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Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the

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Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

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The Official Guide for GMAT Review 2018

Practice Question
Sentence Correction
Question No.: 680


Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are placed at right angles to its front edge.


(A) whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are

(B) with a single set of strings running parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the several sets of strings of the harpsichord are

(C) which has a single set of strings that runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, in the case of the harpsichord, several sets of strings are

(D) which has a single set of strings that run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord has several sets of strings

(E) in which a single set of strings run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are

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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jun 2017, 20:51
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Topic tested: Comparison

Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are placed at right angles to its front edge.

A. whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are - Incorrect.

B. with a single set of strings running parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the several sets of strings of the harpsichord are - Incorrect.

C. which has a single set of strings that runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, in the case of the harpsichord, several sets of strings are - Incorrect.

D. which has a single set of strings that run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord has several sets of strings - Correct.

E. in which a single set of strings run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are - Incorrect.

Answer: D
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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jun 2017, 21:03
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I understand that D is correct since we are comparing virginal to the harpsichord..

but for the SV agreement for "single set of strings that run parallel" is it incorrect to reduce it down to "single set that runs parallel"?
i'm gonna guess that it's the "strings that run parallel" and not the "single set runs parallel"
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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jun 2017, 22:40
dengdatsgood wrote:
I understand that D is correct since we are comparing virginal to the harpsichord..

but for the SV agreement for "single set of strings that run parallel" is it incorrect to reduce it down to "single set that runs parallel"?
i'm gonna guess that it's the "strings that run parallel" and not the "single set runs parallel"


Here 'that' refers to the 'strings'.

IMO we have to check whether the 'set of strings' or 'strings' can run parallel to the front edge of the instrument. The set of strings as well as the strings can run parallel. So we can use the verb depending on the noun we want to refer. If 'that' refers to 'the set' we have to use 'runs'. Here its referring to strings and so we use run.

GMATNinja, your comments?
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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

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A set running parallel to the front edge does not convey the proper meaning since in both cases, it is the strings (plural) that run either along the front edge or perpendicular to the edge. Hence, ' strings that run' is the correct diction
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Originally posted by daagh on 12 Jun 2017, 03:43.
Last edited by daagh on 12 Jun 2017, 21:21, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jun 2017, 04:41
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Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are placed at right angles to its front edge.

(A) whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are – Illogical comparison virginal and harpsichord’s several sets
(B) with a single set of strings running parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the several sets of strings of the harpsichord are – Illogical comparison virginal and sets of strings
(C) which has a single set of strings that runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, in the case of the harpsichord, several sets of strings are – Subject verb agreement – set doesn’t run to front edge but the strings do
(D) which has a single set of strings that run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord has several sets of strings – Correct
(E) in which a single set of strings run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are – Illogical comparison virginal and harpsichord’s several sets
Answer D
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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

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There isn't much to think about in this comparison topic. An instrument by name Virginal has to be parallelly compared with another similar such instrument, namely Harpsichord and only choice D does that. The comparison is faulty in all the other choices. Dump them all wholesale
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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jun 2017, 18:04
Hi Experts,
My query is regarding option (C)
Here that as a subject refers to - single set of strings.
I think we need a singular verb- runs - instead of plural verb - run after that.
WR,
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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2017, 09:42
adkikani wrote:
Hi Experts,
My query is regarding option (C)
Here that as a subject refers to - single set of strings.
I think we need a singular verb- runs - instead of plural verb - run after that.
WR,
Arpit


Hi adkikani ,

'that' in option C is referring to strings. As per the rule of that and which, they should refer to the nearest noun. So, here the nearest noun is strings. Hence, that is referring to it.
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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2017, 10:15
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adkikani wrote:
Hi Experts,
My query is regarding option (C)
Here that as a subject refers to - single set of strings.
I think we need a singular verb- runs - instead of plural verb - run after that.
WR,
Arpit



Hello adkikani /Arpit,

I would be glad to help you out with this one. :)

From the context of the sentence, it is absolutely clear that two kinds of string instruments have been compared. Logically, the strings run on the instruments in a certain way. A set does not run. Hence, whenever a set of strings is mentioned, we need a modifier to modify the strings and not a set. So apart from the comparison error, we can use this point also to arrive at the correct answer choice.

A) whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are: Incorrect
(B) with a single set of strings running parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the several sets of strings of the harpsichord are: Incorrect
(C) which has a single set of strings that runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, in the case of the harpsichord, several sets of strings are: Incorrect
(D) which has a single set of strings that run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord has several sets of strings: Correct
(E) in which a single set of strings run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are: Incorrect


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2017, 17:05
Hi Shraddha,
Yes, your explanation once again proved importance of meaning over grammar.
I was laying much stress on prepositional phrase of strings earlier.
Thanks for your help. :)
WR,Arpit
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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jul 2017, 08:43
without knowing new words, we can infer which is compared with what. we need to compare two things which have springs. so, we know the two thing compared.
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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jul 2017, 12:05
Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are placed at right angles to its front edge.

The non underlined part "Unlike the Virginal" suggest that the comparison is between the virginal and some other musical instrument..so this should be our first split.

Straight away, option A, B and E are out ..
Lets see the balance options now :

(A) whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are
Illogical comparison between the virginal and the "set of strings of harpsichord"..

(B) with a single set of strings running parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the several sets of strings of the harpsichord are
Again same as A

(C) which has a single set of strings that runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, in the case of the harpsichord, several sets of strings are
When we are already given one comparison marker "Unlike" why do we need a separate phrase "in the case of .."
Incorrect again.

(D) which has a single set of strings that run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord has several sets of strings
Correct.
This clearly says "Unlike X, which has bla bla, U has cla cla". Perfect comparison and no redundancy like that in option C.

(E) in which a single set of strings run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are
Again the comparison is between the virginal and the "set of strings of harpsichord"
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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2017, 20:08
Hi Experts,
Please find my analysis below:-

Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are placed at right angles to its front edge.


(A) whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are
=> Illogical comparison between the virginal and the harpsichord’s several sets.

(B) with a single set of strings running parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the several sets of strings of the harpsichord are
=>Illogical comparison between the virginal and the several sets of strings

(C) which has a single set of strings that runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, in the case of the harpsichord, several sets of strings are
=> two comparisons are used "Unlike" and "in the case of ". It is redundant.

(D) which has a single set of strings that run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord has several sets of strings
=> The comparison between the virginal and the harpsichord is absolutely correct. Use of "Which" is absolutely correct.

(E) in which a single set of strings run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are
=> Illogical comparison the virginal and the harpsichord’s several sets. And also use of "in which" is strange.

ANS :- D

Please review and let me know if I am going wrong anywhere
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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Sep 2017, 10:56
AbdurRakib wrote:
The Official Guide for GMAT Review 2018

Practice Question
Sentence Correction
Question No.: 680

Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are placed at right angles to its front edge.

(A) whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are
(B) with a single set of strings running parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the several sets of strings of the harpsichord are
(C) which has a single set of strings that runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, in the case of the harpsichord, several sets of strings are
(D) which has a single set of strings that run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord has several sets of strings
(E) in which a single set of strings run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are



Unlike the Virginal ( Musical instrument) , the Harpsichord ( another instrument )
Clearly D is the answer.

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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2017, 20:40
Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are placed at right angles to its front edge.

A) whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are
A is wrong for two reasons. People are who and things are that or which, so the use of "whose" when referring to the virginal is incorrect. Also, in this case, the prepositional phrase is the subject of the sentence, "single set" its modifier. Thus the verb "run" must be plural instead of singular.

B) with a single set of strings running parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the several sets of strings of the harpsichord are
B is wrong because the phrase between the commas begins with the preposition "with," which in this usage is meant to distinguish between one virginal and another.

C) which has a single set of strings that runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, in the case of the harpsichord, several sets of strings are
C is wrong because if you remove the clause between the commas, the phrase "several sets of strings are" suggests the virginal also has several sets of strings. Plus, the sentence structure is awkward.

D) which has a single set of strings that run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord has several sets of strings
D is the best choice because it states the case with clarity, but the word "that" is required between
"strings" and the verb "are."


E) in which a single set of strings run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are
E is incorrect because it suggests the set of strings are in the virginal, making it an awkward sentence.

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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Nov 2017, 16:13
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AbdurRakib wrote:
The Official Guide for GMAT Review 2018

Practice Question
Sentence Correction
Question No.: 680

Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are placed at right angles to its front edge.

(A) whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are
(B) with a single set of strings running parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the several sets of strings of the harpsichord are
(C) which has a single set of strings that runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, in the case of the harpsichord, several sets of strings are
(D) which has a single set of strings that run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord has several sets of strings
(E) in which a single set of strings run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are


ASIDE: A virginal is a stringed instrument)

The opening phrase "Unlike the virginal..." sets up a COMPARISON.
So, after the modifying phrase "whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument," the part IMMEDIATELY AFTER the comma should be the thing we are COMPARING with a virginal.
IMPORTANT: the two things we're comparing must be logically comparable. So, in this case, we are likely comparing the virginal with some other instrument.

A) Unlike the virginal . . . , the harpsichord’s several sets of strings...
So, we're comparing an instrument (the virginal) with some instrument's set of strings.
This comparison makes no sense.
ELIMINATE A

B) Unlike the virginal . . . , the several sets of strings...
So, we're comparing an instrument (the virginal) with some instrument's set of strings.
This comparison makes no sense.
ELIMINATE B

C) Unlike the virginal . . . , in the case of the harpsichord...
Pure awfulness!
ELIMINATE C

D) Unlike the virginal . . . , the harpsichord...
Great! We're comparing two instruments. This comparison makes sense.
KEEP D

E) Unlike the virginal . . . , the harpsichord’s several sets of strings...
So, we're comparing an instrument (the virginal) with some instrument's sets of strings.
This comparison makes no sense.
ELIMINATE E

Answer: C

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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Nov 2017, 09:16
new words is used to cover the meaning points. dont be scared by new words. instead, focus on the meaning of old words and find the meaning problem.
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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Nov 2017, 10:40
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SudhanshuSingh wrote:
Hi Experts,
Please find my analysis below:-

Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are placed at right angles to its front edge.


(A) whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are
=> Illogical comparison between the virginal and the harpsichord’s several sets.

(B) with a single set of strings running parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the several sets of strings of the harpsichord are
=>Illogical comparison between the virginal and the several sets of strings

(C) which has a single set of strings that runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, in the case of the harpsichord, several sets of strings are
=> two comparisons are used "Unlike" and "in the case of ". It is redundant.

(D) which has a single set of strings that run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord has several sets of strings
=> The comparison between the virginal and the harpsichord is absolutely correct. Use of "Which" is absolutely correct.

(E) in which a single set of strings run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are
=> Illogical comparison the virginal and the harpsichord’s several sets. And also use of "in which" is strange.

ANS :- D

Please review and let me know if I am going wrong anywhere



Hello SudhanshuSingh,

Although a little late, your reply did catch our attention and for the right reason. :-)


Your approach to this official sentence is absolutely correct. This one tests the knowledge of comparison, and your analysis suggests that you understand the concept of Comparison well.


I would just like to correct your understanding of the incorrect Choice C.

Quote:
(C) which has a single set of strings that runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, in the case of the harpsichord, several sets of strings are
=> two comparisons are used "Unlike" and "in the case of ". It is redundant.



There is no redundancy error because of the usage of Unlike and in the case of.

See, redundancy error when two words expressing the meaning are used together to present the same idea. For example:


Although a little late, but your reply did catch our attention.


In the above-mentioned example sentence, both although and but express contrast. Hence, using them together leads to redundancy error.

However, such is not the case with unlike and in the case of because these two expressions do NOT mean the same.


Choice C is incorrect because it again presents illogical comparison between virginal and several sets of strings because this entity is the subject of the independent to which virginal is supposed to be compared.


Choice C: Unlike the virginal, which has a single set of strings that runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, in the case of the harpsichord, several sets of strings are placed at right angles to its front edge.



Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Nov 2017, 13:18
egmat wrote:
SudhanshuSingh wrote:
Hi Experts,
Please find my analysis below:-

Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are placed at right angles to its front edge.


(A) whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are
=> Illogical comparison between the virginal and the harpsichord’s several sets.

(B) with a single set of strings running parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the several sets of strings of the harpsichord are
=>Illogical comparison between the virginal and the several sets of strings

(C) which has a single set of strings that runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, in the case of the harpsichord, several sets of strings are
=> two comparisons are used "Unlike" and "in the case of ". It is redundant.

(D) which has a single set of strings that run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord has several sets of strings
=> The comparison between the virginal and the harpsichord is absolutely correct. Use of "Which" is absolutely correct.

(E) in which a single set of strings run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are
=> Illogical comparison the virginal and the harpsichord’s several sets. And also use of "in which" is strange.

ANS :- D

Please review and let me know if I am going wrong anywhere



Hello SudhanshuSingh,

Although a little late, your reply did catch our attention and for the right reason. :-)


Your approach to this official sentence is absolutely correct. This one tests the knowledge of comparison, and your analysis suggests that you understand the concept of Comparison well.


I would just like to correct your understanding of the incorrect Choice C.

Quote:
(C) which has a single set of strings that runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, in the case of the harpsichord, several sets of strings are
=> two comparisons are used "Unlike" and "in the case of ". It is redundant.



There is no redundancy error because of the usage of Unlike and in the case of.

See, redundancy error when two words expressing the meaning are used together to present the same idea. For example:


Although a little late, but your reply did catch our attention.


In the above-mentioned example sentence, both although and but express contrast. Hence, using them together leads to redundancy error.

However, such is not the case with unlike and in the case of because these two expressions do NOT mean the same.


Choice C is incorrect because it again presents illogical comparison between virginal and several sets of strings because this entity is the subject of the independent to which virginal is supposed to be compared.


Choice C: Unlike the virginal, which has a single set of strings that runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, in the case of the harpsichord, several sets of strings are placed at right angles to its front edge.



Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha



Thanks Shraddha! I can catch the mistake that I made earlier.
It was helpful for me.
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Sudhanshu

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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the &nbs [#permalink] 28 Nov 2017, 13:18

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