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As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial

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As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial [#permalink]

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As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial use should not be thought of as limited by the quantity of copper deposits, known or unknown. The transmutation of one chemical element into another is a modern reality, through the methods of nuclear physics. Therefore, the quantity of a natural resource such as copper cannot be calculated even in principle, because copper can be made from other metals.

Which of the following, if true, is the strongest argument against the argument above?

A) Although it is possible that additional deposits of copper will be found, geological considerations strongly indicate that they will not amount to more than fifty-year supply.
B) The production of copper from other metals in industrial quantities would be prohibitively expensive in energy and materials.
C) Synthetic materials have been discovered that can serve as practical substitutes for copper in most of its uses.
D) It will be impractical, in the foreseeable future, to mine any deposits of metal that may exist on the moon or on other planets.
E) Methods for estimating the amount of copper available in currently known deposits have become very sophisticated and have proved some accurate
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Last edited by carcass on 11 Jul 2015, 17:56, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial [#permalink]

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The transmutation of one chemical element into another is a modern reality, through the methods of nuclear physics. - So,B argues that, no it is expensive to mine using other materials, so therefore we should calculate Cu as its available.

Answer: B) The production of copper from other metals in industrial quantities would be prohibitively expensive in energy and materials.

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Re: As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial [#permalink]

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New post 06 Nov 2010, 12:42
amma4u wrote:
The transmutation of one chemical element into another is a modern reality, through the methods of nuclear physics. - So,B argues that, no it is expensive to mine using other materials, so therefore we should calculate Cu as its available.

Answer: B) The production of copper from other metals in industrial quantities would be prohibitively expensive in energy and materials.



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Re: As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial [#permalink]

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New post 07 Nov 2010, 09:41
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Re: As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2015, 09:23
Can anyone explain what is wrong with E.
The conclusion says: "Therefore, the quantity of a natural resource such as copper cannot be calculated even in principle,..."
E directly weakens it by saying that the methods to calculate copper have become very accurate and so it can be calculated.

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Re: As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial [#permalink]

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Look at the conclusion

Copper can be made from other materials.

Now you need to find a reasoning that helps you to say: that's not true. The only way to weaken the argument is choice B. To make copper from other material is an expensive process.

E is wrong because talks about the estimation of the amount of copper and how it is become sophisticated. But E does not help to weaken out conclusion. E is far apart from out primary scope

Hope this helps

regards
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As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial [#permalink]

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New post 18 Nov 2015, 20:36
I do not agree with the above comment.
the conclusion is : Quantity of cooper cannot be estimated.

B doesn't say that it cannot be made
if something is expensive, that does not mean it cannot be still made, while E clearly says that the Q can be estimated.

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Re: As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial [#permalink]

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New post 18 Nov 2015, 22:37
carcass wrote:
Look at the conclusion

Copper can be made from other materials.

Now you need to find a reasoning that helps you to say: that's not true. The only way to weaken the argument is choice B. To make copper from other material is an expensive process.

E is wrong because talks about the estimation of the amount of copper and how it is become sophisticated. But E does not help to weaken out conclusion. E is far apart from out primary scope

Hope this helps

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Why not D it says metals are limited on planet earth and exploration on other moons is not possible for now?

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Re: As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial [#permalink]

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New post 21 Nov 2015, 03:46
Hi all , i really got confused with such OA. money wise is not mentioned in the argument. please experts clarify

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Re: As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial [#permalink]

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New post 22 Nov 2015, 14:05
I also didn't understand why the OA ia letter B.

The issue is not about HOW MUCH it will cost to produce copper from other sources, it is about HOW MANY copper is available. It can be costly, but if it is possible to produce, then it would count as copper available to be used. Therefore, it is strange that the answer is B.

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As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial [#permalink]

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New post 21 Mar 2016, 19:26
douglasvg wrote:
I also didn't understand why the OA ia letter B.

The issue is not about HOW MUCH it will cost to produce copper from other sources, it is about HOW MANY copper is available. It can be costly, but if it is possible to produce, then it would count as copper available to be used. Therefore, it is strange that the answer is B.


agree with you. bumped into this one again...definitely not a good question for practice.
apollo mission was prohibitively expensive, yet human flew to the moon because "who gets first" was more important than the $$...
so B definitely is not a good answer.

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Re: As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial [#permalink]

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New post 02 Apr 2016, 07:15
carcass wrote:
Look at the conclusion

Copper can be made from other materials.

Now you need to find a reasoning that helps you to say: that's not true. The only way to weaken the argument is choice B. To make copper from other material is an expensive process.

E is wrong because talks about the estimation of the amount of copper and how it is become sophisticated. But E does not help to weaken out conclusion. E is far apart from out primary scope

Hope this helps

regards



I feel that the conclusion is - Therefore, the quantity of a natural resource such as copper cannot be calculated even in principle
Premise would be - 1) because copper can be made from other metals, and
2) The transmutation of one chemical element into another is a modern reality, through the methods of nuclear physics.

Therefore, E) Methods for estimating the amount of copper available in currently known deposits have become very sophisticated and have proved some accurate - which weakens the conclusion that copper cannot be counted.

My answer is E)

Not sure how to arrive at the correct solution. Please suggest.

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Re: As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial [#permalink]

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MeghaP wrote:
carcass wrote:
Look at the conclusion

Copper can be made from other materials.

Now you need to find a reasoning that helps you to say: that's not true. The only way to weaken the argument is choice B. To make copper from other material is an expensive process.

E is wrong because talks about the estimation of the amount of copper and how it is become sophisticated. But E does not help to weaken out conclusion. E is far apart from out primary scope

Hope this helps

regards



I feel that the conclusion is - Therefore, the quantity of a natural resource such as copper cannot be calculated even in principle
Premise would be - 1) because copper can be made from other metals, and
2) The transmutation of one chemical element into another is a modern reality, through the methods of nuclear physics.

Therefore, E) Methods for estimating the amount of copper available in currently known deposits have become very sophisticated and have proved some accurate - which weakens the conclusion that copper cannot be counted.

My answer is E)

Not sure how to arrive at the correct solution. Please suggest.


Hi,

the conclusion is :-


Therefore, the quantity of a natural resource such as copper cannot be calculated even in principle, because copper can be made from other metals.

and the argument is:-


we do not require to know the copper deposits as copper can be made from other metal and therefore the deposits are not the only source..

lets see what E does


E) Methods for estimating the amount of copper available in currently known deposits have become very sophisticated and have proved some accurate ..
the argument never Qs the methods of estimating the deposits. The argument maintains that we donot require to CALCULATE it in first place as copper can be produced from other metals so the actual calculation for copper includes these OTHER metals too..
In a way, Choice is out of context


lets see the CORRECT choice


B) The production of copper from other metals in industrial quantities would be prohibitively expensive in energy and materials.
this choice tells us that although copper can be made from other metals, this process is PROHIBITIVELY expensive.
This means we will have to look upon the DEPOSITS only. So there is a requirement to keep a track of these..

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Re: As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial [#permalink]

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New post 02 Apr 2016, 07:46
chetan2u wrote:
MeghaP wrote:
carcass wrote:
Look at the conclusion

Copper can be made from other materials.

Now you need to find a reasoning that helps you to say: that's not true. The only way to weaken the argument is choice B. To make copper from other material is an expensive process.

E is wrong because talks about the estimation of the amount of copper and how it is become sophisticated. But E does not help to weaken out conclusion. E is far apart from out primary scope

Hope this helps

regards



I feel that the conclusion is - Therefore, the quantity of a natural resource such as copper cannot be calculated even in principle
Premise would be - 1) because copper can be made from other metals, and
2) The transmutation of one chemical element into another is a modern reality, through the methods of nuclear physics.

Therefore, E) Methods for estimating the amount of copper available in currently known deposits have become very sophisticated and have proved some accurate - which weakens the conclusion that copper cannot be counted.

My answer is E)

Not sure how to arrive at the correct solution. Please suggest.


Hi,

the conclusion is :-


Therefore, the quantity of a natural resource such as copper cannot be calculated even in principle, because copper can be made from other metals.

and the argument is:-


we do not require to know the copper deposits as copper can be made from other metal and therefore the deposits are not the only source..

lets see what E does


E) Methods for estimating the amount of copper available in currently known deposits have become very sophisticated and have proved some accurate ..
the argument never Qs the methods of estimating the deposits. The argument maintains that we donot require to CALCULATE it in first place as copper can be produced from other metals so the actual calculation for copper includes these OTHER metals too..
In a way, Choice is out of context


lets see the CORRECT choice


B) The production of copper from other metals in industrial quantities would be prohibitively expensive in energy and materials.
this choice tells us that although copper can be made from other metals, this process is PROHIBITIVELY expensive.
This means we will have to look upon the DEPOSITS only. So there is a requirement to keep a track of these..


This is excellent explanation!! Thank you so much :)

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Re: As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jul 2016, 02:46
What I don't understand is why isn't anyone talking about option D. It states that it would be impractical to mine any more metal than is present on the face of the earth (figuratively speaking) i.e. there is a cap on how much metal we can mine (Q says only metals can be converted into copper).
Implicit to this statement is that the maximum total amount of copper present for mankind to use is equal to total copper deposits (+ that in use) + total metal (save copper) deposits (+that in use) on Earth.

Mind u, the stimulus' last line has an implicit understanding that calculating the total amount of copper isn't the challenge its calculating the total amount of metal that is. Option D makes it more likely to calculate the total amount of metal by putting a cap on it.

Option B and E don't seem right since B talks about cost of converitng metal to copper. The option should have been taking about the possibility of such conversion and not the feasibility for starters. E, on the other hand is completely irrelevant since it talks about technlogy for calculating amoutn of copper and not total amount of all the metals present.

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As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jul 2016, 04:17
rushapkhazanchi wrote:
What I don't understand is why isn't anyone talking about option D. It states that it would be impractical to mine any more metal than is present on the face of the earth (figuratively speaking) i.e. there is a cap on how much metal we can mine (Q says only metals can be converted into copper).
Implicit to this statement is that the maximum total amount of copper present for mankind to use is equal to total copper deposits (+ that in use) + total metal (save copper) deposits (+that in use) on Earth.

Mind u, the stimulus' last line has an implicit understanding that calculating the total amount of copper isn't the challenge its calculating the total amount of metal that is. Option D makes it more likely to calculate the total amount of metal by putting a cap on it.

Option B and E don't seem right since B talks about cost of converitng metal to copper. The option should have been taking about the possibility of such conversion and not the feasibility for starters. E, on the other hand is completely irrelevant since it talks about technlogy for calculating amoutn of copper and not total amount of all the metals present.


Hi

If you could look closely in choice B, you have the word "Impractical" - This doesnot mean that metals are not available. all this means is that you don`t have to go for "mining". There could be some sophisticated mechanisms for metal extraction.

Hope you got the point.
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As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jul 2016, 11:04
raghavs wrote:
As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial use should not be thought of as limited by the quantity of copper deposits, known or unknown. The transmutation of one chemical element into another is a modern reality, through the methods of nuclear physics. Therefore, the quantity of a natural resource such as copper cannot be calculated even in principle, because copper can be made from other metals.

Which of the following, if true, is the strongest argument against the argument above?

A) Although it is possible that additional deposits of copper will be found, geological considerations strongly indicate that they will not amount to more than fifty-year supply.
B) The production of copper from other metals in industrial quantities would be prohibitively expensive in energy and materials.
C) Synthetic materials have been discovered that can serve as practical substitutes for copper in most of its uses.
D) It will be impractical, in the foreseeable future, to mine any deposits of metal that may exist on the moon or on other planets.
E) Methods for estimating the amount of copper available in currently known deposits have become very sophisticated and have proved some accurate



IMO B is the correct answer though I went for E.

Conclusion says "the quantity of a natural resource such as copper cannot be calculated even in principle, because copper can be made from other metals.

It implies that copper is one material and there are many other materials from which it can be extracted and it may be an endless list. So, if that is the case, it would be almost impossible to calculate the actual quantity of copper as to extract copper from all other materials would be prohibitively expensive.

As for option E, word "proved some accurate" is the problem as it may imply that methods used for estimating are good but only some of them are accurate. Because of this we can estimate some copper quantity accurately but not all.
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Re: As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2017, 23:59
mvictor wrote:
I do not agree with the above comment.
the conclusion is : Quantity of cooper cannot be estimated.

B doesn't say that it cannot be made
if something is expensive, that does not mean it cannot be still made, while E clearly says that the Q can be estimated.


E is obviously incorrect. The conclusion is about "coppers cannot be calculated...", or the source of the copper. E only talks about copper in known deposits, not unknown. E tells that a method to estimate is accuracy, this has nothing to do with the conclusion.

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Re: As a practical matter, the copper available for industrial   [#permalink] 21 Aug 2017, 23:59
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