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Unlike the virginal, whose single set

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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set [#permalink]

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New post 12 Apr 2018, 05:13
(D) which has a single set of strings that run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord has several sets of strings

Is it because "a single set" doesn't run parallel to the front edge and because the "strings" run parallel
so we use the verb "run" instead of "runs"?
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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set [#permalink]

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New post 12 Apr 2018, 05:21
lary301254M7 wrote:
(D) which has a single set of strings that run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord has several sets of strings

Is it because "a single set" doesn't run parallel to the front edge and because the "strings" run parallel
so we use the verb "run" instead of "runs"?


The subject for verb - run - is -> pronoun - that - and that refers back to springs. Since springs is a plural noun hence verb - run takes a plural form.

Hope this helps.

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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set [#permalink]

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New post 12 Apr 2018, 05:46
adkikani wrote:
lary301254M7 wrote:
(D) which has a single set of strings that run parallel to the front edge of the instrument, the harpsichord has several sets of strings

Is it because "a single set" doesn't run parallel to the front edge and because the "strings" run parallel
so we use the verb "run" instead of "runs"?


The subject for verb - run - is -> pronoun - that - and that refers back to springs. Since springs is a plural noun hence verb - run takes a plural form.

Hope this helps.

Posted from my mobile device


Doesn't sometimes the word "that", "which" can refer to an even further noun?
I'm asking based on the meaning of the sentence.
I understand that for the most part "that", "which" refer to the immediate preceding noun.
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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set [#permalink]

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New post 12 Apr 2018, 07:22
lary301254M7

Quote:
Doesn't sometimes the word "that", "which" can refer to an even further noun?
I'm asking based on the meaning of the sentence.
I understand that for the most part "that", "which" refer to the immediate preceding noun.


True when nearest antecedent does not convey intended meaning, then we look for farther noun that pronoun can refer to.

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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set [#permalink]

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New post 12 Apr 2018, 07:56
lary301254M7 wrote:
Doesn't sometimes the word "that", "which" can refer to an even further noun?
I'm asking based on the meaning of the sentence.
I understand that for the most part "that", "which" refer to the immediate preceding noun.




Hello lary301254M7,

I will be glad to help you with this one. :-)

Well yes, your analysis of Choice D is correct. The choice D correctly uses plural verb run because the subject that refers to immediate preceding plural noun entity strings.

It is the strings that run parallel to the front edge of the instruments.

Now, it is true that many a times a noun modifier can refer to a slightly far-away noun. But we only look for far-away noun modification only when the noun modifier fails to logically refer to the immediate preceding noun. But that is not the case in the correct answer choice - Choice D - of this official sentence.

You can review our very popular article to learn when far-away modification works and when it does not:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/noun-modifiers-can-modify-slightly-far-away-noun-135868.html


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: Unlike the virginal, whose single set   [#permalink] 12 Apr 2018, 07:56

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