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Tornadoes, spiraling around a central eye, are circular storms: SC

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Tornadoes, spiraling around a central eye, are circular storms: SC  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2019, 10:28
1
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A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  15% (low)

Question Stats:

72% (01:16) correct 28% (01:43) wrong based on 136 sessions

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Tornadoes, spiraling around a central eye, are circular storms just as hurricanes are, yet being so much smaller and faster that their paths are unpredictable and those in their path have little time to get out of the way.

A. Tornadoes, spiraling around a central eye, are circular storms just as hurricanes are, yet being
B. Like hurricanes, tornadoes are circular storms, spiraling around a central eye, but they are
C. Although like hurricanes tornadoes are circular storms spiraling around a central eye, yet
D. As hurricanes, tornadoes are circular storms, spiraling around a central eye, but they are
E. Tornadoes are circular storms like hurricanes, spiraling around a central eye bu
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Tornadoes, spiraling around a central eye, are circular storms: SC  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2019, 11:24
1
Tornadoes, spiraling around a central eye, are circular storms just as hurricanes are, yet being so much smaller and faster that their paths are unpredictable and those in their path have little time to get out of the way.

Quote:
A. Tornadoes, spiraling around a central eye, are circular storms just as hurricanes are, yet being

Being is not a working verb. This answer is a sentence fragment. "Yet" is a conjunction that joins two independent clauses. The second clause needs a working verb.
Eliminate

Quote:
B. Like hurricanes, tornadoes are circular storms, spiraling around a central eye, but they are

• Just fine. Like means "similar to" or "resembling."
-- Tornadoes are similar to hurricanes because both are circular storms that spiral around a central eye.
-- but tornadoes are smaller and faster than hurricanes
They logically refers to tornadoes. Tornadoes are similar to hurricanes in one way BUT different [from hurricanes] in another way. Hurricanes cannot be different from themselves.

KEEP

Quote:
C. Although like hurricanes, tornadoes are circular storms spiraling around a central eye, yet

• Fatal error: although and yet are redundant. Logically, the two words create two contrasts.
Although is typically followed by a subject and verb. (Subordinate conjunctions such as although create subordinate clauses. Clauses require a subject and a verb.)
-- The absence of a subject and verb is probably a deal breaker in this case.
-- If it is clear that the phrase means "although they are," GMAC sometimes allows the construction—but in this case the implied word they makes things unclear.
-- Compare to (B). Not nearly as good as (B).
• Subordinate intro clauses need to be set off by a comma.

Eliminate

Quote:
D. As hurricanes, tornadoes are circular storms, spiraling around a central eye, but they are

• Tornadoes are not hurricanes (tornadoes are not equivalent to hurricanes and do not function as hurricanes).
AS hurricanes is confusing.
-- When it is followed only by a noun, the word AS is a preposition.
• When AS is a preposition it can mean
-- stage (of development): as a first-year associate I got baptized by fire;
-- equivalence She treats him as her uncle, though they are not related (him = her uncle); and
-- function (As the president of the Senate, the U.S. Vice President breaks tie votes in that chamber)
• AS can also be a conjunction. If AS is a conjunction, it can be used in comparisons, meaning in the same way that.
-- if AS is used in comparisons as a conjunction, it must be followed by a clause.
-- Well, we seem to have a comparison but we do not have a clause.
• This AS needs a subject and a verb to follow.
The AS errors are fatal

Eliminate

Quote:
E. Tornadoes are circular storms like hurricanes, spiraling around a central eye but [MEANING]

• Not logically possible. "The but clause" = one of them must be smaller than the other is. Which one is smaller? Logically, probably tornadoes, which is the noun being described. Better not to guess. Compare to (B). Option B is far better.
• When using "like" to say that one thing is similar to another, like must be followed by a noun or pronoun. (In other words, this part is correct.)

Eliminate

The answer is B
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Re: Tornadoes, spiraling around a central eye, are circular storms: SC  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2019, 11:30
Tornadoes, spiraling around a central eye, are circular storms just as hurricanes are, yet being[/u] so much smaller and faster that their paths are unpredictable and those in their path have little time to get out of the way.

A. Tornadoes, spiraling around a central eye, are circular storms just as hurricanes are, yet being (JUST AS HURRICANES ,YET BEING -OUCH)
B. Like hurricanes, tornadoes are circular storms, spiraling around a central eye, but they are(OKAY - LIKE SHOULD BE A GOOD WAY OF COMPARING WHICH MEANS HURRICANE AND TORNADOES ARE NOUN HERE -KEEP THIS)
C. Although like hurricanes tornadoes are circular storms spiraling around a central eye, yet (ALTHOUGH - EWW)
D. As hurricanes, tornadoes are circular storms, spiraling around a central eye, but they are (AS ... ?THEY ? )
E. Tornadoes are circular storms like hurricanes, spiraling around a central eye bu(THIS IS NOT PROPER WAY OF COMPARING NOUNS).

answer B
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Re: Tornadoes, spiraling around a central eye, are circular storms: SC  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2019, 11:36
generis wrote:
Tornadoes, spiraling around a central eye, are circular storms just as hurricanes are, yet being so much smaller and faster that their paths are unpredictable and those in their path have little time to get out of the way.

Quote:
A. Tornadoes, spiraling around a central eye, are circular storms just as hurricanes are, yet being

Being is not a working verb. This answer is a sentence fragment. Yet is a conjunction that joins two independent clauses. The second clause needs a working verb.
Eliminate

Quote:
B. Like hurricanes, tornadoes are circular storms, spiraling around a central eye, but they are

• Just fine. They logically refers to tornadoes. Tornadoes are similar to hurricanes in one way BUT different [from hurricanes] in another way.
KEEP

Quote:
C. Although like hurricanes, tornadoes are circular storms spiraling around a central eye, yet

• Fatal error: although and yet are redundant. Logically, the two words create two contrasts.
Although is typically followed by a subject and verb. (Subordinate conjunctions such as although create subordinate clauses. Clauses require a subject and a verb.)
-- The absence of a subject and verb is probably a deal breaker in this case.
-- If it is clear that the phrase means "although they are," GMAC sometimes allows the construction—but in this case the implied word they makes things unclear.
-- Compare to (B). Not nearly as good as (B).
• Subordinate intro clauses need to be set off by a comma.

Eliminate

Quote:
D. As hurricanes, tornadoes are circular storms, spiraling around a central eye, but they are

• Tornadoes are not hurricanes (tornadoes do not function as hurricanes).
• This AS needs a subject and a verb to follow: As are hurricanes. Very awkward, and
• Compared to (B), the antecedent for they is not as clear.

Eliminate

Quote:
E. Tornadoes are circular storms like hurricanes, spiraling around a central eye but [MEANING]

• Not logically possible. "The but clause" = one of them must be smaller than the other is. Which one is smaller? Logically, probably tornadoes, which is the noun being described. Better not to guess. Compare to (B). Option B is far better.
• When using "like" to say that one thing is similar to another, like must be followed by a noun or pronoun. (In other words, this part is correct.)

Eliminate

The answer is B


Could you elaborate on the pronoun ambiguity differences between (B) and (D)

What makes one less ambiguous?
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Re: Tornadoes, spiraling around a central eye, are circular storms: SC  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2019, 02:42
1
ahabib wrote:
generis wrote:
Tornadoes, spiraling around a central eye, are circular storms just as hurricanes are, yet being so much smaller and faster that their paths are unpredictable and those in their path have little time to get out of the way.

Quote:
B. Like hurricanes, tornadoes are circular storms, spiraling around a central eye, but they are

• Just fine. They logically refers to tornadoes. Tornadoes are similar to hurricanes in one way BUT different [from hurricanes] in another way.
KEEP

Quote:
D. As hurricanes, tornadoes are circular storms, spiraling around a central eye, but they are

• Tornadoes are not hurricanes (tornadoes do not function as hurricanes).
• This AS needs a subject and a verb to follow: As are hurricanes. Very awkward, and
• Compared to (B), the antecedent for they is not as clear.

Eliminate


The answer is B


Could you elaborate on the pronoun ambiguity differences between (B) and (D)

What makes one less ambiguous?

Hi ahabib

General confusion in D makes it harder to follow what is going on.

I happened to mention the pronouns in B and D because I was anticipating an onslaught of questions about whether "they" was ambiguous.
I'll eliminate the reference in D. To me, D could be really confusing.
AS is presented as a preposition, but should be a conjunction.
If the whole first clause is a hot mess, I think it's harder to figure out what is going on generally, including what the pronoun is doing.

I am not a fan of pronoun ambiguity. I do not ever eliminate options initially on that basis alone.
I advise aspirants to leave pronoun ambiguity until the very end of analysis, because GMAC tolerates a lot more ambiguity than people realize.

Hope that answer helps. :)
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Re: Tornadoes, spiraling around a central eye, are circular storms: SC   [#permalink] 25 Aug 2019, 02:42
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