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Seventeenth-century philosopher John Locke stated that as much as 99

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Re: Seventeenth-century philosopher John Locke stated that as much as 99  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jul 2019, 23:30
Can someone please explain how they got down to QUESTION NO. 4 OPTION D?
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Re: Seventeenth-century philosopher John Locke stated that as much as 99  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2019, 02:48
lsat passages are long and hard to understand. but gmat passages are short and easy to understand. lsat questions are more easy than gmat questions. attention. this means gmat want us to infer and answer questions well and do not want to us to read hard passages like lsat passages.

i read lsat passages and see that they are long and contain many new words. gmat passages are much shorter and easy to understand . but we die because we do not answer questions well.
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Re: Seventeenth-century philosopher John Locke stated that as much as 99  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jul 2019, 00:45
Can anyone tell me why Question 6 has D as the answer and not E?

Quote:
RC00141-07 The author of the passage implies which of the following regarding the formulators of the labor theory of value?

(A) They came from a working-class background.

(B) Their views were too radical to have popular appeal.

(C) At least one of them was a close contemporary of Locke.

(D) They were familiar with Locke's views on the relationship between labor and the value of products.

(E) They underestimated the importance of consumer goods in a modern economy.
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Re: Seventeenth-century philosopher John Locke stated that as much as 99  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Aug 2019, 12:13
MahimaYadav wrote:
Can someone please explain how they got down to QUESTION NO. 4 OPTION D?

ozhass wrote:
Can anyone tell me why Question 6 has D as the answer and not E?

Quote:
RC00141-07 The author of the passage implies which of the following regarding the formulators of the labor theory of value?

(A) They came from a working-class background.

(B) Their views were too radical to have popular appeal.

(C) At least one of them was a close contemporary of Locke.

(D) They were familiar with Locke's views on the relationship between labor and the value of products.

(E) They underestimated the importance of consumer goods in a modern economy.

Question 4


To answer Question #4 (about the organization of the passage), the best thing to do is to use POE to get rid of the incorrect answer choices:
Quote:
(A) The author explores the origins of a theory and explains why the theory never gained widespread acceptance.

The author does explore the origins of a theory, but never addresses whether that theory has gained widespread acceptance. (A) is out.

Quote:
(B) The author introduces the premise of a theory, evaluates the premise by relating it to objective reality, then proposes a modification of the theory.

The author never proposes a modification to a theory -- instead, he/she merely points out a failing of the theory. Get rid of (B).

Quote:
(C) After quoting a well-known authority, the author describes the evolution of a theory, then traces its modern form back to the original quotation.

The author does quote a well-known authority and describe the evolution of a theory, but does he/she trace this theory back to the original quotation?

The quotation in question is "“the effects of labor.” At the end of the passage, the author links the failings of the modern theory back to Locke, but not specifically to this quotation. Because it is somewhat nonsensical to say that the author traces the theory back to this quotation, (C) is out.

Quote:
(D) After citing a precursor of a theory, the author outlines and refutes the theory, then links its flaw to the precursor.

This is precisely how the passage is organized -- the author introduces Locke ideas as the precursors to the labor theory of value, criticizes that theory, and then links the theory's failings back to Locke. (D) is looking good.

Quote:
(E) After tracing the roots of a theory, the author attempts to undermine the theory by discrediting its originator.

As pointed out by VeritasKarishma in this post, the author doesn't undermine the theory by discrediting its originator -- he/she criticizes the argument itself, and then states that Locke is partially to blame for this flaw in the argument.

Eliminate (E). (D) is the correct answer to question #4.

Question 6


Question #6 asks about the "formulators of the labor theory of value (LTOV)."

Let's look at the evidence for (E):
Quote:
(E) They underestimated the importance of consumer goods in a modern economy.

The LTOV formulators believed that 100% of the value of any product is generated by labor.

The author goes on to make a distinction between consumer goods and capital goods. He/she argues that the owners of capital goods (in other words, NOT the laborers) should be compensated for the contribution that capital goods make in producing consumer goods. This is an argument against the LTOV.

The author states that, by insisting that 100% of the value of any product is generated by labor, the "labor theory of value systematically disregards the productive contribution of capital goods."

So, the formulators of the LTOV do not underestimate the importance of consumer goods -- according to the passage, they underestimate the contribution of capital goods.

(E) is out.

Now take a look at (D):
Quote:
(D) They were familiar with Locke's views on the relationship between labor and the value of products.

The formulators of the LTOV are described in the passage as Locke's "intellectual heirs." In order for this to be true, they would need to be familiar with Locke's theories, so that their own theory could grow from his initial ideas.

(D) is the correct answer to question #6.

I hope that helps!
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Re: Seventeenth-century philosopher John Locke stated that as much as 99  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Aug 2019, 11:12
Hi GMATNinja Gnpth SajjadAhmad

Why D is the OA for Q.No:6, RC00141-07.

Per my understanding:
Followers of Locke find that LTOV is acceptable. Formulators of LTOV held that entire credit must go to workmen and employers should not view it in profit perspective.

My doubt is, How we can infer that the formulators of LTOV are familiar with Locke's theory.
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Seventeenth-century philosopher John Locke stated that as much as 99  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Aug 2019, 13:52
RC00141-04 Which of the following statements, if true, would most effectively counter the author's criticism of Locke at the end of the passage?

(A) Locke was unfamiliar with the labor theory of value as it was formulated by his intellectual heirs.

(B) In Locke's day, there was no possibility of ordinary workers becoming shareholders or pension beneficiaries.

(C) During Locke's lifetime, capital goods did not make a significant productive contribution to the economy.

(D) The precise statistical calculation of the productive contributions of labor and capital goods is not possible without computers.

(E) The terms “capital goods” and “consumer goods” were coined by modern economists and do not appear in Locke's writings.

daagh GMATNinja
Can anybody please explain why "E" is incorrect?
If those terms/bifurcation did not exist at that time when theory was created, how can those be considered. Thereby, countering the author's criticism.

Thanks in advance!
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Re: Seventeenth-century philosopher John Locke stated that as much as 99  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2019, 06:20
RC00141-05 Which of the following best describes the organization of the passage?

(A) The author explores the origins of a theory and explains why the theory never gained widespread acceptance.

(B) The author introduces the premise of a theory, evaluates the premise by relating it to objective reality, then proposes a modification of the theory.

(C) After quoting a well-known authority, the author describes the evolution of a theory, then traces its modern form back to the original quotation.

(D) After citing a precursor of a theory, the author outlines and refutes the theory, then links its flaw to the precursor.

(E) After tracing the roots of a theory, the author attempts to undermine the theory by discrediting its originator.

why is option D correct and not E.
as per para2 author seems to be undermining the theory .
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Re: Seventeenth-century philosopher John Locke stated that as much as 99  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2019, 11:12
Dhruvnneo wrote:
RC00141-05 Which of the following best describes the organization of the passage?

(A) The author explores the origins of a theory and explains why the theory never gained widespread acceptance.

(B) The author introduces the premise of a theory, evaluates the premise by relating it to objective reality, then proposes a modification of the theory.

(C) After quoting a well-known authority, the author describes the evolution of a theory, then traces its modern form back to the original quotation.

(D) After citing a precursor of a theory, the author outlines and refutes the theory, then links its flaw to the precursor.

(E) After tracing the roots of a theory, the author attempts to undermine the theory by discrediting its originator.

why is option D correct and not E.
as per para2 author seems to be undermining the theory .


"discrediting" is the word which is why E is wrong.

D is correct, because in the last para author says "The labor theory of value systematically disregards the productive contribution of capital goods—a failing for which Locke must bear part of the blame." Here, the flaw is linked to the precursor. The originator is not getting discredited.

Hope this helps!
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Re: Seventeenth-century philosopher John Locke stated that as much as 99  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Sep 2019, 10:41
gvvsnraju@12 wrote:
Hi GMATNinja Gnpth SajjadAhmad

Why D is the OA for Q.No:6, RC00141-07.

Per my understanding:
Followers of Locke find that LTOV is acceptable. Formulators of LTOV held that entire credit must go to workmen and employers should not view it in profit perspective.

My doubt is, How we can infer that the formulators of LTOV are familiar with Locke's theory.

Take a look at this post for an explanation of (D) for question #6, and let me know whether that clears it up!

RaunaqSinghPunn wrote:
RC00141-04 Which of the following statements, if true, would most effectively counter the author's criticism of Locke at the end of the passage?

(A) Locke was unfamiliar with the labor theory of value as it was formulated by his intellectual heirs.

(B) In Locke's day, there was no possibility of ordinary workers becoming shareholders or pension beneficiaries.

(C) During Locke's lifetime, capital goods did not make a significant productive contribution to the economy.

(D) The precise statistical calculation of the productive contributions of labor and capital goods is not possible without computers.

(E) The terms “capital goods” and “consumer goods” were coined by modern economists and do not appear in Locke's writings.

daagh GMATNinja
Can anybody please explain why "E" is incorrect?
If those terms/bifurcation did not exist at that time when theory was created, how can those be considered. Thereby, countering the author's criticism.

Thanks in advance!

(E) specifies that the terms did not appear in Locke's writings, which is different than saying that the things that those terms refer to did not exist at that time. The fact that the terms did not exist in their current form is not an effective counter to author's argument.

Here's an example: a person went on an unprovoked murderous rampage and then stole a sandwich in ancient times, before the words "murder" and "sandwich" were coined. We can still criticize this person's actions as immoral, even if the terms for those actions did not yet exist.

Similarly, the author can still hold Locke accountable for disregarding the contribution of "capital goods," even if the term did not yet exist at the time of Locke's writings.

I hope that helps!
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Seventeenth-century philosopher John Locke stated that as much as 99  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Sep 2019, 18:22
Quote:
(E) specifies that the terms did not appear in Locke's writings, which is different than saying that the things that those terms refer to did not exist at that time. The fact that the terms did not exist in their current form is not an effective counter to author's argument.

Here's an example: a person went on an unprovoked murderous rampage and then stole a sandwich in ancient times, before the words "murder" and "sandwich" were coined. We can still criticize this person's actions as immoral, even if the terms for those actions did not yet exist.

Similarly, the author can still hold Locke accountable for disregarding the contribution of "capital goods," even if the term did not yet exist at the time of Locke's writings.

I hope that helps!


I was going to tag you ( GMATNinja ) for the same question but then found this explanation. And looks like your sandwich made things clear to me and made me hungry too.

Thank you!
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Re: Seventeenth-century philosopher John Locke stated that as much as 99  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Sep 2019, 02:10
Hi GMATNinja,
Can you please explain why C is the answer to question 1 ? The option states that the author's main point is to question the 'validity' of the LTOV. But I don't think the author is doing so. I believe he points out a limitation or a flaw in the theory, and on the basis of this reasoning I marked B. Do you agree ?
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Re: Seventeenth-century philosopher John Locke stated that as much as 99   [#permalink] 11 Sep 2019, 02:10

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