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The Swedish warship Vasa, sunk in 1628 and raised in 1961

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The Swedish warship Vasa, sunk in 1628 and raised in 1961 [#permalink]

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The Swedish warship Vasa, sunk in 1628 and raised in 1961, was preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, where low salinity inhibits the growth of marine borers that in most seas devour every exposed scrap of a sunken ship's wooden hull.
(A) was preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, where low salinity inhibits
(B) being preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, because the low salinity there is able to inhibit
(C) and preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, the low salinity there inhibits
(D) having been preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, whose low salinity inhibits
(E) had been preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, because of low salinity there inhibiting
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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The Swedish warship Vasa, sunk in 1628 and raised in 1961 [#permalink]

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New post 12 Nov 2013, 16:30
monirjewel wrote:
The Swedish warship Vasa, sunk in 1628 and raised in 1961, was preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, where low salinity inhibits the growth of marine borers that in most seas devour every exposed scrap of a sunken ship's wooden hull.
(A) was preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, where low salinity inhibits
(B) being preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, because the low salinity there is able to inhibit
(C) and preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, the low salinity there inhibits
(D) having been preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, whose low salinity inhibits
(E) had been preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, because of low salinity there inhibiting

Dear monirjewel,
I'm happy to help with this. :-)

In this sentence, we have a subject, "the Swedish warship Vasa", and then a noun-modifier in the form of two participles in parallel, "sunk in 1628 and raised in 1961", but at that point in the sentence, there's no verb. That noun needs a verb. See:
The Missing Verb Mistake

(A) provides a true verb
(C) makes the mistake of sticking in a conjunction, so we have [noun][participial phrase]"and"[participial phrase], so this is missing a true verb.
Choices (B) & (D) just add on more participial phrases, so in those version, there's no verb in the entire sentence --- the classic form of the "missing verb" mistake.
Choice (E) does provide a true verb, but unnecessarily in the past-perfect tense. Also, the change from a true subordinate clause to a prepositional phrase beginning with "because of" make this very wordy and awkward. This can't be correct.

That's why only (A) could be the answer.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: The Swedish warship Vasa, sunk in 1628 and raised in 1961 [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2017, 03:37
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Re: The Swedish warship Vasa, sunk in 1628 and raised in 1961 [#permalink]

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mikemcgarry wrote:
monirjewel wrote:
The Swedish warship Vasa, sunk in 1628 and raised in 1961, was preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, where low salinity inhibits the growth of marine borers that in most seas devour every exposed scrap of a sunken ship's wooden hull.
(A) was preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, where low salinity inhibits
(B) being preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, because the low salinity there is able to inhibit
(C) and preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, the low salinity there inhibits
(D) having been preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, whose low salinity inhibits
(E) had been preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, because of low salinity there inhibiting

Dear monirjewel,
I'm happy to help with this. :-)

In this sentence, we have a subject, "the Swedish warship Vasa", and then a noun-modifier in the form of two participles in parallel, "sunk in 1628 and raised in 1961", but at that point in the sentence, there's no verb. That noun needs a verb. See:
http://gmat.magoosh.com/lessons/914-the ... rb-mistake

(A) provide a true verb
(C) make the mistake of sticking in a conjunction, so we have [noun][participial phrase]"and"[verb], a classic mistake structure on the GMAT.
Choices (B) & (D) & (E) all just add on more participial phrases, so in those version, there's no verb in the entire sentence --- the classic form of the "missing verb" mistake.
That's why only (A) could be the answer.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Hi Mike,
I think there is typing mistake in your post as option E has verb whereas C doesn't have one.
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Re: The Swedish warship Vasa, sunk in 1628 and raised in 1961 [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2017, 09:28
anje29 wrote:
Hi Mike,
I think there is typing mistake in your post as option E has verb whereas C doesn't have one.

Dear anje29,

You're correct. I modified my post. Thanks for pointing this out.

Mike :-)
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Re: The Swedish warship Vasa, sunk in 1628 and raised in 1961 [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2017, 16:19
mikemcgarry wrote:
monirjewel wrote:
The Swedish warship Vasa, sunk in 1628 and raised in 1961, was preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, where low salinity inhibits the growth of marine borers that in most seas devour every exposed scrap of a sunken ship's wooden hull.
(A) was preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, where low salinity inhibits
(B) being preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, because the low salinity there is able to inhibit
(C) and preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, the low salinity there inhibits
(D) having been preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, whose low salinity inhibits
(E) had been preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, because of low salinity there inhibiting

Dear monirjewel,
I'm happy to help with this. :-)

In this sentence, we have a subject, "the Swedish warship Vasa", and then a noun-modifier in the form of two participles in parallel, "sunk in 1628 and raised in 1961", but at that point in the sentence, there's no verb. That noun needs a verb. See:
The Missing Verb Mistake

(A) provides a true verb
(C) makes the mistake of sticking in a conjunction, so we have [noun][participial phrase]"and"[participial phrase], so this is missing a true verb.
Choices (B) & (D) just add on more participial phrases, so in those version, there's no verb in the entire sentence --- the classic form of the "missing verb" mistake.
Choice (E) does provide a true verb, but unnecessarily in the past-perfect tense. Also, the change from a true subordinate clause to a prepositional phrase beginning with "because of" make this very wordy and awkward. This can't be correct.

That's why only (A) could be the answer.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Dear mikemcgarry

I hope you are well.

I have certain question of the construction "because of + noun + participle". Is this construction always wrong? Is there any exception? if yes, have you seen any OG SC question that used it correctly.

I need your help about one of your article about modification with 'with' and when it is correct or wrong. I remember that I read it once and you nailed the it but I can't locate even with using google.

Thanks in advance

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Re: The Swedish warship Vasa, sunk in 1628 and raised in 1961 [#permalink]

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Mo2men wrote:

Dear mikemcgarry

I hope you are well.

I have certain question of the construction "because of + noun + participle". Is this construction always wrong? Is there any exception? if yes, have you seen any OG SC question that used it correctly.

I need your help about one of your article about modification with 'with' and when it is correct or wrong. I remember that I read it once and you nailed the it but I can't locate even with using google.

Thanks in advance

Dear Mo2men,

How are you my friend? I'm find and I'm happy to respond. :-)

I wouldn't say that this structure is always wrong, categorically wrong. When it's right and wrong, though, is a tricky issue.

You may find this article germane:
with + [noun] + [participle] on GMAT Sentence Correction

One way to say this is that the true object of a preposition is a noun. Of course, this noun can be garnished by any noun modifier, but logic of the preposition should be pointing at the noun itself and this logic should remain intact when we remove the noun modifier.

Consider this not-very-GMAT-like sentence.
The picnic was canceled because of rain coming out of nowhere.
With respect to the issue we are treating here, this sentence is 100% correct. It would work if we completely dropped the noun modifier.
The picnic was canceled because of rain.
The participle modifier provides extra detail, but it is not part of the causation described by the preposition "because of." The cause described by "because of" is clearly the "rain" itself.

Now, another not-very-GMAT-like sentence.
Because of the garbage truck screeching, the baby awoke.
This is not so hot. Here the preposition is, at it were, trying to reach through the noun to get to the action of the noun modifier. The true cause now is the action, and any prepositional phrase is not the right place to put an action. If we drop the the participle, we lose the true cause to which the preposition was trying to point. This is the mistake form. We have to swap out the prepositional phrase for a true subordinate clause:
Because the garbage truck screeched, the baby awoke.
A full clause, either independent or subordinate, is the only appropriate place to put the action of a full verb.

Now, think about (E) in this context:
The Swedish warship Vasa, sunk in 1628 and raised in 1961, had been preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, because of low salinity there inhibiting the growth of marine borers that in most seas devour every exposed scrap of a sunken ship's wooden hull.
The reason that this old wooden hull had been preserved is not simply "low salinity." Instead, it's the fact that "low salinity there inhibits the growth of marine borers." The action is the real reason, so a prepositional phrase is not the correct grammatical structure for identifying this action as the cause.

Off the top of my head, I don't know any official questions that use this structure, but I am sure the GMAT thinks in terms of this distinction.

Does all this make sense, my friend?
Mike :-)
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Re: The Swedish warship Vasa, sunk in 1628 and raised in 1961 [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2017, 16:59
Dear mikemcgarry,

Thanks a lot for your prompt response and thoroughly explanation as always.

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Re: The Swedish warship Vasa, sunk in 1628 and raised in 1961 [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2017, 19:34
monirjewel wrote:
The Swedish warship Vasa, sunk in 1628 and raised in 1961, was preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, where low salinity inhibits the growth of marine borers that in most seas devour every exposed scrap of a sunken ship's wooden hull.
(A) was preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, where low salinity inhibits
(B) being preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, because the low salinity there is able to inhibit
(C) and preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, the low salinity there inhibits
(D) having been preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, whose low salinity inhibits
(E) had been preserved in the cold water of Stockholm harbor, because of low salinity there inhibiting


IMO the trick with sentences like these- with a ton going on- is to just read them quickly in one motion so as to capture the whole meaning of the sentence. Reading this kind of sentence slowly can cause you not only to fumble words but confuse yourself.

A

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Re: The Swedish warship Vasa, sunk in 1628 and raised in 1961   [#permalink] 14 Aug 2017, 19:34
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