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The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy

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The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Oct 2015, 04:16
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Cafeteria patron: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy. The cashier told me that the apples are in that condition when they are delivered to the cafeteria and that the cafeteria does not wash the apples it sells. Most fruit is sprayed with dangerous pesticides before it is harvested, and is dangerous until it is washed. Clearly, the cafeteria is selling pesticide-covered fruit, thereby endangering its patrons.

Which one of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

(A) The apples that the cafeteria sells are not thoroughly washed after harvest but before reaching the cafeteria.

(B) Most pesticides that are sprayed on fruit before harvest leave a greasy residue on the fruit.

(C) Many of the cafeteria's patrons are unaware that the cafeteria does not wash the apples it sells.

(D) Only pesticides that leave a greasy residue on fruit can be washed off.

(E) Fruits other than apples also arrive at the cafeteria in a greasy condition.

Source: Lsat Old Papers
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Re: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy  [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2018, 23:37
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madhukaramar Be careful--answer choice A is not a restatement of the premise. If it were, it would definitely not be the answer for an assumption question. The LSAT is a very carefully-written test!

The problem with the argument is that it's assuming that since the apples haven't been washed since arriving at the store, they have NEVER been cleansed of pesticides. Imagine that they were washed after picking, but then they sat in warehouses and trucks for a long time before reaching the cafeteria. Then they might be dirty, but still relatively free of pesticides. This is what A is addressing. The author is assuming that no washing happened BETWEEN the time the pesticide was applied and the time they arrived at the cafeteria.
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The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Oct 2015, 04:19
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Why is the Answer Not
B: B fills the Gap between by saying "Apples being greasy" is because they are sprayed with pesticide"
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Re: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Nov 2015, 07:13
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Conclusion is “Clearly, the cafeteria is selling pesticide-covered fruit, thereby endangering its patrons” .

The focus should be on the question why they have to wash it for not putting patrons under danger.

(B) Most pesticides that are sprayed on fruit before harvest leave a greasy residue on the fruit.

–->So some pesticide may not leave greasy residue. Does it mean they need not wash it? B makes it sound like being greasy is the reason for washing.

(A) The apples that the cafeteria sells are not thoroughly washed after harvest but before reaching the cafeteria.

-->Correct. Since they are not washed after harvest it is not a good to consume it without washing irrespective of the fact that it s greasy or not.
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Re: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Nov 2015, 04:11
I still don't get why A is correct. Can anyone elaborate further?
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Re: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Nov 2015, 15:17
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Hi

The conclusion is that the cafeteria is selling pesticide-covered fruits, thereby endangering its patrons.

Premise : Most fruit is sprayed with dangerous pesticides before it is harvested, and is dangerous until it is washed.

And the statements before that have been used to provide a background on the argument.

When you say that B is the correct answer, you do not take into account that even if there is no grease on the fruit, the fruit is still dangerous to be consumed as per the premise.
And the conclusion stands as it is.

Whereas in A, they clearly state that the fruit was not washed after harvest is why it should be washed now.
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The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Nov 2015, 15:13
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Keep in mind who is making the argument: a client

Premise: Cafeteria does not wash the apples
Premise: Apple are sprayed with dangerous pesticides and are dangerous until washed
Conclusion: Cafeteria is selling pesticide-covered fruit

So the client must have assumed that since the apples are not washed after harvest (conclusion), hence dangerous for DIRECT consumption until washed (premise), and the cafeteria does not wash the apples, they are washed before it reached the cafeteria.

The cafeteria on the other hand is assuming the client will wash the apples before consumption reason why it's not washing the apples delivered.

A is the assumption made by the client
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Re: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jul 2017, 08:50
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RaviChandra wrote:
Cafeteria patron: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy. The cashier told me that the apples are in that condition when they are delivered to the cafeteria and that the cafeteria does not wash the apples it sells. Most fruit is sprayed with dangerous pesticides before it is harvested, and is dangerous until it is washed. Clearly, the cafeteria is selling pesticide-covered fruit, thereby endangering its patrons.

Which one of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

(A) The apples that the cafeteria sells are not thoroughly washed after harvest but before reaching the cafeteria.

(B) Most pesticides that are sprayed on fruit before harvest leave a greasy residue on the fruit.

(C) Many of the cafeteria's patrons are unaware that the cafeteria does not wash the apples it sells.

(D) Only pesticides that leave a greasy residue on fruit can be washed off.

(E) Fruits other than apples also arrive at the cafeteria in a greasy condition.

Source: Lsat Old Papers


Highlighted part is the clue. Fruit not washed => dangerous. From the stimulus we know that it is not washed in the cafeteria. We do not know if it is washed before it arrived to cafeteria. That's a big leap made by the patron. Hence (A) is the answer.
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Re: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jul 2017, 01:57
In this kind of questions, presumption techniques help better than negation.After I read the question ,the immediate thought crosses my mind was ok..that means the farmers are not washing it before selling it to the cafeteria or the customers are not washing it before taking it back to the home.Now Option A exactly says that.

Now coming back to B,which is the most popular wrong choice says that most pesticides leave a greasy residue.Now whats if some pesticides leave a greasy residue.The allegation would still be valid.So B is wrong.
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Re: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy  [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2018, 09:40
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The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy  [#permalink]

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New post 28 May 2018, 02:13
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souvik101990 - Could you help our here please.Below is my analysis.

Cafeteria patron: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy. The cashier told me that the apples are in that condition when they are delivered to the cafeteria and that the cafeteria does not wash the apples it sells. Most fruit is sprayed with dangerous pesticides before it is harvested, and is dangerous until it is washed. Clearly, the cafeteria is selling pesticide-covered fruit, thereby endangering its patrons.

Which one of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

(A) The apples that the cafeteria sells are not thoroughly washed after harvest but before reaching the cafeteria.
-Although this is the best answer - I have a question. "The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy" is already stated as premise so this options actually tells the same story in
different way. So just a reword of a premise can be considered as an assumption ??

(B) Most pesticides that are sprayed on fruit before harvest leave a greasy residue on the fruit.
- This must not be true to hold the conclusion. Even if less than 50% of pesticides leave grease (negation) - the conclusion holds true.

(C) Many of the cafeteria's patrons are unaware that the cafeteria does not wash the apples it sells.
- This is Out of Scope. Patron's are aware or not doesn't impact the conclusion that the cafeteria is selling pesticide-covered fruit, thereby endangering its patrons

(D) Only pesticides that leave a greasy residue on fruit can be washed off.
- Irrelevant

(E) Fruits other than apples also arrive at the cafeteria in a greasy condition.
- Irrelevant.
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Re: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy  [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2018, 11:51
Cafeteria patron: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy. The cashier told me that the apples are in that condition when they are delivered to the cafeteria and that the cafeteria does not wash the apples it sells. Most fruit is sprayed with dangerous pesticides before it is harvested, and is dangerous until it is washed. Clearly, the cafeteria is selling pesticide-covered fruit, thereby endangering its patrons.

Which one of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

(A) The apples that the cafeteria sells are not thoroughly washed after harvest but before reaching the cafeteria.

(B) Most pesticides that are sprayed on fruit before harvest leave a greasy residue on the fruit.

(C) Many of the cafeteria's patrons are unaware that the cafeteria does not wash the apples it sells.

(D) Only pesticides that leave a greasy residue on fruit can be washed off.

(E) Fruits other than apples also arrive at the cafeteria in a greasy condition.

Source: Lsat Old Papers
Spoiler: OA
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Re: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy  [#permalink]

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New post 30 May 2018, 02:49
DmitryFarber wrote:
madhukaramar Be careful--answer choice A is not a restatement of the premise. If it were, it would definitely not be the answer for an assumption question. The LSAT is a very carefully-written test!

The problem with the argument is that it's assuming that since the apples haven't been washed since arriving at the store, they have NEVER been cleansed of pesticides. Imagine that they were washed after picking, but then they sat in warehouses and trucks for a long time before reaching the cafeteria. Then they might be dirty, but still relatively free of pesticides. This is what A is addressing. The author is assuming that no washing happened BETWEEN the time the pesticide was applied and the time they arrived at the cafeteria.


DmitryFarber - Thanks for explaining !!! I get it now.
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Re: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2018, 04:34
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RaviChandra wrote:
Cafeteria patron: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy. The cashier told me that the apples are in that condition when they are delivered to the cafeteria and that the cafeteria does not wash the apples it sells. Most fruit is sprayed with dangerous pesticides before it is harvested, and is dangerous until it is washed. Clearly, the cafeteria is selling pesticide-covered fruit, thereby endangering its patrons.

Which one of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

(A) The apples that the cafeteria sells are not thoroughly washed after harvest but before reaching the cafeteria.

(B) Most pesticides that are sprayed on fruit before harvest leave a greasy residue on the fruit.

(C) Many of the cafeteria's patrons are unaware that the cafeteria does not wash the apples it sells.

(D) Only pesticides that leave a greasy residue on fruit can be washed off.

(E) Fruits other than apples also arrive at the cafeteria in a greasy condition.

Source: Lsat Old Papers


Understand from various explanations that A is the correct choice.
"(A) The apples that the cafeteria sells are not thoroughly washed after harvest but before reaching the cafeteria."
What do these words in red actually convey? The first part is very clear --> apples are not thoroughly washed, after harvest.
This "but" statement is confusing - probably because I am a non-native English speaker.
Please help, thanks.
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Re: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2018, 04:58
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Conclusion: The cafeteria is selling pesticide laden and thereby dangerous apples.

Note: The argument makes a leap from the fact that he cafeteria does not wash the apples to since apples are sprayed with pesticides, the cafeteria is selling them in that condition only. But what if in middle of the process from apples collection to delivery to the cafeteria, the apples are washed or sprayed with something to remove pesticides or undergo some process that to increase life while also removing pesticides? The argument assumes that none of such activities take place and thereby the cafeteria is selling the apples in same condition as they were when collected from the farm.

(A) The apples that the cafeteria sells are not thoroughly washed after harvest but before reaching the cafeteria.
If the apples are washed before they reach the cafeteria, then the argument breaks down. Correct.

(B) Most pesticides that are sprayed on fruit before harvest leave a greasy residue on the fruit. Negation does nothing to the argument. If "most" pesticides do not leave a greasy residue, the point whether the pesticides are present on apples when they are sold at the cafeteria is not affected at all.

(C) Many of the cafeteria's patrons are unaware that the cafeteria does not wash the apples it sells. Irrelevant.

(D) Only pesticides that leave a greasy residue on fruit can be washed off. Irrelevant to the argument.

(E) Fruits other than apples also arrive at the cafeteria in a greasy condition. Irrelevant.
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Re: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jun 2018, 09:37
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From Dan @MahattanPrep

Take this example:

I went to the store after Monday but before Friday.

How would you interpret this sentence? List out the possible days on which I went to the store. Take a second and think about it before reading on.

"After Monday but before Friday" means sometime between Monday and Friday. So the possible days on which I went to the store are Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday. The idiom "After X but before Y" serves to set up a time frame that is bounded on the front end by X and on the back end by Y.

If we make it negative:

I did NOT go to the store after Monday but before Friday.

...we interpret it the same way. I did NOT go on Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday.

In the case of the apples:

The apples were not washed after harvest but before reaching the cafeteria.

We have a bounded timeframe with harvest being the front end and reaching the cafeteria being the back end. The apples were not washed in that timeframe.
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Re: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jun 2018, 16:29
ravitejajasti wrote:
From Dan @MahattanPrep

Take this example:

I went to the store after Monday but before Friday.

How would you interpret this sentence? List out the possible days on which I went to the store. Take a second and think about it before reading on.

"After Monday but before Friday" means sometime between Monday and Friday. So the possible days on which I went to the store are Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday. The idiom "After X but before Y" serves to set up a time frame that is bounded on the front end by X and on the back end by Y.

If we make it negative:

I did NOT go to the store after Monday but before Friday.

...we interpret it the same way. I did NOT go on Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday.

In the case of the apples:

The apples were not washed after harvest but before reaching the cafeteria.

We have a bounded timeframe with harvest being the front end and reaching the cafeteria being the back end. The apples were not washed in that timeframe.


I feel the way option A is constructed doesn't make sense... I interpreted the option as yes, the apples were not washed after harvest But we're washed before reaching the cafeteria...i interpreted it as a contrast because of the word 'but' am I wrong?

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Re: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2018, 22:02
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"But" is just setting a limit on the time when this occurred. It's like saying "Over 18 but under 25": 18 < x < 25. In A we have picking - wash - store.
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Re: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2018, 22:16
Answer A
The producer could wash the apples after harvest, before they get to cafeteria. So apples are washed.
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Re: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jul 2018, 01:52
Conclusion: The cafeteria is selling pesticide-covered fruit, thereby endangering its patrons
Premise: The apples are in that condition when they are delivered to the cafeteria and that the cafeteria does not wash the apples it sells. Most fruit is sprayed with dangerous pesticides before it is harvested, and is dangerous until it is washed. So the gap is that what happens once the apples are out from the field and before they reach to the cafeteria. In order to establish the conclusion, it has to be assumed that the apples remained unwashed.
A: The author assumes that there was no washing of apples done during the time the pesticides were applied and b the time the apples reached the cafeteria. Also, if we negate this assumption, the conclusion will collapse. Hence A is the right answer.
B: This choice suggests being greasy is the reason that the apples should be washed.
C: Does not matter as long as there are others responsible for washing them
D: Does not lead to the conclusion, irrelevant to the argument
E: Other fruits are irrelevant to the discussion.
For assumption questions always take a negation test to justify the correct answer.
Hope it helps. Please get in touch for further help.
Keep practicing, consistency is the key.
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Re: The apples sold in this cafeteria are greasy &nbs [#permalink] 09 Jul 2018, 01:52

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