in government debt issuance...
_________________

Ascore Prep | Bangalore

Manager
Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 14 Mar 2011
Posts: 147
GMAT 1: 760 Q50 V42
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not o [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Mar 2017, 02:41
AjiteshArun wrote:
But these reforms have been financed by what some economists say is a dangerous rise in government debt issuance...

This is meant to be read as:

But these reforms have been financed by what some economists say is a dangerous rise in government debt issuance...


I understand your point - "some economist say" is acting as some kind of modifier.
But, at the same time, I am really confused how can this type of structure work ? Because, we are using a clause without any so called "connector" (conjunction, Subordinators, and so on).
Have you seen any official problems using this same kind of construction?

Thank you very much.
_________________

If you find my posts/replies helpful, please take a moment to click on the "kudos" icon.

Senior SC Moderator
User avatar
D
Joined: 14 Nov 2016
Posts: 1277
Location: Malaysia
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not o [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Mar 2017, 22:10
ziyuen wrote:
Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not only about the law but also rules of procedure.

A. Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not only about the law but also
B. That lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not only about the law but also about
C. That lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is not only true about the law but also about
D. Lower courts generally accept not only what the higher courts say is true about the law but also about
E. Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say not only is true about the law but also


OFFICIAL SOLUTION



When you see a "not only...but also" construction (or a "both...and" or "either...or"), you should immediately seize on the fact that the two components of that construction must be parallel. One helpful trick for rooting out choices that are not parallel is to read the sentence without everything from "not only" through "but also" to see whether what remains is a complete, coherent thought. If it is not, then you know that the construction is not parallel. For example, if you did that with choice A you would have:

A) Lower courts generally accept what higher courts say is true...rules of procedure.
Since this is not a coherent sentence, A is incorrect. If you perform that on B (the correct answer), you will have:

B) That lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true about rules of procedure.

This is a complete thought (more on why, if you didn't see that at first, in a minute), so you cannot eliminate B for parallelism.
Choices C, D, and E each an error when held to that standard:

C: That lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is about rules pf procedure.
D: Lower courts generally accept about legal rules of procedure.
E: Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say rules of procedure.

Regarding correct choice B: the testmaker here uses an interesting sentence structure that may at first sound incorrect. Your ear may very well want to hear that the lower courts accept what the higher courts say is true (about both the law and rules of procedure). But what the sentence actually says in B is lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say, a fact that is true about both the law and rules of procedure. It's a sentence structure akin to "That it is raining is true in both New York and Boston." Note that the GMAT testmaker likes to find sentences that are correct but also interestingly structured, rewarding those who can unpack a strange sentence to determine what it really says.
_________________

"Be challenged at EVERY MOMENT."

“Strength doesn’t come from what you can do. It comes from overcoming the things you once thought you couldn’t.”

"Each stage of the journey is crucial to attaining new heights of knowledge."

Rules for posting in verbal forum | Please DO NOT post short answer in your post!

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 26 Dec 2016
Posts: 27
Re: Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not o [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Jan 2018, 11:18
hazelnut wrote:
ziyuen wrote:
Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not only about the law but also rules of procedure.

A. Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not only about the law but also
B. That lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not only about the law but also about
C. That lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is not only true about the law but also about
D. Lower courts generally accept not only what the higher courts say is true about the law but also about
E. Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say not only is true about the law but also


OFFICIAL SOLUTION



When you see a "not only...but also" construction (or a "both...and" or "either...or"), you should immediately seize on the fact that the two components of that construction must be parallel. One helpful trick for rooting out choices that are not parallel is to read the sentence without everything from "not only" through "but also" to see whether what remains is a complete, coherent thought. If it is not, then you know that the construction is not parallel. For example, if you did that with choice A you would have:

A) Lower courts generally accept what higher courts say is true...rules of procedure.
Since this is not a coherent sentence, A is incorrect. If you perform that on B (the correct answer), you will have:

B) That lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true about rules of procedure.

This is a complete thought (more on why, if you didn't see that at first, in a minute), so you cannot eliminate B for parallelism.
Choices C, D, and E each an error when held to that standard:

C: That lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is about rules pf procedure.
D: Lower courts generally accept about legal rules of procedure.
E: Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say rules of procedure.

Regarding correct choice B: the testmaker here uses an interesting sentence structure that may at first sound incorrect. Your ear may very well want to hear that the lower courts accept what the higher courts say is true (about both the law and rules of procedure). But what the sentence actually says in B is lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say, a fact that is true about both the law and rules of procedure. It's a sentence structure akin to "That it is raining is true in both New York and Boston." Note that the GMAT testmaker likes to find sentences that are correct but also interestingly structured, rewarding those who can unpack a strange sentence to determine what it really says.


I'm still not clear on the role "that" plays at the beginning of the sentence. Can someone please clarify as to why that's correct?
Re: Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not o   [#permalink] 16 Jan 2018, 11:18
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Lower courts generally accept what the higher courts say is true not o

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.