GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 24 May 2019, 12:40

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

"except" or "but except"

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 05 May 2016
Posts: 4
"except" or "but except"  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Aug 2016, 11:21
I wonder we should use "except" or "but except".

For example, in OG16

Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

(A) excepting for
(B) except in
(C) but except in
(D) but excepting for
(E) with the exception of

The answer is C

However, in Gmatclub free test

The university library offers most of the resources Ronald will need; except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he will have to request from a neighboring university.
(A)need; except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
(B)need, except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
(C)need, accept for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
(D)need, with the exception of certain Spanish translations of books which he
(E)need, but there are few books in Spanish which he

Answer is B >> why the answer of this one is not A ?

Thank you in advance!
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Jun 2016
Posts: 105
Location: United States
Concentration: Finance, Technology
Re: "except" or "but except"  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Aug 2016, 16:21
The second statement's correct answer is B because A is a sentence fragment with a semicolon. The second part of the sentence can not stand by itself.
INSEAD Thread Master
User avatar
D
Status: MBA Admissions Consultant
Affiliations: MBA Prep Coach
Joined: 24 Mar 2015
Posts: 2018
Farrell D Hehn: MBA
Re: "except" or "but except"  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Aug 2016, 20:21
These are two very different questions but for the first one we need to have "but" to establish contrast.

The intent is to demonstrate a paradox, it's a British colony however aside from X and Y, they don't speak English.

Eccepting is not even a word so that's how I would narrow that down.

The reason is incorrect is because of the semicolon. The semicolon is only appropriate when a period would also work. That's not the case here, it would not be a complete sentence if you put a period in place of this semicolon with A.

Farrell Dyan Hehn, MBA
Admissions Consultant & Verbal Strategist MBAPrepCoach.com
_________________
Farrell Dyan
http://MBAPrepCoach.com
"You don't often come across people so perceptive and empathetic." - EM, NYC
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 24 Oct 2013
Posts: 132
Location: India
Concentration: General Management, Strategy
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Re: "except" or "but except"  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Aug 2016, 06:05
2) To use semi-colon, two statements should be independent and must be related to each other.
In the question above, second statement is not independent sentence. so semi-colon can not be used and hence Option B is correct.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 08 Sep 2016
Posts: 6
Re: "except" or "but except"  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Jul 2017, 21:14
jaja10120 wrote:
I wonder we should use "except" or "but except".

For example, in OG16

Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

(A) excepting for
(B) except in
(C) but except in
(D) but excepting for
(E) with the exception of

The answer is C

However, in Gmatclub free test

The university library offers most of the resources Ronald will need; except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he will have to request from a neighboring university.
(A)need; except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
(B)need, except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
(C)need, accept for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
(D)need, with the exception of certain Spanish translations of books which he
(E)need, but there are few books in Spanish which he

Answer is B >> why the answer of this one is not A ?

Thank you in advance!

Can be "but except in the domains of administration and teaching" considered an independent clause? I'm confused because there is no subject here.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: "except" or "but except"   [#permalink] 19 Jul 2017, 21:14
Display posts from previous: Sort by

"except" or "but except"

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.