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Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his mov

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Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his mov  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 29 Nov 2018, 23:16
3
15
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A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

56% (00:42) correct 44% (00:50) wrong based on 1102 sessions

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Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his movie set designs, including those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will remember him as the architect of the Transamerica Tower, the Malibu campus of Pepperdine University, and the city of Irvine.


A. including those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will

B. like those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations

C. like that for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will

D. including that for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will

E. including those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations

Originally posted by FN on 18 Jun 2008, 12:36.
Last edited by Bunuel on 29 Nov 2018, 23:16, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his mov  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jun 2008, 12:43
A for me.

a. including those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will
b. like those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations
like is not correct here and will is missing in the end
c. like that for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will
that refers to like
d. including that for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will
doubtful but prefers A over this.
e. including those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations
missing will
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Re: Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his mov  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jun 2008, 13:08
1
fresinha12 wrote:
Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his movie set designs, including those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will remember him as the architect of the Transamerica Tower, the Malibu campus of Pepperdine University, and the city of Irvine.

a. including those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will
b. like those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations
c. like that for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will
d. including that for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will
e. including those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations


Between B and E...I will go with B, Like that of the 1942 film is actually a representative example...and like sounds better than including in this scenario...
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Re: Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his mov  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Aug 2009, 04:26
1
we need to use future tense, so answers without "will' are elimineted (A and C are out)
"movie set designs" is plural noun, so we eliminate answers with "that" , 'those' is needed( B and D are out)
E is left, thus correct IMO
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Re: Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his mov  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Dec 2011, 09:15
Yes indeed Stacey prefers future tense, but one small doubt.

William designed the sets in 1942. Now we are talking about future generations of current times i.e., 2011, with a good eighty years flown in between. Now if the future generations of our times will remember him as an architect, How will you describe the remembrance of the people in the interregnum, say in the 1950’s, 1960’s, or 1980’s? (some of whom may not be alive today) Should we use a future tense for them too as of today ? IMO, the future generations points to the future generations after 1942, in which case, we should be happy with using an eternal present - tense verb 'remember' as done in A
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Re: Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his mov  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jan 2015, 09:31
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daagh wrote:
Yes indeed Stacey prefers future tense, but one small doubt.

William designed the sets in 1942. Now we are talking about future generations of current times i.e., 2011, with a good eighty years flown in between. Now if the future generations of our times will remember him as an architect, How will you describe the remembrance of the people in the interregnum, say in the 1950’s, 1960’s, or 1980’s? (some of whom may not be alive today) Should we use a future tense for them too as of today ? IMO, the future generations points to the future generations after 1942, in which case, we should be happy with using an eternal present - tense verb 'remember' as done in A


Sorry to bring up a rather old post. This is the very first example in the MGMAT guide and I hate the fact that I have a problem with their answer.
I have the same reasoning as daagh above.
"Future generations" could refer to people of post-1947 era, whereas the speaker of the sentence could be basing the entire sentence on the present day. In that case, why do we need "will"?
The only argument I have in support of "will remember" is that if my reasoning were true, "later generations" would have been preferable. However, I find that too small a nitpick.
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Re: Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his mov  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Apr 2016, 22:06
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Can someone please tell me how we know that "that", "those" is referring to the movie set designs? I know the OA is E but that/those could might as well be referring to recognition, in which the case the answer could be B.
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Re: Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his mov  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Apr 2016, 10:44
abypatra wrote:
Can someone please tell me how we know that "that", "those" is referring to the movie set designs? I know the OA is E but that/those could might as well be referring to recognition, in which the case the answer could be B.


It is generally wrong in GMAT to introduce an example using "like". Thus an example of recognition should have been introduced with "such as".
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Re: Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his mov  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Mar 2017, 08:56
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My one doubt: Does choice A contain the word 'will' It should going by the underlined part in the prompt. Many transcripts do not seem to carry the "will, straight away rejecting choice A. If you are bent upon using the "will" then future generations 'would' remember might be more grammatical.
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Re: Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his mov  [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2017, 05:28
marshpa wrote:
A for me.

a. including those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will
b. like those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations
like is not correct here and will is missing in the end
c. like that for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will
that refers to like
d. including that for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will
doubtful but prefers A over this.
e. including those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations
missing will


why you picked those over that. thank you.
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Re: Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his mov  [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2017, 05:58
saarthak299 wrote:
marshpa wrote:
A for me.

a. including those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will
b. like those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations
like is not correct here and will is missing in the end
c. like that for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will
that refers to like
d. including that for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will
doubtful but prefers A over this.
e. including those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations
missing will


why you picked those over that. thank you.



Hi saarthak299 ,

'Those' is picked over 'that' because we are talking about plural 'designs'.

Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his movie set designs, including those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild

It means the designs we are mentioning include the designs of 1942 film.

I hope that makes sense.
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Re: Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his mov  [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2017, 09:36
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Perhaps a single set for a film that runs for 90 to 120 minutes is structurally feasible like the mono - acting films of Shakespearean plays of the past, but how logical is that single set feature? This is where meaning comes into practical play in GMAT questions. 'Those' is the logical preference over 'that'.
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Re: Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his mov  [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2017, 11:21
daagh wrote:
Perhaps a single set for a film that runs for 90 to 120 minutes is structurally feasible like the mono - acting films of Shakespearean plays of the past, but how logical is that single set feature? This is where meaning comes into practical play in GMAT questions. 'Those' is the logical preference over 'that'.


Thanks for this clarification.
Well, looks like, in this case, the question expects us to know the nuances of film-making..or I may be too dumb.
My understanding was that you could have one big "set" for a movie with many "scenes" filmed inside the same set. For example, a quick search found this article:
Bizarre things that happened on the set of Harry Potter
Read More: http://www.grunge.com/36078/strange-thi ... paign=clip

Note that the headline says: set not sets.
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Re: Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his mov  [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2017, 18:33
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sevenplusplus

Yes, the caption says set, but strangely the lengthy article itself does not say 'set', at least as far as I could dabble. This tempts me to think that all of the Harry Potter films were shot on one single set because the title says just 'set'. The article describes many scenes that include a train, a drowning, a tall tree, and a fire accident and so on

Alternatively, is the use of set so idiomatic that we take 'set' as the collective noun for a variety of scenes and move on?

I used to believe at some point in the past that journalistic reporting was superior to GMAT until I saw several goof-ups by journalists
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Re: Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his mov  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Aug 2017, 19:16
FN wrote:
Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his movie set designs, including those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will remember him as the architect of the Transamerica Tower, the Malibu campus of Pepperdine University, and the city of Irvine.

a. including those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will
b. like those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations
c. like that for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will
d. including that for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will
e. including those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations


Between A and D, what is the difference? That and those, please advice on how to use the two. And, why is THOSE incorrect, here. :)

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Re: Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his mov  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Aug 2017, 21:22
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rekha

It may be noted here that 'set' is an adjective for the plural noun 'designs'. Therefore, 'that' has no reference. The singular ' that' cannot stand for the plural designs.
'That' as a subordinate conjunction can stand as the connector for the following clause, in which case it can take both singular or plural things.
Example: Retail sales rose 8/10 of 1 percent in August, intensifying expectations that personal spending in the July-September quarter more than doubled
Here you can see that 'those' doesn't gel in spite of the plural 'expectations'. The take away is: if there is a clause after 'that', do not bother about using 'that'

P.S; Are you sure 'those ' as in A is incorrect?
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Re: Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his mov  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Oct 2017, 20:18
Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his movie set designs, including those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will remember him as the architect of the Transamerica Tower, the Malibu campus of Pepperdine University, and the city of Irvine.

a. including those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will
b. like those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations
c. like that for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will
d. including that for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations will
e. including those for the 1942 film “Reap the Wild Wind,” future generations

My reasoning:
In this question, those refers to designs, and including modifies designs.
B. like those - the only possibility for this to be correct is if like those refers to recognition. Those cannot refer to recognition. like those cannot refer to designs because question intends to show that the 1942 film designs are of Pereira's.
C. like that cannot refer to designs. Also, that cannot refer to recognition because the first clause is about recognition for designs, the the second clause must be parallel. "like that" would imply that the 1942 reap the wild wind is about recognition and not designs. While parallelism requires it to refer to designs of 1942 film.
D. same explanation as above. that can only refer to recognition, and this is not the intention as per C.
E. will is missing.
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Re: Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his mov  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2017, 04:51
In case if its helpful.

Including here is not acting as a verbing modifier but rather for giving examples. Ex Such as.

Also in that context those is referring to movie set designs and "those" would be the correct pronoun usage.

https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/foru ... t3005.html
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Although William Pereira first gained national recognition for his mov  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2018, 12:51

Manhattan Official Explanation:



(A) CORRECT. The original sentence is correct as written.

(B) The word “like” is used incorrectly to introduce an example. Using “like” alters the meaning of the sentence, implying that William Pereira’s designs were simply “similar to” the designs for “Reap the Wind.” It is preferable to use the word “including.” The present tense “remember” is incorrectly used with the subject “future generations.” The original sentence was correct to use the future tense “will remember.”

(C) The word “like” is used incorrectly to introduce an example. Using “like” alters the meaning of the sentence, implying that William Pereira’s designs were simply “similar to” the designs for “Reap the Wind.” It is preferable to use the word “including.” The antecedent of the pronoun “that” is the plural “movie set designs,” so the plural pronoun “those” should have been used.

(D) The antecedent of the pronoun “that” is the plural “movie set designs,” so the plural pronoun “those” should have been used.

(E) The present tense “remember” is incorrectly used with the subject “future generations.” The original sentence was correct to use the future tense “will remember.”
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