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Who vs Whom

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New post 16 May 2019, 16:45
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Hi everyone,

Following was a question I came across:

"Neither of my aunts, both of whom visited Venice last spring, want to return"

While I don't have a problem with correcting the underlined part, should the word be who instead of whom because it acts as the subject in the clause?

Thanks in advance!
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New post 16 May 2019, 17:12
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Greedypigeon wrote:
Hi everyone,

Following was a question I came across:

"Neither of my aunts, both of whom visited Venice last spring, want to return"

While I don't have a problem with correcting the underlined part, should the word be who instead of whom because it acts as the subject in the clause?

Thanks in advance!


Hi Greedypigeon , welcome to GMAT Club. :)

The subject is not whom.
Whom is the object of the preposition OF.
The object of a preposition is never the subject of a clause.

The subject of that clause is both. :)

We will see phrases such as some of whom, many of whom, none of whom, or both of whom,
all of which are very common phrase structures in English (I just used one).

Jargon: the pronouns some, many, none and both are called "indefinite pronouns."

The construction of this type of phrase that refers to people is this way:
indefinite pronoun + of + OBJECT pronoun (

Subject pronouns: I, you, he, she, it, we, they
Object pronouns: me, you, him, her, it, us, them, whom

We should think both of whom = both of them
Them is never a subject. Them go to the store. ouch.
Them doesn't actively do anything, ever.

Indefinite pronouns such as both are still pronouns and thus able to function as a subject in the same way that a noun would.

Hope that helps.
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New post 16 May 2019, 17:34
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generis wrote:
Greedypigeon wrote:
Hi everyone,

Following was a question I came across:

"Neither of my aunts, both of whom visited Venice last spring, want to return"

While I don't have a problem with correcting the underlined part, should the word be who instead of whom because it acts as the subject in the clause?

Thanks in advance!


Hi Greedypigeon , welcome to GMAT Club. :)

The subject is not whom.
Whom is the object of the preposition OF.
The object of a preposition is never the subject of a clause.

The subject of that clause is both. :)

We will see phrases such as some of whom, many of whom, none of whom, or both of whom,
all of which are very common phrase structures in English (I just used one).

Jargon: the pronouns some, many, none and both are called "indefinite pronouns."

The construction of this type of phrase is
-- indefinite pronoun + of + OBJECT pronoun

Subject pronouns: I, you, he, she, it, we, they
Object pronouns: me, you, him, her, it, us, them

We should think both of whom = both of them
Them is never a subject. Them go to the store. ouch.
Them doesn't actively do anything, ever.

Indefinite pronouns are still pronouns and thus able to function as a subject in the same way that a noun would.

Hope that helps.


That's a great explanation! Thanks for taking the time out! :)
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New post 16 May 2019, 18:22
Greedypigeon wrote:
That's a great explanation! Thanks for taking the time out! :)

Greedypigeon , you are very welcome.
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New post 23 Aug 2019, 12:09
Quote:
Elderly patients, many of whom take expensive brand-name medications daily, could reduce their medical costs by switching to generic drugs and making lifestyle changes.

So, generis, in the phrase mentioned above, the subject in the modifier clause is = 'Many', the preposition = 'of', and the object of the preposition is = 'Whom', like the way you explained in this post huh?

Source - Manhattan GMAT
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New post 23 Aug 2019, 16:38
sharathnair14 wrote:
Quote:
Elderly patients, many of whom take expensive brand-name medications daily, could reduce their medical costs by switching to generic drugs and making lifestyle changes.

So, generis, in the phrase mentioned above, the subject in the modifier clause is = 'Many', the preposition = 'of', and the object of the preposition is = 'Whom', like the way you explained in this post huh?

Source - Manhattan GMAT

sharathnair14 , you have an expressive personality, which is a good quality. :lol: :lol:

"Huh?" used this way could mean:
-- Are you out of your mind? (You're talking nonsense.)

-- WTH are you talking about in that post? (You may be talking sense, but I do not understand!)

-- Yes? (Did I state those items correctly?)

Don't change a word. The laugh was much needed, and I'm laughing because I was kinda shocked -- I took it the first way initially.

YES, what you have written is accurate.

Just one detail, probably obvious to you: whom refers to "elderly patients."
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New post 23 Aug 2019, 23:48
Glad you found it funny generis

:-D :-D
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Who vs Whom   [#permalink] 23 Aug 2019, 23:48
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