Last visit was: 23 Jul 2024, 13:22 It is currently 23 Jul 2024, 13:22
Close
GMAT Club Daily Prep
Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History
Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.
Close
Request Expert Reply
Confirm Cancel
SORT BY:
Date
Tags:
Show Tags
Hide Tags
User avatar
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
Joined: 01 Aug 2008
Posts: 330
Own Kudos [?]: 4671 [130]
Given Kudos: 99
Send PM
Most Helpful Reply
User avatar
Director
Director
Joined: 07 Nov 2007
Posts: 717
Own Kudos [?]: 3086 [27]
Given Kudos: 5
Location: New York
Send PM
User avatar
Director
Director
Joined: 17 Feb 2010
Posts: 632
Own Kudos [?]: 3301 [8]
Given Kudos: 6
Send PM
General Discussion
User avatar
Director
Director
Joined: 18 May 2008
Posts: 695
Own Kudos [?]: 2865 [3]
Given Kudos: 0
Send PM
Re: According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax [#permalink]
3
Kudos
Clearly proposal is to be enacted. Hence, C, D and E are out. b/w A and B, 'proposal of taxing' is awkward in B

ugimba wrote:
48. According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax away all capital gains on short-term investments would, if enacted, have a disastrous effect on Wall Street trading and employment.
(A) its merits, the proposal to tax
(B) its merits may be, the proposal of taxing
(C) its merits as a proposal, taxing
(D) the proposal’s merits, to tax
(E) the proposal’s merits are, taxing

Can some one explain what is wrong with E here .... (so obviously E is not the OA :) )
avatar
Intern
Intern
Joined: 30 Oct 2015
Posts: 10
Own Kudos [?]: 1 [1]
Given Kudos: 1
Send PM
Re: According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax [#permalink]
1
Kudos
Proposal ..., if enacted.. is correct
A is the best

E suggests that .. taxing.., if enacted.. thats wrong.
_________________
Retired Moderator
Joined: 19 Mar 2014
Posts: 815
Own Kudos [?]: 981 [2]
Given Kudos: 199
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, Entrepreneurship
GPA: 3.5
Send PM
Re: According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax [#permalink]
2
Kudos
According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax away all capital gains on short-term investments would, if enacted, have a disastrous effect on Wall Street trading and employment.

(A) its merits, the proposal to tax
(B) its merits may be, the proposal of taxing
(C) its merits as a proposal, taxing
(D) the proposal’s merits, to tax
(E) the proposal’s merits are, taxing


A clear precedent to ‘have’ is needed. The disastrous effects would be of ‘the proposal’ and not its merits. Hence, we need an option that contains proposal.
D and E can be eliminated due to the usage of “proposal’s merits” rather than ‘proposal’.
C makes ‘taxing’ the subject and thus, should be eliminated.
B is unnecessarily wordy.
A is the best choice here.
Director
Director
Joined: 21 Jun 2017
Posts: 632
Own Kudos [?]: 540 [0]
Given Kudos: 4092
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, Economics
GMAT 1: 660 Q49 V31
GMAT 2: 620 Q47 V30
GMAT 3: 650 Q48 V31
GPA: 3.1
WE:Corporate Finance (Non-Profit and Government)
Send PM
According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax [#permalink]
Is proposal of taxing unidiomatic ?

proposal to is correct idiom ?

Please guide daagh sir :)

Also, what is your take on A vs B ?
Manager
Manager
Joined: 15 Nov 2017
Status:Current Student
Posts: 232
Own Kudos [?]: 372 [0]
Given Kudos: 28
Concentration: Operations, Marketing
WE:Operations (Retail)
Send PM
Re: According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax [#permalink]
ShankSouljaBoi wrote:
Is proposal of taxing unidiomatic ?

proposal to is correct idiom ?

Please guide daagh sir :)

Also, what is your take on A vs B ?


Hi, Pls allow me to pitch in here. daagh can pls confirm whether am I following the correct line of reasoning

Proposal to- shows the intention i.e. the proposal intends to something
Also, According to some analysts has to modify proposal and hence the usage in C, D and E is wrong.

Rather I have my own small doubt here about the construction, request daagh to shed some light - is not "whatever its merits may be" the correct usage over "whatever its merits"
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Status: enjoying
Posts: 5264
Own Kudos [?]: 42142 [4]
Given Kudos: 422
Location: India
WE:Education (Education)
Send PM
Re: According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax [#permalink]
3
Kudos
1
Bookmarks
Expert Reply
Top Contributor
I think Agg is correct in saying 'to tax' is idiomatic while the proposal of taxing is unidiomatic. Proposal of taxing may mislead to mean, that it is the taxing's proposal. The second point is not critical. As long as the meaning is clear, the more concise version is to be preferred
Intern
Intern
Joined: 13 Dec 2018
Posts: 10
Own Kudos [?]: 9 [0]
Given Kudos: 460
Send PM
Re: According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax [#permalink]
If "simple past" then "simple past (fact/habit)" or
If "simple past" then "would-verb (uncertainty)"

The question falls in to the second category,

If "the proposal is enacted", then "the proposal would have a disastrous effect..."

So option A is correct
Intern
Intern
Joined: 25 Jun 2019
Posts: 1
Own Kudos [?]: 3 [3]
Given Kudos: 34
Send PM
Re: According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax [#permalink]
3
Kudos
What is the function of "whatever its merits" phrase? How do I know that it should not have a verb?
Manager
Manager
Joined: 06 Apr 2022
Posts: 124
Own Kudos [?]: 13 [1]
Given Kudos: 22
Send PM
Re: According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax [#permalink]
1
Kudos
ugimba wrote:
According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax away all capital gains on short-term investments would, if enacted, have a disastrous effect on Wall Street trading and employment.


(A) its merits, the proposal to tax

(B) its merits may be, the proposal of taxing

(C) its merits as a proposal, taxing

(D) the proposal’s merits, to tax

(E) the proposal’s merits are, taxing


D, and E change the subject from "proposal" to "merits", the focus is "The proposal... would have a disastrous effect..."

C is similar to D, and E in that the subject "taxing" is incorrect

B use "of taxing" is incorrect

A remains and is the most correct
Intern
Intern
Joined: 23 May 2022
Posts: 2
Own Kudos [?]: 0 [0]
Given Kudos: 115
Send PM
Re: According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax [#permalink]
@gmatninja@daagh The question mentions 'have' so it must have a plural antecedent.
The subject proposal is singular, so 'have' refers to which noun?
Manager
Manager
Joined: 24 Dec 2021
Posts: 56
Own Kudos [?]: 39 [1]
Given Kudos: 96
Location: India
Concentration: Marketing, Finance
WE:Research (Investment Banking)
Send PM
According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax [#permalink]
1
Kudos
Mansimathur
The appositive phrase, enclosed in commas, presents information that is not essential to the author.
The appositive phrase is a noun phrase and it refers to the noun "the proposal".
It is not imperative for it to contain a verb, it can modify a noun very well without a verb. You can say it is a noun phrase modifying a noun, and noun phrases don't have to contain a verb, though there can be an action described by a gerund.

To tax vs For taxing, infinitives vs gerunds
To tax denotes intent

For Taxing denotes some 'action' of taxing by someone authorized to do so but the sentence here is about the "purpose" the intent of the law, hence an infinitive is warranted here.

Originally posted by chaitanyapatil on 24 May 2022, 12:18.
Last edited by chaitanyapatil on 04 Jun 2022, 20:22, edited 4 times in total.
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Status: GMAT/GRE/LSAT tutors
Posts: 6991
Own Kudos [?]: 64575 [0]
Given Kudos: 1824
Location: United States (CO)
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170

GRE 2: Q170 V170
Send PM
Re: According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax [#permalink]
Expert Reply
Kashish29 wrote:
@gmatninja@daagh The question mentions 'have' so it must have a plural antecedent.
The subject proposal is singular, so 'have' refers to which noun?

The helping verb "would" changes the conjugation of the main verb. We could write "Tim has indigestion," or "Tim would have indigestion if he consumes 1500 deep-fried jalapeños."

This one is like the second example, "The proposal... would have."

I hope that clears things up!
Intern
Intern
Joined: 07 Dec 2021
Posts: 18
Own Kudos [?]: 7 [0]
Given Kudos: 450
Send PM
Re: According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax [#permalink]
ugimba wrote:
According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax away all capital gains on short-term investments would, if enacted, have a disastrous effect on Wall Street trading and employment.


(A) its merits, the proposal to tax

(B) its merits may be, the proposal of taxing

(C) its merits as a proposal, taxing

(D) the proposal’s merits, to tax

(E) the proposal’s merits are, taxing


POE
1. The main subject is the 'proposal'....if enacted. Eliminate C,D,E
2. Of taxing vs to tax - of taxing -unidiomatic: to tax- idiomatic.
Eliminate-B
3. Answer- A

Posted from my mobile device
VP
VP
Joined: 15 Dec 2016
Posts: 1352
Own Kudos [?]: 221 [0]
Given Kudos: 188
Send PM
According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax [#permalink]
zhanbo - how would go about eleminating ?

People are eliminating (c), (d) and (e) because they ask themselves the question : what is enacted ?

To me, both can be enacted
(i) Taxing (the act of taxing) capital gains -- can be enacted
(ii) The proposal -- can be enacted

Thus i could not eliminate (C), (d) and (e)
VP
VP
Joined: 27 Feb 2017
Posts: 1472
Own Kudos [?]: 2326 [0]
Given Kudos: 114
Location: United States (WA)
GMAT 1: 760 Q50 V42
GMAT 2: 760 Q50 V42
GRE 1: Q169 V168

GRE 2: Q170 V170
Send PM
Re: According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax [#permalink]
jabhatta2, here is how I ended up choosing (A). The last two contestants for me are (A) and (E).

(B) The correct idiom is "proposal to do something" instead of "proposal of doing something".
(C) "whatever its merits as a proposal" does not make sense: it means we can treat / regard some merits as a proposal, but merits and a proposal are not compatible.
(D) "to tax ...., if enacted": I feel that we can enact a proposal (or, to a lesser degree, taxing), but not "to tax". Also, check the discussion for (E).
(E) "to enact taxing" might work. After comparing (A) and (E) more carefully, I notice that
> In (A), "its" has clear antecedent. Nothing wrong with (A).
> In (E), however, definite article "the" in "the proposal" should be used to indicate that we are talking about a specific proposal. Typically, the first time a proposal is mentioned, we use indefinite article "a proposal"; thereafter "the proposal" can be used to refer to the previously-mentioned proposal. The problem with (E) (as well as with (D)) is that "the proposal" is used right away without introducing "a proposal" elsewhere first. While readers can figure out that "the proposal" likely means "taxing away all capital gains on short-term investments", it is not specifically put forward as "a proposal", thus making the use of "the proposal" suspicious.
VP
VP
Joined: 15 Dec 2016
Posts: 1352
Own Kudos [?]: 221 [0]
Given Kudos: 188
Send PM
According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax [#permalink]
zhanbo wrote:
jabhatta2, here is how I ended up choosing (A). The last two contestants for me are (A) and (E).

(B) The correct idiom is "proposal to do something" instead of "proposal of doing something".


Hi zhanbo - quick followup on this idiom

From a logical perspective - is there a reason for why "proposal of doing something" DOES NOT work ?

I dont want to memorize idioms as i dont believe the GMAT is a test of memory.

I see Daaghs response here as to the logical reason for why "proposal of doing something" DOES not work.

Just curious on your thoughts.


Also -- what about "idea" or "suggestion". Is "idea of driving" also wrong

Quote:
(i) The Idea of driving from NYC to California is ridiculous
(ii) The Idea to drive from NYC to California is ridiculous


Quote:
(i) The suggestion of driving from NYC to California is ridiculous
(ii) The suggestion to drive from NYC to California is ridiculous

Originally posted by jabhatta2 on 31 Jul 2022, 07:51.
Last edited by jabhatta2 on 04 Aug 2022, 08:59, edited 2 times in total.
VP
VP
Joined: 15 Dec 2016
Posts: 1352
Own Kudos [?]: 221 [0]
Given Kudos: 188
Send PM
According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax [#permalink]
zhanbo wrote:
(D) "to tax ...., if enacted": I feel that we can enact a proposal (or, to a lesser degree, taxing), but not "to tax". Also, check the discussion for (E).
(E) "to enact taxing" might work. After comparing (A) and (E) more carefully, I notice that
> In (A), "its" has clear antecedent. Nothing wrong with (A).
> In (E), however, definite article "the" in "the proposal" should be used to indicate that we are talking about a specific proposal. Typically, the first time a proposal is mentioned, we use indefinite article "a proposal"; thereafter "the proposal" can be used to refer to the previously-mentioned proposal.The problem with (E) (as well as with (D)) is that "the proposal" is used right away without introducing "a proposal" elsewhere first. While readers can figure out that "the proposal" likely means "taxing away all capital gains on short-term investments", it is not specifically put forward as "a proposal", thus making the use of "the proposal" suspicious.


Hi zhanbo - thank you for your analysis on (E) : I am not sure I understand what is making "the proposal" suspicious. Could you help clarify.

Are you saying that "The proposal" in (D) and in (E) (marked in red below in my diagram)
MAY NOT BE THE SAME
Proposal mentioned in the blue clause ?

Is that why "The proposal" is suspicious because the proposal in the blue is referring to ANOTHER proposal ?

I see your comments in the green text BUT it seems very formulaic - not sure if i can use the bit in the green as a take-away
Attachments

screenshot 2.png
screenshot 2.png [ 50.52 KiB | Viewed 8199 times ]

GMAT Club Bot
According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax [#permalink]
 1   2   
Moderators:
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
6991 posts
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
236 posts