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Prospecting for gold during the California gold rush was a relatively

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Prospecting for gold during the California gold rush was a relatively  [#permalink]

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New post 17 May 2018, 05:44
pikolo2510 wrote:
I really didn't get how option E is correct. According to previous posts, there 3 things parallel in Option E

X = erosion
Y = prehistoric glacier movement
Z = ancient

As X and Y are nouns, Z also has to be a noun to be parallel

But here "ancient" is used an adjective. How can this be parallel? I'm really confused with the parallelism here.


Hey pikolo2510 ,

Z in your parallel structure is "ancient, gold-bearing riverbeds thrust to the surface" rather than just ancient. Ancient is an adjective modifying the riverbeds.

Hence, E is correct.

Does that make sense?
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Re: Prospecting for gold during the California gold rush was a relatively  [#permalink]

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New post 17 May 2018, 06:17
abhimahna wrote:
pikolo2510 wrote:
I really didn't get how option E is correct. According to previous posts, there 3 things parallel in Option E

X = erosion
Y = prehistoric glacier movement
Z = ancient

As X and Y are nouns, Z also has to be a noun to be parallel

But here "ancient" is used an adjective. How can this be parallel? I'm really confused with the parallelism here.


Hey pikolo2510 ,

Z in your parallel structure is "ancient, gold-bearing riverbeds" rather than just ancient. Ancient is an adjective modifying the riverbeds.

Hence, E is correct.

Does that make sense?


Hey abhimahna,

Thanks for your reply. But I still have the following doubts

1. If thats the case, why do we have a comma between "ancient" and "gold bearing-riverbeds" . It is confusing to find the parallel structure with the comma.

2. Also, the part after "gold bearing riverbeds" - what is it describing? "Gold bearing riverbeds" OR all the three parallel parts? The comma again confuses what is being modified
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Re: Prospecting for gold during the California gold rush was a relatively  [#permalink]

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New post 17 May 2018, 06:48
2
1
pikolo2510 wrote:
Hey abhimahna,

Thanks for your reply. But I still have the following doubts

1. If thats the case, why do we have a comma between "ancient" and "gold bearing-riverbeds" . It is confusing to find the parallel structure with the comma.

2. Also, the part after "gold bearing riverbeds" - what is it describing? "Gold bearing riverbeds" OR all the three parallel parts? The comma again confuses what is being modified


Hey pikolo2510 ,

I read the sentence again and here is what I found.

We are saying some task is easy because Clause.

Here Clause is "since erosion, prehistoric glacier movement, and ancient, gold-bearing riverbeds thrust to the surface by volcanic activity put gold literally within reach of..."

Now, Look at the Subject and Verb in the clause.

Our Subject is "erosion, prehistoric glacier movement, and ancient, gold-bearing riverbeds thrust to the surface by volcanic activity"

Verb is "put".

Now, if I look at the subject, we have a conjunction "and" and the construction X, Y and Z.

X: erosion
Y: prehistoric glacier movement
Z: ancient, gold-bearing riverbeds thrust to the surface by volcanic activity

All the blue highlighted are actually the point of comparisons and other information is just the modifier.

Now, please note that whenever you are adding too many adjectives to a noun, it is okay to have a comma between those objectives.

So, Our very first adjective is "gold-bearing" and the 2nd adjective is "ancient". Both of these adjectives are referring to the riverbeds thrust.

If you don't put a comma between the two, the adjective "ancient" will act as an adjective of "gold-bearing". So, basically it will act as an adjective of an adjective. But this is not the intended meaning of the sentence. We are not saying Gold bearing was ancient. Rather, we are saying the thrust was ancient. Hence, a comma is very much required here.

Does that make sense?
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Re: Prospecting for gold during the California gold rush was a relatively  [#permalink]

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New post 17 May 2018, 22:37
abhimahna wrote:
pikolo2510 wrote:
Hey abhimahna,

Thanks for your reply. But I still have the following doubts

1. If thats the case, why do we have a comma between "ancient" and "gold bearing-riverbeds" . It is confusing to find the parallel structure with the comma.

2. Also, the part after "gold bearing riverbeds" - what is it describing? "Gold bearing riverbeds" OR all the three parallel parts? The comma again confuses what is being modified


Hey pikolo2510 ,

I read the sentence again and here is what I found.

We are saying some task is easy because Clause.

Here Clause is "since erosion, prehistoric glacier movement, and ancient, gold-bearing riverbeds thrust to the surface by volcanic activity put gold literally within reach of..."

Now, Look at the Subject and Verb in the clause.

Our Subject is "erosion, prehistoric glacier movement, and ancient, gold-bearing riverbeds thrust to the surface by volcanic activity"

Verb is "put".

Now, if I look at the subject, we have a conjunction "and" and the construction X, Y and Z.

X: erosion
Y: prehistoric glacier movement
Z: ancient, gold-bearing riverbeds thrust to the surface by volcanic activity

All the blue highlighted are actually the point of comparisons and other information is just the modifier.

Now, please note that whenever you are adding too many adjectives to a noun, it is okay to have a comma between those objectives.

So, Our very first adjective is "gold-bearing" and the 2nd adjective is "ancient". Both of these adjectives are referring to the riverbeds thrust.

If you don't put a comma between the two, the adjective "ancient" will act as an adjective of "gold-bearing". So, basically it will act as an adjective of an adjective. But this is not the intended meaning of the sentence. We are not saying Gold bearing was ancient. Rather, we are saying the thrust was ancient. Hence, a comma is very much required here.

Does that make sense?


I understood now

Thanks abhimahna for the detailed explanation. Much appreciated
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Re: Prospecting for gold during the California gold rush was a relatively  [#permalink]

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New post 18 May 2018, 10:01
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pikolo2510 wrote:
Hi GMATNinja, GMATNinjaTwo

I really didn't get how option E is correct. According to previous posts, there 3 things parallel in Option E

X = erosion
Y = prehistoric glacier movement
Z = ancient

As X and Y are nouns, Z also has to be a noun to be parallel

But here "ancient" is used an adjective. How can this be parallel? I'm really confused with the parallelism here.

Be careful not to be TOO rigid in your analysis of the parallelism. Consider these two silly sentences:

  • For breakfast, I ate eggs and ham. --> fine, since "eggs" and "ham" are two tasty, parallel nouns
  • For breakfast, I ate eggs and green ham. --> technically, we have "I ate noun and adjective noun", but there's really no problem here: these are two foods (nouns), and we just happened to describe one of them in more detail with an adjective ("green ham")

So look a little bit more closely at Z: it doesn't just say "ancient", it says "ancient, gold-bearing riverbeds." As the ever-wise abhimahna pointed out, "ancient" and "gold-bearing" are just modifiers (specifically adjectives), and the essence is still that we have a noun: "riverbeds." So we're all good on the parallelism.

I hope this helps!
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Re: Prospecting for gold during the California gold rush was a relatively  [#permalink]

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New post 18 May 2018, 11:20
GMATNinja wrote:
pikolo2510 wrote:
Hi GMATNinja, GMATNinjaTwo

I really didn't get how option E is correct. According to previous posts, there 3 things parallel in Option E

X = erosion
Y = prehistoric glacier movement
Z = ancient

As X and Y are nouns, Z also has to be a noun to be parallel

But here "ancient" is used an adjective. How can this be parallel? I'm really confused with the parallelism here.

Be careful not to be TOO rigid in your analysis of the parallelism. Consider these two silly sentences:

  • For breakfast, I ate eggs and ham. --> fine, since "eggs" and "ham" are two tasty, parallel nouns
  • For breakfast, I ate eggs and green ham. --> technically, we have "I ate noun and adjective noun", but there's really no problem here: these are two foods (nouns), and we just happened to describe one of them in more detail with an adjective ("green ham")

So look a little bit more closely at Z: it doesn't just say "ancient", it says "ancient, gold-bearing riverbeds." As the ever-wise abhimahna pointed out, "ancient" and "gold-bearing" are just modifiers (specifically adjectives), and the essence is still that we have a noun: "riverbeds." So we're all good on the parallelism.

I hope this helps!


Thank you for the explanation GMATNinja :-)
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New post 21 Jul 2018, 00:52
Can anyone explain the role of thrust and put in the correct answer choice?
Which one is the main verb between the two ?
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Re: Prospecting for gold during the California gold rush was a relatively  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2018, 20:46
Setback wrote:
Can anyone explain the role of thrust and put in the correct answer choice?
Which one is the main verb between the two ?

What makes this distinction tricky is that “thrust” can function as both a verb and a modifier. Take some silly examples: “Knowing she didn’t have much time to dispose of the evidence, Amy thrust her shovel into the ground with great force and efficiency.” Here “thrust” is a verb – it’s the action Amy is performing.

But “thrust” can also be used as a modifier. “The shovel thrust into the ground broke when it collided with the surprisingly shallow coffin.” Now “thrust” is a modifier describing the shovel. Which shovel? The one thrust into the ground. It’s the presence of the verb “broke” that helps clue us in to the fact that “thrust” plays a different role here.

The OA for this question is more like the second of the two above examples.

Quote:
Erosion, prehistoric glacier movement, and ancient, gold-bearing riverbeds thrust to the surface by volcanic activity put gold literally within reach of

“Thrust” is a modifier describing the riverbeds. Which “riverbeds?” The ones thrust to the surface by volcanic activity.

“Put” is the main verb of the sentence, the action performed by erosion, glacier movement, and those aforementioned riverbeds.

I hope that helps!
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