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RAGCT Day 14: At nearly 38 million dollars, one

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RAGCT Day 14: At nearly 38 million dollars, one  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2014, 11:30
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A
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D
E

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At nearly 38 million dollars, one of the least costly options being considered, the delegate’s proposal was ultimately rejected not only on account of its sizable budget but also on account of its considerable risk.

(A) At nearly 38 million dollars, one of the least costly options being considered, the delegate’s proposal was ultimately rejected not only on account of its sizable budget but also on account of its considerable risk.

(B) Even at nearly 38 million dollars, the delegate’s proposal was among the less costly options being considered; it was ultimately rejected not on account of its sizable budget but on account of its riskiness.

(C) The delegate’s 38-million-dollar proposal, which was ultimately not rejected on account of its sizable budget but on account of its riskiness, had actually been one of the less costly options being considered.

(D) The delegate’s 38-million-dollar proposal, nevertheless among the least costly options being considered, was ultimately not rejected on account of its sizable budget, but its riskiness.

(E) Ultimately rejected due not just to its sizable budget but also to its considerable risk, the delegate’s proposal, even at 38 million dollars, was one of the least costly options under consideration.

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Re: RAGCT Day 14: At nearly 38 million dollars, one  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2014, 12:03
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souvik101990 wrote:
At nearly 38 million dollars, one of the least costly options being considered, the delegate’s proposal was ultimately rejected not only on account of its sizable budget but also on account of its considerable risk.

(A) At nearly 38 million dollars, one of the least costly options being considered, the delegate’s proposal was ultimately rejected not only on account of its sizable budget but also on account of its considerable risk.

(B) Even at nearly 38 million dollars, the delegate’s proposal was among the less costly options being considered; it was ultimately rejected not on account of its sizable budget but on account of its riskiness.

(C) The delegate’s 38-million-dollar proposal, which was ultimately not rejected on account of its sizable budget but on account of its riskiness, had actually been one of the less costly options being considered.

(D) The delegate’s 38-million-dollar proposal, nevertheless among the least costly options being considered, was ultimately not rejected on account of its sizable budget, but its riskiness.

(E) Ultimately rejected due not just to its sizable budget but also to its considerable risk, the delegate’s proposal, even at 38 million dollars, was one of the least costly options under consideration.

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I marked the answer 2 times , changing my answer choice in the second attempt. I must say a very good question indeed. Trick is to eliminate the wrong answer from the 2 seemingly right choices, for example : whether "due to " can have adverbs in between "due and to " , I think i have read somewhere that this is not allowed. But I am not sure.
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Re: RAGCT Day 14: At nearly 38 million dollars, one  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2014, 20:36
A gud ques from a reliable and trusted source, I.e Veritas Prep. Was able to narrow it down to B & C but after that I was pretty not sure , although I marked one along them. Pls someone tell me that in many a lot SC ques I am narrow it down to 2 options with high level of surity but I get confused after this between these 2 options. Pls somebody ( esp this verbal forum moderators) throw some light on this and help me get over my plight , so that even one more member is able to score in the high 700's. :help2 :banana :yes
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Re: RAGCT Day 14: At nearly 38 million dollars, one  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Sep 2014, 00:37
Vinitkhicha1111 wrote:
A gud ques from a reliable and trusted source, I.e Veritas Prep. Was able to narrow it down to B & C but after that I was pretty not sure , although I marked one along them. Pls someone tell me that in many a lot SC ques I am narrow it down to 2 options with high level of surity but I get confused after this between these 2 options. Pls somebody ( esp this verbal forum moderators) throw some light on this and help me get over my plight , so that even one more member is able to score in the high 700's. :help2 :banana :yes



C is wrong for two main reasons: first of all, the sentence lacks of the main verbe. When you have HAD this tense must be paired with the simple past to maintain the parallellism.

You have two actions in the past: the first one is expressed with the simple past, and the second one, which is antecedent to the same, logically comes before the first one.

Secondly: if you cut off the long modifier the sentence loses its meaning; you do have only part of the story that it wants to convey

Hope this helps
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Re: RAGCT Day 14: At nearly 38 million dollars, one  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Sep 2014, 04:57
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Good question! I think this one ultimately comes down to meaning ...

(A) At nearly 38 million dollars, one of the least costly options being considered, the delegate’s proposal was ultimately rejected not only on account of its sizable budget but also on account of its considerable risk. The subject of the sentence should be between the two modifiers. Placing two modifiers in a row makes the sentence feel awkward ... and "out of place". :)

(B) Even at nearly 38 million dollars, the delegate’s proposal was among the less costly options being considered; it was ultimately rejected not on account of its sizable budget but on account of its riskiness.
"less costly" is incorrect. It should be "least" ... And, the second half of the sentence changes the meaning of the author's initial take. There should be two reasons why the plan was rejected, not just one.

(C) The delegate’s 38-million-dollar proposal, which was ultimately not rejected on account of its sizable budget but on account of its riskiness, had actually been one of the less costly options being considered.
this one's incorrect for similar reasons as choice B. less costly ---> should be "least" costly ... And, this version only gives one reason for the plan's rejection.

(D) The delegate’s 38-million-dollar proposal, nevertheless among the least costly options being considered, was ultimately not rejected on account of its sizable budget, but its riskiness.
"nevertheless" is absolutely unnecessary in this sentence, and the second half of the sentence --- like choices B, C --- changes the original meaning.

(E) Ultimately rejected due not just to its sizable budget but also to its considerable risk, the delegate’s proposal, even at 38 million dollars, was one of the least costly options under consideration.
Even though this is not the prettiest of sentences, choice E is correct. At first, the first clause felt a little "clunky" during my initial read; however, the "not just...but also" construction fulfills the parallel structure rather fittingly. Also, the sentence maintains the original meaning of the author's take.
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Re: RAGCT Day 14: At nearly 38 million dollars, one  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Nov 2014, 16:51
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At nearly 38 million dollars, one of the least costly options being considered, the delegate’s proposal was ultimately rejected not only on account of its sizable budget but also on account of its considerable risk.

(A) At nearly 38 million dollars, one of the least costly options being considered, the delegate’s proposal was ultimately rejected not only on account of its sizable budget but also on account of its considerable risk.
Distortion of meaning. This answer choice does not mean to say that the proposal was rejected on account of its sizable budget and its considerable risk. If anything, the sizable budget is one of the best parts of the proposal

(B) Even at nearly 38 million dollars, the delegate’s proposal was among the less costly options being considered; it was ultimately rejected not on account of its sizable budget but on account of its riskiness.

(C) The delegate’s 38-million-dollar proposal, which was ultimately not rejected on account of its sizable budget but on account of its riskiness, had actually been one of the less costly options being considered.
Had must be accompanied with a past perfect.

(D) The delegate’s 38-million-dollar proposal, nevertheless among the least costly options being considered, was ultimately not rejected on account of its sizable budget, but its riskiness.
This one just sounded incredibly wordy and just awkward. Can anyone shed more light as to why this is wrong?

(E) Ultimately rejected due not just to its sizable budget but also to its considerable risk, the delegate’s proposal, even at 38 million dollars, was one of the least costly options under consideration.
This one also sounded wordy and awkward.
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Re: RAGCT Day 14: At nearly 38 million dollars, one  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Nov 2015, 10:42
At nearly 38 million dollars, one of the least costly options being considered, the delegate’s proposal was ultimately rejected not only on account of its sizable budget but also on account of its considerable risk.

(A) At nearly 38 million dollars, one of the least costly options being considered, the delegate’s proposal was ultimately rejected not only on account of its sizable budget but also on account of its considerable risk........not only x but also y idiom usage is incorrect here as it imparts incorrect meaning.

(B) Even at nearly 38 million dollars, the delegate’s proposal was among the less costly options being considered; it was ultimately rejected not on account of its sizable budget but on account of its riskiness.......parallelism between elements in not X but Y is maintained. proposal is at 38 m $ .is correctly described.

(C) The delegate’s 38-million-dollar proposal, which was ultimately not rejected on account of its sizable budget but on account of its riskiness, had actually been one of the less costly options being considered.............past perfect tense is improperly used since there is only one past event of rejection. Just being one of the less costly options is a past event.

(D) The delegate’s 38-million-dollar proposal, nevertheless among the least costly options being considered, was ultimately not rejected on account of its sizable budget, but its riskiness. (Not x but y structure is not parallel.)

(E) Ultimately rejected due not just to its sizable budget but also to its considerable risk, the delegate’s proposal, even at 38 million dollars, was one of the least costly options under consideration.........not only x but also y idiom usage is incorrect here as it imparts incorrect meaning and its incorrect form not x but also y is wrong.

out of B,C and D I chose C ignoring B for its two sentence format. Huge mistake of not reading an option completely.
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RAGCT Day 14: At nearly 38 million dollars, one  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Mar 2016, 22:00
Hey Guyz,

I understand why A,D and E are wrong and why B is correct. But, i have doubts in C, which i need some help with.

(C) The delegate’s 38-million-dollar proposal, which was ultimately not rejected on account of its sizable budget but on account of its riskiness, had actually been one of the less costly options being considered.

Many of us pointed that there are no two past actions presented and that is why 'had' is incorrectly used. I look at it differently and hence am confused. Below are the two actions that happened in past and because of which the usage of past perfect- had is warranted.

Action 1 (happened earlier in past): Being one of the less costly options
Action 2 (happened later in past): Being rejected


Therefore, a past perfect 'had' used with the earlier past action (Action 1) makes sense to me. Please correct me!

Btw, is there any other issue with C?

Do we have an OE for this?

Thanks!
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Re: RAGCT Day 14: At nearly 38 million dollars, one  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Mar 2016, 05:00
arhumsid wrote:
Hey Guyz,

I understand why A,D and E are wrong and why B is correct. But, i have doubts in C, which i need some help with.

(C) The delegate’s 38-million-dollar proposal, which was ultimately not rejected on account of its sizable budget but on account of its riskiness, had actually been one of the less costly options being considered.

Many of us pointed that there are no two past actions presented and that is why 'had' is incorrectly used. I look at it differently and hence am confused. Below are the two actions that happened in past and because of which the usage of past perfect- had is warranted.

Action 1 (happened earlier in past): Being one of the less costly options
Action 2 (happened later in past): Being rejected


Therefore, a past perfect 'had' used with the earlier past action (Action 1) makes sense to me. Please correct me!

Btw, is there any other issue with C?

Do we have an OE for this?

Thanks!


Action 1 (being a less costly option) did not happen before the action 2 ( being rejected). The proposal was still less costly while it was being rejected.
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RAGCT Day 14: At nearly 38 million dollars, one  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Apr 2016, 06:44
abhirupg07 wrote:
sayantanc2k wrote:
abhirupg07 wrote:
Very good question.. Still not convinced by the OE though. How is it correct to use "among" and "less costly" together?


Could you elaborate why would you not agree that "among" and "less costly options" could not be used together?

When we choose one from a number of distinct objects, we use "between", whereas when we choose one from a general group, we use "among".

I must choose a colour between red, blue and green...... red, blue and green are distinct choices.
I must choose a colour among those given in the shade book........ colours given the shade book is a group.

With the above logic, we may say that "less costly proposals" is a group of proposals. The delegate's proposal is one among the group. Therefore usage of "among" is appropriate here.


We use "between" when we have two distinct choices and we use "among" when we have more than two choices. To me, your example is wrong.

I must choose a colour among red, blue and green.
I must choose a colour between red and green.


And we use "less" when comparing between two choices and we use "least" when we are comparing among more than two choices.

For this particular example, are we comparing between one proposal (the least costly one) and the other group of proposals which are costlier? In that case it makes sense.


First:
The concept that "between" is used for two objects and "among" is used for more than two objects is wrong. Many people have this misconception and even certain prep books consist of this mistake. :)

I must choose a colour among red, blue and green: this sentence is grammatically incorrect.
I must choose a colour between red, blue and green: correct.
I must choose a colour between blue and green: correct.

Second:
It is perfectly alright to say:
My height is less than 50 other students of the class..... We are comparing one choice with 50 other choices. It is possible to use comparative adjective to compare one object with a group of objects.


Third:
Now let us come back to the subject question:
The delegate's proposal is one among a group of proposals (say group A). There is another group of proposals ( say group B), which are more costly than group A proposals. In this case it is perfectly alright to say that the delegate's proposal is one among the less costly proposals (i.e. group A proposals).

[Nevertheless we would preferably have a "than" along with the comparative adjective "less" ( in order to compare group A with group B).]

I would encourage you to continue this discussion if you do not agree with me. :-D
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Re: RAGCT Day 14: At nearly 38 million dollars, one  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Apr 2016, 11:17
abhirupg07 wrote:
I agree with points 2 & 3 that you mentioned, as I had already mentioned in my previous post, and this trick makes this a very good question. As far as the distinction between "among" and "between".. maybe we should let others weigh in with their opinions.


In the mean time, I could find the following topics on the internet that would provide insight on the usages of "among" and 'between" - as per the opinion of each of the writers of the following topics, the distinction between " among" and "between" is not because of the number of choices being 2 or more, but because of having distinct choices or not - Each of the writers do agree that "between" can indeed be used for more than 2 items, if they are distinct:

http://grammar.about.com/od/alightersid ... etween.htm
http://www.espressoenglish.net/whats-th ... and-among/
http://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar ... n-or-among
http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learn ... allenge46/
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/educat ... rsus-among
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Re: At nearly thirty-eight million dollars, one of the least costly option  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Apr 2016, 12:42
Can someone please explain me the concept of double -ves, or give me a link to study about it? :oops: :?: :?: :?:
D it contain double negating words "Nevertheless" and "not" altogether
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Re: At nearly thirty-eight million dollars, one of the least costly option  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Apr 2016, 19:09
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lotrgandalf wrote:
Can someone please explain me the concept of double -ves, or give me a link to study about it? :oops: :?: :?: :?:
D it contain double negating words "Nevertheless" and "not" altogether


Quote:
Nevertheless means
despite that/everything, after everything, having said that, that said, just the same, all the same, at the same time, in any event, come what may, at any rate, notwithstanding, regardless, anyway, anyhow etc.


Quote:
The delegate's thirty-eight million dollar proposal, nevertheless among the least costly options being considered, was ultimately not rejected on account of its sizable budget, but its riskiness.


Here nevertheless indicates that proposal is among the least costly options irrespective of all reasons.
not is used to explain the reason behind rejection in a simple manner and is part of not/but idiom.
These are negative words but double negation is altogether a different concept.
You can go through this article for the same.
double-negatives-206717.html
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Re: At nearly thirty-eight million dollars, one of the least costly option  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2016, 11:11
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Can somebody please explain why is (E) wrong? I know that (B) is gramatically correct but it is also changing the meaning and we can change the meaning of original sentence if and only if every other option has atleast 1 gramatical error. Hence, the exercise boils down to finding error in every option.
So, My issues are
1. Original sentence says that it is "one of the least costly options being considered", meaning that there may be options that are less costly than the one rejected. So, a devil's advocate would say that it can be rejected because of the budget. Therefore, (B) is not necessarily changing the meaning in the Positive direction. It is simply canging the meaning.
2. Now analyse (E) - We have an opening modifier that is correctly modifying correct noun "the delegate's proposal", which in turn is further modified by an appositive "even at thirty-eight million dollars", and finally we have the main verb of the sentence.
Structure -> Fine at the minimum and prefered by GMAT in reality because of the presence of appositive.
3. The only (possible) error that I can try to point is the usage of "Due to". I am not sure if it is correctly used here or must we use "because of". Except for this everything is fine. There are no errors in parallelism, tenses, agreement, meaning, wordiness, redundancy and punctuation.
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Re: At nearly thirty-eight million dollars, one of the least costly option  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2016, 01:13
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umg wrote:
Can somebody please explain why is (E) wrong? I know that (B) is gramatically correct but it is also changing the meaning and we can change the meaning of original sentence if and only if every other option has atleast 1 gramatical error. Hence, the exercise boils down to finding error in every option.
So, My issues are
1. Original sentence says that it is "one of the least costly options being considered", meaning that there may be options that are less costly than the one rejected. So, a devil's advocate would say that it can be rejected because of the budget. Therefore, (B) is not necessarily changing the meaning in the Positive direction. It is simply canging the meaning.
2. Now analyse (E) - We have an opening modifier that is correctly modifying correct noun "the delegate's proposal", which in turn is further modified by an appositive "even at thirty-eight million dollars", and finally we have the main verb of the sentence.
Structure -> Fine at the minimum and prefered by GMAT in reality because of the presence of appositive.
3. The only (possible) error that I can try to point is the usage of "Due to". I am not sure if it is correctly used here or must we use "because of". Except for this everything is fine. There are no errors in parallelism, tenses, agreement, meaning, wordiness, redundancy and punctuation.


You are absolutely on the right track. "Due" is an adjective and must refer to a noun (or noun phrase). Here "due to" refers to the past participle "rejected" and hence wrong. "Rejection was due to" could have been correct,but then the entire structure would have been required to be modified.
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Re: RAGCT Day 14: At nearly 38 million dollars, one  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2017, 06:00
carcass wrote:
Vinitkhicha1111 wrote:
A gud ques from a reliable and trusted source, I.e Veritas Prep. Was able to narrow it down to B & C but after that I was pretty not sure , although I marked one along them. Pls someone tell me that in many a lot SC ques I am narrow it down to 2 options with high level of surity but I get confused after this between these 2 options. Pls somebody ( esp this verbal forum moderators) throw some light on this and help me get over my plight , so that even one more member is able to score in the high 700's. :help2 :banana :yes



C is wrong for two main reasons: first of all, the sentence lacks of the main verbe. When you have HAD this tense must be paired with the simple past to maintain the parallellism.

You have two actions in the past: the first one is expressed with the simple past, and the second one, which is antecedent to the same, logically comes before the first one.

Secondly: if you cut off the long modifier the sentence loses its meaning; you do have only part of the story that it wants to convey

Hope this helps


Hi,

Could you please also explain why A is wrong?
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RAGCT Day 14: At nearly 38 million dollars, one  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2017, 04:26
arunavamunshi1988 wrote:
carcass wrote:
Vinitkhicha1111 wrote:
A gud ques from a reliable and trusted source, I.e Veritas Prep. Was able to narrow it down to B & C but after that I was pretty not sure , although I marked one along them. Pls someone tell me that in many a lot SC ques I am narrow it down to 2 options with high level of surity but I get confused after this between these 2 options. Pls somebody ( esp this verbal forum moderators) throw some light on this and help me get over my plight , so that even one more member is able to score in the high 700's. :help2 :banana :yes



C is wrong for two main reasons: first of all, the sentence lacks of the main verbe. When you have HAD this tense must be paired with the simple past to maintain the parallellism.

You have two actions in the past: the first one is expressed with the simple past, and the second one, which is antecedent to the same, logically comes before the first one.

Secondly: if you cut off the long modifier the sentence loses its meaning; you do have only part of the story that it wants to convey

Hope this helps


Hi,

Could you please also explain why A is wrong?


One might put up the following explanation to eliminate A:

The subject "the delegate’s proposal " has two consecutive modifiers without a conjunction between them:
1. At nearly 38 million dollars
2. one of the least costly options being considered

Two consecutive modifiers without a conjunction and referring to the same noun / noun phrase is considered wrong. (note in this sentence I used "and" between "without a conjunction" and "referring to the same noun / noun phrase "). In absence of the conjunction the second modifier erroneously refers to a noun in the first modifier rather than the intended noun. (e.g. in my sentence, if I did not use "and", then "referring to the same noun / noun phrase" would wrongly refer to "conjunction" rather than "modifiers".).


However the problem with the above reasoning to eliminate A is that the second modifier "one of the least costly options being considered" can as well refer to "38 million Dollars" rather than "the delegate’s proposal". This construction makes sense too. Hence I do not see this as a solid reason to eliminate A.

The correct reasoning is that we need a contrast that shows that the proposal was one of the least costly options, YET it was rejected. This contrast is better projected in B because of the word "even".
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Re: RAGCT Day 14: At nearly 38 million dollars, one  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Feb 2018, 08:17
At nearly 38 million dollars, one of the least costly options being considered, the delegate’s proposal was ultimately rejected not only on account of its sizable budget but also on account of its considerable risk.

(A) At nearly 38 million dollars, one of the least costly options being considered, the delegate’s proposal was ultimately rejected not only on account of its sizable budget but also on account of its considerable risk.

(B) Even at nearly 38 million dollars, the delegate’s proposal was among the less costly options being considered; it was ultimately rejected not on account of its sizable budget but on account of its riskiness.

(C) The delegate’s 38-million-dollar proposal, which was ultimately not rejected on account of its sizable budget but on account of its riskiness, had actually been one of the less costly options being considered.

(D) The delegate’s 38-million-dollar proposal, nevertheless among the least costly options being considered, was ultimately not rejected on account of its sizable budget, but its riskiness.

(E) Ultimately rejected due not just to its sizable budget but also to its considerable risk, the delegate’s proposal, even at 38 million dollars, was one of the least costly options under consideration.

(C) (D) (E) are immediately out because they distorted the intended meaning by removing the word "nearly.
Nearly 38 million is not the same as precisely 38 million.

I'll admit, it was difficult for me to pick out the errors in (A). I'm assuming it is because the modifier "at nearly 38 million dollars" is too far from the subject being modified (the delegate's proposal)
This is absolutely not the way to approach problems.
I just know (B) is a better answer.
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RAGCT Day 14: At nearly 38 million dollars, one  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Feb 2018, 18:29
At nearly 38 million dollars, one of the least costly options being considered, the delegate’s proposal was ultimately rejected not only on account of its sizable budget but also on account of its considerable risk.

(A) At nearly 38 million dollars, one of the least costly options being considered, the delegate’s proposal was ultimately rejected not only on account of its sizable budget but also on account of its considerable risk. begins with 2 fragmented sentences

(B) Even at nearly 38 million dollars, the delegate’s proposal was among the less costly options being considered; it was ultimately rejected not on account of its sizable budget but on account of its riskiness. The dependent clause (Even at nearly ~) is being explained with the latter sentence.

(C) The delegate’s 38-million-dollar proposal, which was ultimately not rejected on account of its sizable budget but on account of its riskiness, had actually been one of the less costly options being considered. wordy

(D) The delegate’s 38-million-dollar proposal, nevertheless among the least costly options being considered, was ultimately not rejected on account of its sizable budget, but its riskiness. parallel error

(E) Ultimately rejected due not just to its sizable budget but also to its considerable risk, the delegate’s proposal, even at 38 million dollars, was one of the least costly options under consideration. wordy

I think the key here is to distinguish whether clauses are independent or dependent.
Sentence needs at least one main clause (independent), dependent clause cannot stand alone.
Thus, B is the correct answer.
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Re: RAGCT Day 14: At nearly 38 million dollars, one  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Apr 2018, 06:38
sayantanc2k
What does it in option B refer to? Can it refer to the possessive delegate's proposal.
I cannot recall any official question in which it refers back to possessive.
Please help?
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Re: RAGCT Day 14: At nearly 38 million dollars, one &nbs [#permalink] 03 Apr 2018, 06:38

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