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Many of today’s mathematicians use computers to test cases that are ei

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Re: Many of today’s mathematicians use computers to test cases that are ei  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Apr 2016, 14:54
Could someone please explain/validate the usage of "this" in independent clauses following a semi-colon? I've seen examples where "this" is ok.. confused. Are such examples wrong?
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Re: Many of today’s mathematicians use computers to test cases that are ei  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Apr 2016, 02:20
1
dina98 wrote:
Could someone please explain/validate the usage of "this" in independent clauses following a semi-colon? I've seen examples where "this" is ok.. confused. Are such examples wrong?


this, that, these, and those can act as demonstrative adjectives or demonstrative pronoun.They are called demonstrative as they indicate the location of something.

On GMAT, the use of demonstrative adjectives is fine. For example.

This pen is mine and that one is yours.

Notice that in this sentence this and that are adjectives of nouns pen and one respectively.

The following use of demonstrative pronouns is almost always wrong on GMAT:

This is my pen.
That is good shot.

Here this and that are subject pronouns. Here, this and that are too ambiguous. You can not really relate to the location of the object/thing unless you are actually looking at it.

Demonstrative pronouns when used to indicate the copy of nouns in comparisons is also correct on GMAT. For example:

The population of India is greater than that of US.

Here that refers to population.
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Re: Many of today’s mathematicians use computers to test cases that are ei  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Aug 2016, 16:02
I agree with the OA. However, given that the OG repeatedly marks as incorrect the sentences with an unclear antecedent, for me C was out in a second.

I chose to ignore the semi-colon problem in B. I hope I don't get a question like this in the exam!
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Re: Many of today’s mathematicians use computers to test cases that are ei  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 11 Jul 2017, 22:40
Many of today’s mathematicians use computers to test cases that are either too time-consuming or involve too many variables to test manually, allowing the exploration of theoretical issues that were impossible to test a generation ago

a) are either too time-consuming or involve too many variables to test manually, allowing the exploration of

b) either take too much time or involve too many variables to be tested manually; allowing the mathematicians to explore

c) would either take too much time or involve too many variables to test manually, allowing them to explore

d) would either be too time-consuming or would involve too many variables to test manually; this capability allows the mathematicians to explore

e) take too much time or variables to test manually; this capability allows the mathematicians to explore
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Originally posted by leanhdung on 05 Jul 2017, 09:11.
Last edited by leanhdung on 11 Jul 2017, 22:40, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Many of today’s mathematicians use computers to test cases that are ei  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2017, 21:01
From all the discussion, nobody has managed to discuss the option C in terms of Pronoun Ambiguity. Could somebody care to explain why "them" is correct?
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Re: Many of today’s mathematicians use computers to test cases that are ei  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2017, 22:39
Rosicky wrote:
From all the discussion, nobody has managed to discuss the option C in terms of Pronoun Ambiguity. Could somebody care to explain why "them" is correct?


There is NO pronoun ambiguity in C. them logically refers to mathematicians.

Can you find any other noun besides mathematicians to which them can logically and grammatically refer?
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Re: Many of today’s mathematicians use computers to test cases that are ei  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2017, 23:38
can someone help how to eliminate D?
Do we need to nitpick parallelism error?
would either...or would...

I feel like there should be stronger reason to reject D.
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Re: Many of today’s mathematicians use computers to test cases that are ei  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jul 2017, 00:41
sevenplusplus wrote:
can someone help how to eliminate D?
Do we need to nitpick parallelism error?
would either...or would...

I feel like there should be stronger reason to reject D.

Hi @sevenplusplus,

There is only one issue with option D: parallelism error.

In option D, the semi-colon starts the whole clause that is related to the preceding clause. This construction is correct.

Just my 2 cents :)

Any other thoughts?

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Re: Many of today’s mathematicians use computers to test cases that are ei  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2017, 16:13
1
Responding (very belatedly) to a PM:
Quote:
Is the usage of them in option C correct since it refers to the possessive "todays's mathematicians"?
Thanks in advance!

I think the "rule" you're referring to is this one: a non-possessive pronoun can't generally refer to a possessive noun on the GMAT. (An astute forum member pointed out an exception to this rule on an official question: https://gmatclub.com/forum/sc-og-208881.html. But it's the only one I've ever seen... so I suppose that we can demote this from a "rule" to "a guideline that usually seems to work." Ugh.)

But even if we're trying to enforce the original "rule", there's no problem with the pronoun here at all. "Them" refers back to "mathematicians", which isn't actually possessive. So you're all good here.

I hope this helps!
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Many of today’s mathematicians use computers to test cases that are ei  [#permalink]

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New post 21 May 2018, 22:39
I was left A and C options. But eliminated because of Would, as it is used with conditional statements.
Please correct me if I am wrong.

egmat Can you please me here?
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Re: Many of today’s mathematicians use computers to test cases that are ei  [#permalink]

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New post 21 May 2018, 22:46
The explanation in the cat said
(C) CORRECT. Take too much time and involve too many variables are properly parallel. The change to the hypothetical form would is acceptable because the sentence indicates that these cases would not be tested if they had to be tested manually. The pronoun them is also acceptable, as it points back to the subject of the first half of the sentence (many of today's mathematicians use computers, allowing them to explore...).


PrakharGMAT wrote:
kinjiGC wrote:
Many of today’s mathematicians use computers to test cases that are either too time-consuming or involve too many variables to test manually, allowing the exploration of theoretical issues that were impossible to test a generation ago

a) are either too time-consuming or involve too many variables to test manually, allowing the exploration of
There is a parallelism issue
Many of today’s mathematicians use computers to test cases are too time-consuming
Many of today’s mathematicians use computers to test cases are involve too many variables to test manually
We need to repeat "are" in both the lines and then you can see the issue - Incorrect



b) either take too much time or involve too many variables to be tested manually; allowing the mathematicians to explore
Allowing is a verbing modifier to join the two clauses and cannot be separated by a semi colon. Either side of Semi colon shouldn't dependent on each other "Structurally" bur should depend on meaning wise. - Incorrect

c) would either take too much time or involve too many variables to test manually, allowing them to explore
Perfect

d) would either be too time-consuming or would involve too many variables to test manually; this capability allows the mathematicians to explore - Extra would

e) take too much time or variables to test manually; this capability allows the mathematicians to explore - Doesn't make sense to me at all



HI GMATify,

I opted for correct option C but I would like to discuss the usage of "WOULD".
I eliminated other options and in the end left with option C.

But other approach would have been we directly eliminate options A,B and E as "Would" is not used.
I hope in this sentence condition is required so "Would" is required...Please correct me if I am wrong.
Can we do this.. :?:

Please assist.

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Re: Many of today’s mathematicians use computers to test cases that are ei  [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2018, 10:04
Many of today’s mathematicians use computers to test cases that are either too time-consuming or involve too many variables to test manually, allowing the exploration of theoretical issues that were impossible to test a generation ago

(A) are either too time-consuming or involve too many variables to test manually, allowing the exploration of
--- somethings are either <something> or <involve too many variable> -- wrong construction.

(B) either take too much time or involve too many variables to be tested manually; allowing the mathematicians to explore
--- We need to use , allowing (to preserve cause and effect relation).

(C) would either take too much time or involve too many variables to test manually, allowing them to explore
--- Correct choice. "Would" here make sense as if the cases are tested using computers they are neither time consuming nor do they involve too many calculations. So kind of hypothetical situation.

(D) would either be too time-consuming or would involve too many variables to test manually; this capability allows the mathematicians to explore
--- We need to use , allowing (to preserve cause and effect relation).

(E) take too much time or variables to test manually; this capability allows the mathematicians to explore
--- issue with either / or
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Many of today’s mathematicians use computers to test cases that are ei  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Aug 2018, 19:26
Hey GMATNinja , GMATNinjaTwo , adkikani , abhimahna

Quote:
would either take too much time or involve too many variables to test manually, allowing them to explore


Although I got this right, I'm confused with the usage of 'verb-ing' at the end of the sentence. Allow me to explain

verb-ing when preceded by a comma can only do two things
1. Presents additional information for the preceding clause
2. Tells the result of the preceding clause
Note: - The verbing should make sense with the subject of the preceding clause

In the given question, the preceding clause is

Quote:
are either too time-consuming or involve too many variables to test manually


With the above information, the noun in the preceding clause 'test cases' doesn't make sense with the verbing 'allowing'. Test cases cannot do the work of 'allow'

Can you let me know where am I going wrong?
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Re: Many of today’s mathematicians use computers to test cases that are ei  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2018, 06:50
pikolo2510 wrote:
Hey GMATNinja , GMATNinjaTwo , adkikani , abhimahna

Quote:
would either take too much time or involve too many variables to test manually, allowing them to explore


Although I got this right, I'm confused with the usage of 'verb-ing' at the end of the sentence. Allow me to explain

verb-ing when preceded by a comma can only do two things
1. Presents additional information for the preceding clause
2. Tells the result of the preceding clause
Note: - The verbing should make sense with the subject of the preceding clause

In the given question, the preceding clause is

Quote:
are either too time-consuming or involve too many variables to test manually


With the above information, the noun in the preceding clause 'test cases' doesn't make sense with the verbing 'allowing'. Test cases cannot do the work of 'allow'

Can you let me know where am I going wrong?

When you see a verb-ing modifier after a clause, the most important thing is to figure out whether that modifier logically describes the preceding clause. There's a pervasive myth that the verb-ing modifier should logically describe the previous subject, and this kind of narrow analysis can get you into a little bit of trouble.

Take a silly example. "The neighbor's dog bit Natalie's pinkie toe, prompting her husband to call an ambulance." This is perfectly fine. (Although let's all agree that Natalie's husband is overreacting here, and this dog has weirdly precise aim. :)) Did the neighbor's dog prompt Natalie's husband to call an ambulance? Not exactly. This isn't Lassie magically telling someone to call for help. But it is 100% true that the fact that the dog bit Natalie -- in other words, the dog's act of biting Natalie -- prompted her husband to make the phone call. In other words, "prompting" logically modifies the preceding clause, even though it doesn't logically modify that clause's subject in isolation.

The same thing is true of the question in this thread. "Mathematicians" is the subject of the first clause. Do mathematicians allow the exploration of difficult theoretical issues? Not exactly. But does the fact that "mathematicians use computers to test tough cases" allow the exploration of difficult theoretical issues? You bet it does. So the "verb-ing" usage is just fine here, even though it doesn't modify ONLY the subject.

I hope that helps!
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