It is currently 19 Apr 2018, 12:43

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

In a new housing development, trees are to be planted along the sidewa

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Expert Post
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 44566
In a new housing development, trees are to be planted along the sidewa [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Sep 2015, 22:55
Expert's post
3
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  55% (hard)

Question Stats:

56% (01:10) correct 44% (01:04) wrong based on 171 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

In a new housing development, trees are to be planted along the sidewalk of a certain street. Each tree takes up one square foot of sidewalk space, and there are to be 14 feet between each tree. How many trees can be planted if the road is 166 feet long?

(A) 8
(B) 9
(C) 10
(D) 11
(E) 12


Kudos for a correct solution.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

_________________

New to the Math Forum?
Please read this: Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | All You Need for Quant | PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

Resources:
GMAT Math Book | Triangles | Polygons | Coordinate Geometry | Factorials | Circles | Number Theory | Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets | PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders | GMAT Prep Software Analysis | SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) | Tricky questions from previous years.

Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
Extra-hard Quant Tests with Brilliant Analytics

1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 29 Jul 2015
Posts: 159
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: In a new housing development, trees are to be planted along the sidewa [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Sep 2015, 08:11
1
This post received
KUDOS
Bunuel wrote:
In a new housing development, trees are to be planted along the sidewalk of a certain street. Each tree takes up one square foot of sidewalk space, and there are to be 14 feet between each tree. How many trees can be planted if the road is 166 feet long?

(A) 8
(B) 9
(C) 10
(D) 11
(E) 12


Kudos for a correct solution.


Let T be the number of trees. Then the length required for trees on the sidewalk will be 1*T= T
To maximize the number of trees, the number of 14 feet spaces between trees should be 1 less than total number of trees.
For example, If there are 3 trees, then there should be 2 spaces between them.
So the number of 14 feet spaces will be T-1. Then, the length of sidewalk required for 14 feet spaces will be 14*(T-1)
It is given that total lenght of sidewalk is 166 feet.

or 14(T-1)+T = 166
or 14T-14+T = 166
or 15T = 180
or T=12

Answer:- E
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 23 Aug 2012
Posts: 73
Concentration: Technology
GMAT 1: 710 Q47 V40
Re: In a new housing development, trees are to be planted along the sidewa [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Sep 2015, 09:40
I believe the answer is D. See below for explanation


Because one tree takes up 1 square foot we can derive it takes 1 feet in length.

If the trees need to be separated by 14 feet then we can have one tree + 14 feet equals 15 feet

If we divide 166 feet by 15 feet we get 11.06

Then the max number of trees possible is 11.


Answer D
2 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 29 Jul 2015
Posts: 159
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: In a new housing development, trees are to be planted along the sidewa [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Sep 2015, 10:04
2
This post received
KUDOS
Jonas84 wrote:
I believe the answer is D. See below for explanation


Because one tree takes up 1 square foot we can derive it takes 1 feet in length.

If the trees need to be separated by 14 feet then we can have one tree + 14 feet equals 15 feet

If we divide 166 feet by 15 feet we get 11.06

Then the max number of trees possible is 11.


Answer D


If you divide 166 by 15, you will have a remainder of 1.
So there is a space for 1 more tree since the length of each tree is 1 feet.
So total 12 trees.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 23 Aug 2012
Posts: 73
Concentration: Technology
GMAT 1: 710 Q47 V40
Re: In a new housing development, trees are to be planted along the sidewa [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Sep 2015, 10:15
I believe you are right Kunal555. My bad. Thanks for the correction. Kudos to you.
Expert Post
2 KUDOS received
EMPOWERgmat Instructor
User avatar
D
Status: GMAT Assassin/Co-Founder
Affiliations: EMPOWERgmat
Joined: 19 Dec 2014
Posts: 11489
Location: United States (CA)
GMAT 1: 800 Q51 V49
GRE 1: 340 Q170 V170
Re: In a new housing development, trees are to be planted along the sidewa [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Sep 2015, 11:30
2
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
Hi All,

This is an example of a 'fence-post' problem, meaning that you have to account for the first 'post' (in this case, a tree), work down the line and account for the LAST 'post' (and there will ALWAYS be a last post, right at the very end).

We're told that a tree is 1 square-foot of space and that there is 14 feet of empty space between a tree and the next tree in line. Thus, each "tree-space" pair is 15 feet...

As we travel down the 166 foot row, we will have 166/15 = 11 remainder 1 "pairs." So there are the 11 trees that are part of each '15-foot pair' AND there's 1 foot of leftover space at the end - which is exactly enough room for 1 MORE TREE.

11+1 = 12

Final Answer:
[Reveal] Spoiler:
E


GMAT assassins aren't born, they're made,
Rich
_________________

760+: Learn What GMAT Assassins Do to Score at the Highest Levels
Contact Rich at: Rich.C@empowergmat.com

Rich Cohen

Co-Founder & GMAT Assassin

Special Offer: Save $75 + GMAT Club Tests Free
  Official GMAT Exam Packs + 70 Pt. Improvement Guarantee
www.empowergmat.com/

***********************Select EMPOWERgmat Courses now include ALL 6 Official GMAC CATs!***********************

Expert Post
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 44566
Re: In a new housing development, trees are to be planted along the sidewa [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Sep 2015, 11:47
Bunuel wrote:
In a new housing development, trees are to be planted along the sidewalk of a certain street. Each tree takes up one square foot of sidewalk space, and there are to be 14 feet between each tree. How many trees can be planted if the road is 166 feet long?

(A) 8
(B) 9
(C) 10
(D) 11
(E) 12


Kudos for a correct solution.


Step 1: Analyze the Question

Though this is not a Geometry question, a quick sketch of the situation will help illustrate how to solve it.

Image

So we know that the unit of one tree and one space is 1 * 1 + 14 feet = 15 feet.

Step 2: State the Task

To find how many trees can be planted, determine the feet required for a tree and the space between trees. Divide the total length of the street by the unit of one tree and the space between trees.

Step 3: Approach Strategically

Each tree takes up 1 foot, and each space takes up 14 feet. Together they take up 15 feet. Now find how many times 15 goes into the total number of feet on one side of the street:

166/15= 11, with a remainder of 1 foot.

We can plant one last tree in the remaining foot, bringing the total number of trees to 12. This means along the street, we can plant 12 trees with 11 spaces between them, as long as we start and end with a tree. (E) is correct.

Step 4: Confirm Your Answer

Make sure your answer makes sense in the context of the question. Did you take into account the remainder of the division? Will an entire tree fit in the remaining space? You can use these questions to confirm your work.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
Attachment:
Kaplan2.png
Kaplan2.png [ 2.03 KiB | Viewed 1493 times ]

_________________

New to the Math Forum?
Please read this: Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | All You Need for Quant | PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

Resources:
GMAT Math Book | Triangles | Polygons | Coordinate Geometry | Factorials | Circles | Number Theory | Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets | PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders | GMAT Prep Software Analysis | SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) | Tricky questions from previous years.

Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
Extra-hard Quant Tests with Brilliant Analytics

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 02 Apr 2014
Posts: 467
Re: In a new housing development, trees are to be planted along the sidewa [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Mar 2018, 22:21
Hi Bunuel,

Is n't it "tree occupies one square foot of side walk" wrong? square foot refers to area. I think it should be "tree occupies one foot of side walk". Please correct me, if i am wrong.

Thanks
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 19 Aug 2016
Posts: 71
Re: In a new housing development, trees are to be planted along the sidewa [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Apr 2018, 06:36
Bunuel wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
In a new housing development, trees are to be planted along the sidewalk of a certain street. Each tree takes up one square foot of sidewalk space, and there are to be 14 feet between each tree. How many trees can be planted if the road is 166 feet long?

(A) 8
(B) 9
(C) 10
(D) 11
(E) 12


Kudos for a correct solution.


Step 1: Analyze the Question

Though this is not a Geometry question, a quick sketch of the situation will help illustrate how to solve it.

Image

So we know that the unit of one tree and one space is 1 * 1 + 14 feet = 15 feet.

Step 2: State the Task

To find how many trees can be planted, determine the feet required for a tree and the space between trees. Divide the total length of the street by the unit of one tree and the space between trees.

Step 3: Approach Strategically

Each tree takes up 1 foot, and each space takes up 14 feet. Together they take up 15 feet. Now find how many times 15 goes into the total number of feet on one side of the street:

166/15= 11, with a remainder of 1 foot.

We can plant one last tree in the remaining foot, bringing the total number of trees to 12. This means along the street, we can plant 12 trees with 11 spaces between them, as long as we start and end with a tree. (E) is correct.

Step 4: Confirm Your Answer

Make sure your answer makes sense in the context of the question. Did you take into account the remainder of the division? Will an entire tree fit in the remaining space? You can use these questions to confirm your work.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
Attachment:
Kaplan2.png


Hi Bunuel,

Just wanted to check if my approach was right..

As there is a gap of 14 feet required between two trees, i Could also divide 166/14 and get a remainder of 12

HENCE, i get place to plant 12 trees as each tree is one square foot in measurement

pls guide thanks
Re: In a new housing development, trees are to be planted along the sidewa   [#permalink] 01 Apr 2018, 06:36
Display posts from previous: Sort by

In a new housing development, trees are to be planted along the sidewa

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.