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The type of behavior exhibited when an animal recognizes itself in a m

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Re: The type of behavior exhibited when an animal recognizes itself [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2017, 08:03
My reasoning.
A- the two verbs comes and is for subject type of behavior are not corrected properly connected. Two verbs for same subject must be connected using proper parallel connectors.
B- "comma" and is used to connect two independent clause. Here and is not followed by independent clause.
C- "thus it is" and type of behavior comes, the two independent clauses are not connected properly. The correct way to connect two independent clauses is either by using "comma" + FANBOYS or by using semi colon.
E- and so are used together to conenct two independent clause. Also we are talking about the same subject that is type of behavior so there is no need to introduce another independent clause. We can simply take the subject common and connect the two verbs using a parallel connector.
D- fixes all the issues. The two verbs comes and is are connected properly.

I am no expert so let me know in case i missed something or got something incorrect. (:

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SandySilva


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Re: The type of behavior exhibited when an animal recognizes itself in a m [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2017, 10:09
sandysilva wrote:
My reasoning.
A- the two verbs comes and is for subject type of behavior are not corrected properly connected. Two verbs for same subject must be connected using proper parallel connectors.
B- "comma" and is used to connect two independent clause. Here and is not followed by independent clause.
C- "thus it is" and type of behavior comes, the two independent clauses are not connected properly. The correct way to connect two independent clauses is either by using "comma" + FANBOYS or by using semi colon.
E- and so are used together to conenct two independent clause. Also we are talking about the same subject that is type of behavior so there is no need to introduce another independent clause. We can simply take the subject common and connect the two verbs using a parallel connector.
D- fixes all the issues. The two verbs comes and is are connected properly.

I am no expert so let me know in case i missed something or got something incorrect. (:

Sent from my SM-N9007 using GMAT Club Forum mobile app



Hello sandysilva,


I must say you have done a great analysis if this official sentence. Very neat and precise. Keep up the good work. :thumbup:

I would just like to add a few points about the incorrect Choices B and E.


Choice B misses the preposition of after domain. This is incorrect because A is studied in the domain of XYZ. So missing preposition is an additional error in this choice.


Choice E uses the expression it is best to be studied, suggesting that this type of behavior must be studied as part of the field of animal cognition as if it is not studied already in the present.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: The type of behavior exhibited when an animal recognizes itself in a m [#permalink]

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New post 07 Nov 2017, 20:01
This is how i solved this question. So the option B is out because of the missing preposition. The use of pronoun IT in options C and E are incorrect because it can refer to either the behavior or the animal. In between A and D we need AND since the there are two independent clauses. Please correct me if am wrong.

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The type of behavior exhibited when an animal recognizes itself in a m [#permalink]

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New post 08 Nov 2017, 10:54
longhaul123 wrote:
This is how i solved this question. So the option B is out because of the missing preposition. The use of pronoun IT in options C and E are incorrect because it can refer to either the behavior or the animal. In between A and D we need AND since the there are two independent clauses. Please correct me if am wrong.

Dear longhaul123,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

My friend, you are taking an extremely rule-based approach to GMAT SC. While you found the correct answer here, more or less by POE, I think you may be missing the forest for the trees.

I agree that we need "and," so (A) & (C) are out. I disagree that the pronoun "it" is ambiguous in any answer choice. Many elements at many levels inform the pronoun-antecedent relationship, and students often underestimate how much parallelism plays a role in determining this relationship. In particular, when two clauses are in parallel, and the subject of the second clause is a pronoun, this setup strongly suggests that the antecedent is the subject of the first clause. Another factor that influences the pronoun-antecedent relationship rhetoric, in particular, the focus of the sentence. The focus of the first clause is the subject "type of behavior," so it's crystal clear that this is the antecedent of "it."

I would say that (B) & (D) & (E) are all grammatically correct. The GMAT loves to create incorrect answer choices that are grammatically correct, because these befuddle the folks who look only at grammar.

The problem with (B) & (E) is that they are awkward. They both have the awkward structure "so is best to be studied as . . ." That's not grammatically wrong, but it's awkward. It feels off. It is a wordy, weak, sloppy way to convey this information. By contrast, (D) is sleek and elegant.

If you look only at the level of grammar rules, you will miss what the GMAT SC is about. On a correct answer on the GMAT SC, grammar and logic and rhetoric all coherently come together to produce meaning. You have to be thinking at all levels to understand the GMAT SC.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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