GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 21 Jul 2018, 10:43

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 28 Jan 2018
Posts: 114
Location: Taiwan
GPA: 3.34
Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Apr 2018, 05:13
(D) which has a single set of strings that run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord has several sets of strings

Is it because "a single set" doesn't run parallel to the front edge and because the "strings" run parallel
so we use the verb "run" instead of "runs"?
Study Buddy Forum Moderator
User avatar
D
Joined: 04 Sep 2016
Posts: 1103
Location: India
WE: Engineering (Other)
Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Apr 2018, 05:21
lary301254M7 wrote:
(D) which has a single set of strings that run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord has several sets of strings

Is it because "a single set" doesn't run parallel to the front edge and because the "strings" run parallel
so we use the verb "run" instead of "runs"?


The subject for verb - run - is -> pronoun - that - and that refers back to springs. Since springs is a plural noun hence verb - run takes a plural form.

Hope this helps.

Posted from my mobile device
_________________

It's the journey that brings us happiness not the destination.

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 28 Jan 2018
Posts: 114
Location: Taiwan
GPA: 3.34
Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Apr 2018, 05:46
adkikani wrote:
lary301254M7 wrote:
(D) which has a single set of strings that run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord has several sets of strings

Is it because "a single set" doesn't run parallel to the front edge and because the "strings" run parallel
so we use the verb "run" instead of "runs"?


The subject for verb - run - is -> pronoun - that - and that refers back to springs. Since springs is a plural noun hence verb - run takes a plural form.

Hope this helps.

Posted from my mobile device


Doesn't sometimes the word "that", "which" can refer to an even further noun?
I'm asking based on the meaning of the sentence.
I understand that for the most part "that", "which" refer to the immediate preceding noun.
Study Buddy Forum Moderator
User avatar
D
Joined: 04 Sep 2016
Posts: 1103
Location: India
WE: Engineering (Other)
Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Apr 2018, 07:22
lary301254M7

Quote:
Doesn't sometimes the word "that", "which" can refer to an even further noun?
I'm asking based on the meaning of the sentence.
I understand that for the most part "that", "which" refer to the immediate preceding noun.


True when nearest antecedent does not convey intended meaning, then we look for farther noun that pronoun can refer to.

Posted from my mobile device
_________________

It's the journey that brings us happiness not the destination.

Expert Post
e-GMAT Representative
User avatar
G
Joined: 02 Nov 2011
Posts: 2556
Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Apr 2018, 07:56
lary301254M7 wrote:
Doesn't sometimes the word "that", "which" can refer to an even further noun?
I'm asking based on the meaning of the sentence.
I understand that for the most part "that", "which" refer to the immediate preceding noun.




Hello lary301254M7,

I will be glad to help you with this one. :-)

Well yes, your analysis of Choice D is correct. The choice D correctly uses plural verb run because the subject that refers to immediate preceding plural noun entity strings.

It is the strings that run parallel to the front edge of the instruments.

Now, it is true that many a times a noun modifier can refer to a slightly far-away noun. But we only look for far-away noun modification only when the noun modifier fails to logically refer to the immediate preceding noun. But that is not the case in the correct answer choice - Choice D - of this official sentence.

You can review our very popular article to learn when far-away modification works and when it does not:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/noun-modifiers-can-modify-slightly-far-away-noun-135868.html


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
_________________












| '4 out of Top 5' Instructors on gmatclub | 70 point improvement guarantee | www.e-gmat.com

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 16 May 2017
Posts: 15
Location: India
GMAT 1: 770 Q51 V49
WE: Operations (Internet and New Media)
Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Apr 2018, 07:22
egmat wrote:
SudhanshuSingh wrote:
Hi Experts,
Please find my analysis below:-

Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are placed at right angles to its front edge.


(A) whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are
=> Illogical comparison between the virginal and the harpsichord’s several sets.

(B) with a single set of strings running parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the several sets of strings of the harpsichord are
=>Illogical comparison between the virginal and the several sets of strings

(C) which has a single set of strings that runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, in the case of the harpsichord, several sets of strings are
=> two comparisons are used "Unlike" and "in the case of ". It is redundant.

(D) which has a single set of strings that run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord has several sets of strings
=> The comparison between the virginal and the harpsichord is absolutely correct. Use of "Which" is absolutely correct.

(E) in which a single set of strings run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord’s several sets of strings are
=> Illogical comparison the virginal and the harpsichord’s several sets. And also use of "in which" is strange.

ANS :- D

Please review and let me know if I am going wrong anywhere



Hello SudhanshuSingh,

Although a little late, your reply did catch our attention and for the right reason. :-)


Your approach to this official sentence is absolutely correct. This one tests the knowledge of comparison, and your analysis suggests that you understand the concept of Comparison well.


I would just like to correct your understanding of the incorrect Choice C.

Quote:
(C) which has a single set of strings that runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, in the case of the harpsichord, several sets of strings are
=> two comparisons are used "Unlike" and "in the case of ". It is redundant.



There is no redundancy error because of the usage of Unlike and in the case of.

See, redundancy error when two words expressing the meaning are used together to present the same idea. For example:


Although a little late, but your reply did catch our attention.


In the above-mentioned example sentence, both although and but express contrast. Hence, using them together leads to redundancy error.

However, such is not the case with unlike and in the case of because these two expressions do NOT mean the same.


Choice C is incorrect because it again presents illogical comparison between virginal and several sets of strings because this entity is the subject of the independent to which virginal is supposed to be compared.


Choice C: Unlike the virginal, which has a single set of strings that runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, in the case of the harpsichord, several sets of strings are placed at right angles to its front edge.



Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha


Hi Shraddha,

Even I made the same mistake. Thanks for pointing it out.

Regards,
Hitesh
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 08 May 2018
Posts: 5
Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Jul 2018, 23:35
Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord???s several sets of strings are placed at right angles to its front edge.

(A) whose single set of strings runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord???s several sets of strings are
(B) with a single set of strings running parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the several sets of strings of the harpsichord are
(C) which has a single set of strings that runs parallel to the front edge of the instrument, in the case of the harpsichord, several sets of strings are
(D) which has a single set of strings that run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord has several sets of strings
(E) in which a single set of strings run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord???s several sets of strings are


Per my understanding, "that" is a singular pronoun. So the antecedent of "that" should also be singular. But in the OA, the antecedent of that (singular pronoun) is strings (plural antecedent). Please help me understand where i am going wrong....
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 08 May 2018
Posts: 5
Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Jul 2018, 23:44
daagh wrote:
There isn't much to think about in this comparison topic. An instrument by name Virginal has to be parallelly compared with another similar such instrument, namely Harpsichord and only choice D does that. The comparison is faulty in all the other choices. Dump them all wholesale


Hi "daagh"

Per my understanding, that is a singular pronoun and should have a singular antecedent. But "strings" is a plural antecedent here... Please correct me where i m going wrong...
Intern
Intern
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Oct 2016
Posts: 45
Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jul 2018, 23:00
https://youtu.be/3cmo6ccxsNI
_________________

Founder, GMAT Mantra
One to One Live Online GMAT Coaching
8860616050
http://www.gmatmantra.com

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 08 May 2018
Posts: 5
Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jul 2018, 05:57
[quote="GMATmantra"]
The video doesn't answer my query.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 08 May 2018
Posts: 5
Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jul 2018, 06:13
[quote="egmat"]
[quote="adkikani"]


Hi e-gmat,

Can you please throw light on the usage of "that" in option d? Isn't "that" singular by definition?
Expert Post
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 1844
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Jul 2018, 09:11
XYZABCABC wrote:
egmat wrote:
adkikani wrote:


Hi e-gmat,

Can you please throw light on the usage of "that" in option d? Isn't "that" singular by definition?

When "that" is used as a modifier, it can refer to either a singular or plural noun.

Here's a silly example: "The cows that are in my yard are drawing a lot of uncomfortable attention from my neighbors." "That" is clearly describing the cows, a plural noun. And that's absolutely fine.

My hunch is that the confusion might be coming from the fact that the word "that" can also be used as a pronoun. (More on the many uses of "that" in this article and this video.) But in option (D), "that" is just operating as a modifier -- not as a pronoun -- since "that" clearly modifies "strings." Check out the article or the video, and if you still have doubts, let us know.

I hope that helps!
_________________

GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | GMAT blog | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja and @GMATNinjaTwo in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the &nbs [#permalink] 21 Jul 2018, 09:11

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 32 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Unlike the virginal, whose single set of strings runs parallel to the

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Events & Promotions

PREV
NEXT


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.