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Some theorists and critics insist that no aesthetic evaluation of a wo

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Some theorists and critics insist that no aesthetic evaluation of a wo  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Sep 2019, 10:45
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Some theorists and critics insist that no aesthetic evaluation of a work of art is sound if it is based even in part on data about the cultural background of the artist. This opinion is clearly false. The only sound aesthetic evaluations of artists' works are those that take into account factors such as the era and the place of the artists' births, their upbringing and education, and the values of their societies—in sum, those factors that are part of their cultural background.

The above argument is most vulnerable to which of the following objections?

A. The argument presupposes the conclusion for which it purports to provide evidence.
B. The argument cites evidence that undermines rather than supports the conclusion.
C. The argument draws its conclusion by means of an equivocal interpretation of key terms.
D. The argument assumes that the production of an effect is evidence of an intention to produce that effect.
E. The argument assumes that evaluative disputes can be resolved by citing factual evidence.


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Some theorists and critics insist that no aesthetic evaluation of a wo  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Sep 2019, 01:56
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Some theorists and critics insist that no aesthetic evaluation of a work of art is sound if it is based even in part on data about the cultural background of the artist. This opinion is clearly false. The only sound aesthetic evaluations of artists' works are those that take into account factors such as the era and the place of the artists' births, their upbringing and education, and the values of their societies—in sum, those factors that are part of their cultural background.

Type- flaw
Core- though the author rejects the claim of some theorists and critics, he does not provide any evidence to support his claim

A. The argument presupposes the conclusion for which it purports to provide evidence. - Correct, the argument presupposes the conclusion(This opinion is clearly false) and does not provide any evidence to support the main conclusion
B. The argument cites evidence that undermines rather than supports the conclusion.- incorrect, no evidence cited undermines the conclusion
C. The argument draws its conclusion by means of an equivocal interpretation of key terms.- incorrect, there is no equivocal interpretation of key term
D. The argument assumes that the production of an effect is evidence of an intention to produce that effect.- incorrect, there is no discussion about intent
E. The argument assumes that evaluative disputes can be resolved by citing factual evidence. - incorrect, there is no discussion about evaluative disputes

Answer A
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Re: Some theorists and critics insist that no aesthetic evaluation of a wo  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2019, 01:41
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gmatt1476 wrote:
Some theorists and critics insist that no aesthetic evaluation of a work of art is sound if it is based even in part on data about the cultural background of the artist. This opinion is clearly false. The only sound aesthetic evaluations of artists' works are those that take into account factors such as the era and the place of the artists' births, their upbringing and education, and the values of their societies—in sum, those factors that are part of their cultural background.

The above argument is most vulnerable to which of the following objections?

A. The argument presupposes the conclusion for which it purports to provide evidence.
B. The argument cites evidence that undermines rather than supports the conclusion.
C. The argument draws its conclusion by means of an equivocal interpretation of key terms.
D. The argument assumes that the production of an effect is evidence of an intention to produce that effect.
E. The argument assumes that evaluative disputes can be resolved by citing factual evidence.


CR70870.01


Official Explanation

Argument Evaluation

This question asks us to identify which of the objections listed among the answer choices the argument is most vulnerable to.

The argument's conclusion is that the opinion, expressed by some theorists and critics, that no aesthetic evaluation of a work of art is sound if it is based even in part on data about the cultural background of the artist, is false.

The only reason given for this conclusion is essentially a reiteration of the conclusion: that the cultural background is in fact vital to aesthetic evaluation of the artist. Given that the only reason given against the theorists' and critics' opinion is an opposite opinion, the argument is circular.

Therefore, the answer to this question must identify this: that is, that the argument presupposes the truth of the conclusion for which it claims to provide evidence.

A. Correct. As indicated above, the argument is vulnerable to this criticism.

B. The argument does not cite evidence that undermines rather than supports the conclusion. In fact, the argument's “evidence” for its conclusion is simply a reiteration of the conclusion itself.

C. The argument does not equivocate on any key terms.

D. The argument does not assume that the production of an effect means that one intended to produce that effect.

E. The argument does not assume that facts will resolve evaluative disputes.

The correct answer is A.
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Re: Some theorists and critics insist that no aesthetic evaluation of a wo  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Oct 2019, 00:01
gmatt1476 wrote:
Some theorists and critics insist that no aesthetic evaluation of a work of art is sound if it is based even in part on data about the cultural background of the artist. This opinion is clearly false. The only sound aesthetic evaluations of artists' works are those that take into account factors such as the era and the place of the artists' births, their upbringing and education, and the values of their societies—in sum, those factors that are part of their cultural background.

The above argument is most vulnerable to which of the following objections?

A. The argument presupposes the conclusion for which it purports to provide evidence.
B. The argument cites evidence that undermines rather than supports the conclusion.
C. The argument draws its conclusion by means of an equivocal interpretation of key terms.
D. The argument assumes that the production of an effect is evidence of an intention to produce that effect.
E. The argument assumes that evaluative disputes can be resolved by citing factual evidence.


CR70870.01


at what level are such questions asked
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Re: Some theorists and critics insist that no aesthetic evaluation of a wo  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Oct 2019, 08:09
generis

Please explain option A.
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Re: Some theorists and critics insist that no aesthetic evaluation of a wo  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Oct 2019, 12:12
gmatt1476 wrote:
Some theorists and critics insist that no aesthetic evaluation of a work of art is sound if it is based even in part on data about the cultural background of the artist. This opinion is clearly false. The only sound aesthetic evaluations of artists' works are those that take into account factors such as the era and the place of the artists' births, their upbringing and education, and the values of their societies—in sum, those factors that are part of their cultural background.

The above argument is most vulnerable to which of the following objections?

A. The argument presupposes the conclusion for which it purports to provide evidence.
B. The argument cites evidence that undermines rather than supports the conclusion.
C. The argument draws its conclusion by means of an equivocal interpretation of key terms.
D. The argument assumes that the production of an effect is evidence of an intention to produce that effect.
E. The argument assumes that evaluative disputes can be resolved by citing factual evidence.


CR70870.01


VeritasKarishma GMATNinja GMATGuruNY egmat
Can you please explain what it meant by "evaluative disputes" ?
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Re: Some theorists and critics insist that no aesthetic evaluation of a wo  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Oct 2019, 04:11
Here is my take on the question:

Conclusion:
This [that no aesthetic evaluation of a work of art is sound if it is based even in part on data about the cultural background of the artist] opinion is clearly false.

Let start with POE:
B) The argument cites evidence that undermines rather than supports the conclusion. This does not undermine the conclusion at all.
C) The argument draws its conclusion by means of an equivocal interpretation of key terms. There is no ambiguous interpretation of any key term
E) The argument assumes that evaluative disputes can be resolved by citing factual evidence. 'evaluative disputes' between the 'Some theorists and critics' and the 'author of the argument' can not be resolved by citing the evidence. You are just citing a point that favors one perspective.

So the main issue is in between :

A) The argument presupposes the conclusion for which it purports to provide evidence. Okay, so I previously picked D over A. But I think that when you go back to the argument you will see that the sentence is in present. " The only sound aesthetic evaluations of artists' works are those that take into account factors such". This is a general statement, thus it is not a proof something like this "The only sound aesthetic evaluations of artists' works have been.....". That means he is providing no proof just providing some more claims. Thus this is the answer.

D) The argument assumes that the production of an effect is evidence of an intention to produce that effect. So why I got confused. I thought that "the effect" is "sound aesthetic evaluations of artists' works are those that take into account factors..." which the author is using to provide support, is assumed as actually the evidence to produce the effect. But I missed that it is a general statement as described above in option A.
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Re: Some theorists and critics insist that no aesthetic evaluation of a wo  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Oct 2019, 06:04
sayan640 wrote:
gmatt1476 wrote:
Some theorists and critics insist that no aesthetic evaluation of a work of art is sound if it is based even in part on data about the cultural background of the artist. This opinion is clearly false. The only sound aesthetic evaluations of artists' works are those that take into account factors such as the era and the place of the artists' births, their upbringing and education, and the values of their societies—in sum, those factors that are part of their cultural background.

The above argument is most vulnerable to which of the following objections?

A. The argument presupposes the conclusion for which it purports to provide evidence.
B. The argument cites evidence that undermines rather than supports the conclusion.
C. The argument draws its conclusion by means of an equivocal interpretation of key terms.
D. The argument assumes that the production of an effect is evidence of an intention to produce that effect.
E. The argument assumes that evaluative disputes can be resolved by citing factual evidence.


CR70870.01


VeritasKarishma GMATNinja GMATGuruNY egmat
Can you please explain what it meant by "evaluative disputes" ?


"Evaluative disputes" are just disputes regarding evaluation. The argument discusses a dispute regarding evaluation -
"some critics insist that no aesthetic evaluation of a work of art is sound if ..."
"this is false. The only sound aesthetic evaluations of artists' works are those ..."
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Re: Some theorists and critics insist that no aesthetic evaluation of a wo   [#permalink] 23 Oct 2019, 06:04
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