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The architectural problem of how to enclose and articulate interior

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The architectural problem of how to enclose and articulate interior  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 16 May 2018, 22:06
3
13
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  55% (hard)

Question Stats:

54% (01:14) correct 46% (01:19) wrong based on 588 sessions

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The architectural problem of how to enclose and articulate interior space becomes increasingly critical as the size of the space gets larger.


(a) increasingly critical as the size of the space gets larger
(b) ever more critical as the size of the space increases
(c) more and more critical as the size of the space will increase
(d) one that is increasingly critical as there is an increase in the size of the space
(e) more critical with the size of the space getting larger



I picked a, but I am wrong.
So I googled, and most people picked a as the answer like me.
Some picked b, but they assumed "ever" was a typo.(It is not a typo)

If ever in b were even as some assume, I would agree that OA is b.
But I've never heard 'ever more critical', and it sounds awkward to me.(Maybe because it's I am not a native English speaker.)

Anyone can explain what's wrong with a and how b can be OA?

Originally posted by eybrj2 on 12 Feb 2012, 01:24.
Last edited by Bunuel on 16 May 2018, 22:06, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: The architectural problem of how to enclose and articulate interior  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Feb 2012, 01:40
Hey,

IMO,

meaning of the sentence - Architectural problem becomes increasingly problematic with the increase in the size of the space.
'Size of the space' - This phrase will give us a 3-2 split. Size can increase or decrease. This eliminates 'A' and 'E'

a) size of the space gets larger -> usage of word 'larger' warrants for a comparison, which the sentence does not make.
b) Correct
c) size of the space will increase - awkward construction
d) as there is an increase - awkward
e) cannot associate larger with a size without making a comparison.

Hope this helps. :)
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Re: The architectural problem of how to enclose and articulate interior  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2012, 09:31
BigNasty wrote:
Hey,

IMO,

meaning of the sentence - Architectural problem becomes increasingly problematic with the increase in the size of the space.
'Size of the space' - This phrase will give us a 3-2 split. Size can increase or decrease. This eliminates 'A' and 'E'

a) size of the space gets larger -> usage of word 'larger' warrants for a comparison, which the sentence does not make.
b) Correct
c) size of the space will increase - awkward construction
d) as there is an increase - awkward
e) cannot associate larger with a size without making a comparison.

Hope this helps. :)


Yes, but in answer B the word larger disappears, therefore the use of more to make a parallel comparison is not necessary.... I still think IMO is A.
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Re: The architectural problem of how to enclose and articulate interior  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2012, 09:51
Saurajm wrote:
BigNasty wrote:
Hey,

IMO,

meaning of the sentence - Architectural problem becomes increasingly problematic with the increase in the size of the space.
'Size of the space' - This phrase will give us a 3-2 split. Size can increase or decrease. This eliminates 'A' and 'E'

a) size of the space gets larger -> usage of word 'larger' warrants for a comparison, which the sentence does not make.
b) Correct
c) size of the space will increase - awkward construction
d) as there is an increase - awkward
e) cannot associate larger with a size without making a comparison.

Hope this helps. :)


Yes, but in answer B the word larger disappears, therefore the use of more to make a parallel comparison is not necessary.... I still think IMO is A.


Hi,

Space cant get larger.... Space increases

I hope this is more clear from the below definition (Citation : http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/larger?s=t)
" large  [lahrj] Show IPA adjective, larg·er, larg·est, noun, adverb
adjective
1.of more than average size, quantity, degree, etc.; exceeding that which is common to a kind or class; big; great: a large house; a large number; in large measure; to a large extent.
2.on a great scale: a large producer of kitchen equipment.
3.of great scope or range; extensive; broad.
4.grand or pompous: a man given to large, bombastic talk.
5.(of a map, model, etc.) representing the features of the original with features of its own that are relatively large so that great detail may be shown. "

Hope this helps
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Re: The architectural problem of how to enclose and articulate interior  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Sep 2015, 16:43
Nice finding. Very difficult to get this difference in allotted time in exam :oops:

daagh can you please help with your take on this question as well.

boomtangboy wrote:
Saurajm wrote:
BigNasty wrote:
Hey,

IMO,

meaning of the sentence - Architectural problem becomes increasingly problematic with the increase in the size of the space.
'Size of the space' - This phrase will give us a 3-2 split. Size can increase or decrease. This eliminates 'A' and 'E'

a) size of the space gets larger -> usage of word 'larger' warrants for a comparison, which the sentence does not make.
b) Correct
c) size of the space will increase - awkward construction
d) as there is an increase - awkward
e) cannot associate larger with a size without making a comparison.

Hope this helps. :)


Yes, but in answer B the word larger disappears, therefore the use of more to make a parallel comparison is not necessary.... I still think IMO is A.


Hi,

Space cant get larger.... Space increases

I hope this is more clear from the below definition (Citation : http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/larger?s=t)
" large  [lahrj] Show IPA adjective, larg·er, larg·est, noun, adverb
adjective
1.of more than average size, quantity, degree, etc.; exceeding that which is common to a kind or class; big; great: a large house; a large number; in large measure; to a large extent.
2.on a great scale: a large producer of kitchen equipment.
3.of great scope or range; extensive; broad.
4.grand or pompous: a man given to large, bombastic talk.
5.(of a map, model, etc.) representing the features of the original with features of its own that are relatively large so that great detail may be shown. "

Hope this helps

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Re: The architectural problem of how to enclose and articulate interior  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Feb 2018, 15:12
Could and Expert please help to choose between A and B?

I chose B purely because - "it sounds better". What is the real grammatical reason?
I presume, something to do with Adverb/adjective, but cannot quite put my finger on it.

Help will be appreciated.

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Re: The architectural problem of how to enclose and articulate interior  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Feb 2018, 15:50
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Hi eybrj2,

Thank you for your question. This is a tricky one, so let's tackle it one problem at a time. When looking over the answers quickly, it's clear there are a couple differences we can address to narrow down answers:

1. the use of "increasingly" vs. "more"
2. the use of "increases" vs. "getting larger"

So the trick with this sentence is to decide which part gets to use the word "increase": the growing intensity of the problem or the change in size of the space. Since it makes more sense to use the word "increase" to show the growing size of the space, let's take out any answers that use a version of "increase" to describe the problem. This means we can rule out answers A & D.

Now that we're left with answers B, C, & D, let's check for one of the most common errors in GMAT sentence correction questions - parallel format. In this case, the parts in bold need to be parallel in format and style to the original verb "becomes." Let's see how they stack up:

(b) becomes / ever more critical as the size of the space increases (CORRECT = parallel format)
(c) becomes / more and more critical as the size of the space will increase (WRONG = not parallel)
(d) becomes / one that is increasingly critical as there is an increase in the size of the space (WRONG = not parallel)

So, based on the more appropriate use of "more" instead of "increases," and based on the correct parallel format, it's clear that B is the correct answer.
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Re: The architectural problem of how to enclose and articulate interior  [#permalink]

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New post 13 May 2018, 06:01
This is a good question that tests the logic behind greater/larger versus increases/decreases. When we compare two entities, then it makes sense to use larger/greater whereas when we compare and entity with itself over a period of time, we use increases/decreases. Hence, B.
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Re: The architectural problem of how to enclose and articulate interior  [#permalink]

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New post 16 May 2018, 17:09
(a) increasingly critical as the size of the space gets larger --- I don't like this structure "as the size of the space gets larger" than what ?
(b) ever more critical as the size of the space increases ---- better construction
(c) more and more critical as the size of the space will increase ---- we need present tense. future tense changed the meaning.
(d) one that is increasingly critical as there is an increase in the size of the space --- very awkward.
(e) more critical with the size of the space getting larger --- not good at all.
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Re: The architectural problem of how to enclose and articulate interior  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2019, 01:03
daagh sir
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How to eliminate A and choose B
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Re: The architectural problem of how to enclose and articulate interior  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2019, 02:55
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When you compare X with Y, you can say x is larger or smaller than Y. However, when you are dealing with only X you can only say X increases or decreases.
A's use of 'larger' makes it flawed.
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Re: The architectural problem of how to enclose and articulate interior   [#permalink] 27 Jan 2019, 02:55
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