GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 16 Dec 2018, 03:38

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in December
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
2526272829301
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
303112345
Open Detailed Calendar
  • FREE Quant Workshop by e-GMAT!

     December 16, 2018

     December 16, 2018

     07:00 AM PST

     09:00 AM PST

    Get personalized insights on how to achieve your Target Quant Score.
  • Free GMAT Prep Hour

     December 16, 2018

     December 16, 2018

     03:00 PM EST

     04:00 PM EST

    Strategies and techniques for approaching featured GMAT topics

In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 20 Apr 2004
Posts: 85
Location: VA
In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 21 Oct 2018, 23:53
10
1
58
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  15% (low)

Question Stats:

70% (00:30) correct 30% (00:45) wrong based on 2280 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut prices; their wines have been priced to sell, and they are.

(A) have been priced to sell, and they are
(B) are priced to sell, and they have
(C) are priced to sell, and they do
(D) are being priced to sell, and have
(E) had been priced to sell, and they have


The Official Guide for GMAT Review, 2015

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 91
Page: 688

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 123: Sentence Correction


Subscribe to GMAT Question of the Day: E-mail | RSS
For All QOTD Questions Click Here


Attachment:
01.jpg
01.jpg [ 184.94 KiB | Viewed 1927 times ]

Originally posted by shygo on 04 Sep 2004, 11:27.
Last edited by Bunuel on 21 Oct 2018, 23:53, edited 3 times in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
Most Helpful Expert Reply
e-GMAT Representative
User avatar
G
Joined: 02 Nov 2011
Posts: 2773
Re: In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jan 2013, 15:43
20
10
KevinBrink wrote:
I agree with AdeelSilat, how on earth can wines sell themselves. So A can be the only correct answer. I know this is not OA however this questions is full of ****!


Hi KevinBrink,

In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut prices; their wines have been priced to sell, and they are.

This is an official question – OG13#91 – created by the creators of the GMAT. The quality of their questions is unparalleled. I guess, you are not able to understand the meaning of this problem, and that is why it is giving you a tough time. So let’s get started with meaning analysis.

Meaning Analysis:

Italian wine sellers have cut prices of their wines because they want to reduce their stock. They have priced their wine such so that they sell, and the wines actually sell because of this reduced price.

Error Analysis:

Now let’s look at the errors in the original sentence:
The first past of the underlined portion says the wines have been priced to sell. The second part says “they are”. So here we have ellipsis in play. Now, we can only make those words understood that have already appeared in the sentence in the same for. However, after “are” the verbs that can be used are “sold” or “selling”. However, none of these verb forms appear in the sentence anywhere. Hence, “are” is the incorrect helping verb.
Now, there can be a confusion regarding the usage of “sell”. “sell” means to “sell” something. When someone does the action of selling. There is another meaning of “sell” - to have a specific price; be offered for sale at the price indicated. For example: Leather boots sell for just $30.
This is how “sell” has been used in the second part of the underlined portion.

PoE:

(A) have been priced to sell, and they are: Incorrect for the reason stated above.

(B) are priced to sell, and they have: Incorrect. “have” should be followed by “sold” but this word is not present anywhere in the sentence.

(C) are priced to sell, and they do: Correct. Helping verb “do” stands for “sell”, the word that already exists in the sentence.

(D) are being priced to sell, and have: Incorrect. Same error as choice B.

(E) had been priced to sell, and they have: Incorrect.
i. Use of past perfect tense “had been priced” is incorrect because there is no other event in past tense.
ii. Same error as in choice B.

Hope this helps. :)
Thanks.
Shraddha
_________________












| '4 out of Top 5' Instructors on gmatclub | 70 point improvement guarantee | www.e-gmat.com

GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2151
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Oct 2017, 11:22
12
2
4
Heh. I kind of hate this question, and that’s exactly why we chose it for a QOTD. Yeah, it’s a verb tense question, but as with most GMAT SC verb tense questions, it’s mostly a question of thinking somewhat deeply about meaning. If you’re using different verb tenses, then the actions must logically happen at different times. (And we’ll have a lot more to say about GMAT verb tenses in an upcoming YouTube webinar.)

OK, so let’s start by figuring out WTF this sentence is trying to say. Before the semicolon, we have an action in present perfect tense (“vintners have cut prices”). The use of this tense suggests that the action began in the past, and continues into the present – or at least that the consequences continue in the present.

So whatever happens in the underlined portion, it has to be consistent – somehow – with the timeline that vintners started cutting prices sometime in the past, and then reaped the benefits later.

Quote:
(A) have been priced to sell, and they are

I’m not sure that the verb tenses are 100% wrong here, but they aren’t great. “Vintners have cut prices” (in the past, continuing into the present), the wines “have been priced to sell” (also in the past, continuing into the present), but then we have “they are.” Why is it that the “they are” is suddenly in the present, but the pricing stuff started in the past? I’m not sure that it’s wrong, but I don’t think it’s ideal.

The bigger issue: “they are” is the end of the sentence. “They are”… WHAT, exactly? “They are”… delicious? “They are”… cheap? “They are”… getting me drunk after I drink two bottles for breakfast?

(Oops, did I say that last part out loud? I don’t drink wine for breakfast… anymore. But there were some interesting times in Argentina…)

Anyway, you have to make a big, fat, weird leap to assume that the word “selling” is implied at the end of the sentence. There’s no grammatical reason why we would be able to make that assumption. And so we don’t actually know what the sentence is trying to say if the sentence just ends with “they are.”

So (A) is out, even if you’re able to give the verb tenses the benefit of the doubt.

Quote:
(B) are priced to sell, and they have

We have a very similar problem in (B) as in (A): “they have”… what, exactly? “They have”… been fermented from leftover potato pancakes instead of grapes? “They have”… caused Johnny Depp to destroy another hotel room in a drunken haze? “They have”… made Mike tipsy and happy after a long day of surfing?

We can’t just assume that the word “sold” would magically appear after the “have.” Again, there’s no grammatical reason why we can just carry another form of the verb “to sell” to the end of the sentence.

(B) is gone, too.

Quote:
(C) are priced to sell, and they do

OK, this is a weird aspect of the English language: various forms of the verb “to do” functions sort of like a pronoun, except that it can refer back to a verb instead of a noun. Consider the following examples:

  • Mike always wanted to surf in Chile, and last year, he did. → “did” refers back to the verb “to surf”
  • Charlie wanted to eat nine pretzels in one day, and on his last trip to Munich, he did. → “did” refers back to the verb phrase “to eat nine pretzels in one day”, and that sounds awesome

So in (C), the meaning actually makes sense: if “do” refers back to the verb “to sell”, we’re OK. “... the wines are priced to sell, and they [sell].” No problem.

The verb tenses also work pretty well here: vintners “have cut prices” (starting in the past, continuing into the present), and THEN we see the consequences in the present (“the wines are priced to sell, and they [sell]”).

We probably can’t do much better than (C).

Quote:
(D) are being priced to sell, and have

(D) has the same general issue as in (A) and (B): “they have”… what, exactly? Plus, the verb tenses aren’t great here. Why would we use the present progressive “are being priced” – which emphasizes that an action is happening right now – only to switch back to “have”… which is presumably present perfect tense, if it were followed by a participle (i.e., “have sold”).

In other words, even if we assume that the word “have” magically implies the entire phrase “have sold”, the timeline would still be illogical. So (D) is out.

Quote:
(E) had been priced to sell, and they have

(E) has the same “they have… what?” issue as (D), but now the verb tenses are even worse. “Had been priced to sell” suggests that they had been priced to sell in the distant past, before some other past action. So, um, the wines “had been priced to sell” before “vintners have cut prices”, I guess? I’m not sure that you could use the past perfect “had been” before the present perfect “have cut” – but either way, the timeline is completely illogical.

(E) can be eliminated, and we’re left with (C). Tough question, no?
_________________

GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

Most Helpful Community Reply
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 18 Jul 2009
Posts: 42
Re: In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Nov 2009, 10:49
33
13
(A) have been priced to sell, and they are selling

the omitted word is selling

(B) are priced to sell, and they have sold
Wrong tense the omitted word is Sold


(C) are priced to sell, and they do sell

best answer, do is correctly used in place of the full verb do sell; in this verb, do is a conjugated
form and sell is in the infinitive form


(D) are being priced to sell, and have sold

Wrong tense the omitted word is Sold

(E) had been priced to sell, and they have sold

Wrong tense the omitted word is Sold
General Discussion
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 21 Aug 2004
Posts: 134
Re: In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Sep 2004, 23:17
19
9
In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut prices; their wines have been priced to sell. and they are.

(A) have been priced to sell, and they are
(B) are priced to sell, and they have
(C) are priced to sell, and they do
(D) are being priced to sell, and have
(E) had been priced to sell, and they have

this question is an ellipsis question and therefore verbs must match
(A) have been priced to sell, and they are selling

(B) are priced to sell, and they have sold(

C) are priced to sell, and they do sell
(
D) are being priced to sell, and have sold

(E) had been priced to sell, and they have sold

Only C makes the good elipsis.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 12 Aug 2009
Posts: 79
Reviews Badge
Re: In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Sep 2009, 18:10
1
1
given the choice needs something || to sell

(A) have been priced to sell, and they are -- Selling not ||
(B) are priced to sell, and they have - will have sold, not ||
(C) are priced to sell, and they do - sell, and || -> correct choice
(D) are being priced to sell, and have - sold same as B, no subject
(E) had been priced to sell, and they have - sold same as B

So C.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 18 Jul 2009
Posts: 42
Re: In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Nov 2009, 11:12
3
If you rewrite using proper noun then it will be

Italian vintners wines are priced to sell, and Italian vintners do sell
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Status: Current MBA Student
Joined: 19 Nov 2009
Posts: 100
Concentration: Finance, General Management
GMAT 1: 720 Q49 V40
Re: In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Jan 2011, 17:30
2
4
87. In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners
have cut prices; their wines have been priced to sell,
and they are
.

(A) have been priced to sell, and they are
(B) are priced to sell, and they have
(C) are priced to sell, and they do
(D) are being priced to sell, and have
(E) had been priced to sell, and they have

In the OG explanation "the second verb does not need to repeat the word sell because it is understood from the previous verb phrase priced to sell..."

I seem to constantly miss these problems types where key words do not need to be repeated. Any suggestions of improving on these question types?
Knewton GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 55
Location: NY, NY
Schools: BA New School, PhD Candidate CUNY
Re: In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Jan 2011, 14:59
3
1
In general, words being left out or ellipsed is one of the most difficult tricks that English grammar plays, and certainly one of the weirdest that shows up in SC. A couple of general tips:

1) Think as often as you can of the rules of parallel structure. Many different kinds of words can "distribute" to all parts of parallel constructions. The most common are auxiliary (helping) verbs, but other words can also be ellipsed comfortably. For instance:

"My sisters, brothers, and cousins all are coming over." (the adjective "my" is distributed)
"I am, was, and always will be, living in the shadow of my father." (the "living" completes all three verbs -- it's like it's distributed backwards)

2) Think of the word "do" as a "pro-verb." Much as pronouns stand in for nouns, "do" often stands in for a present-tense verb. This is especially common in comparisons:

"As do crickets in the countryside, cars fill up the cityscape with constant background noise." Here, the entire second phrase, but mostly the verb "fill up," is contained within the simple word "do." It may seem weird, but it's very common and totally legitimate.

Please keep in mind that there's no such thing as a "pro-verb" -- it's just something I made up to simplify the explanation of sentences like these. Please don't tell the folks at the Modern Language Association or I'll be in big trouble!
_________________

--
Adam
GMAT Instructor
Knewton, Inc.


View Knewton's latest discount for GMAT Club members.
Sign up with Knewton and get all GMAT Club tests for free

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 31 Aug 2011
Posts: 164
Re: In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 Oct 2012, 22:17
6
1
A: wines...priced to SELL, and they are [SELLING].
Selling and sell are different forms.
Eliminate A.

B, D, and E: wines...priced to SELL, and they have [SOLD].
Sold and sell are different forms.
Eliminate B, D and E.

The correct answer is C:
wines priced to SELL, and they do [SELL].
Here, do is standing in for sell.
Both verbs are in the same form.
_________________

If you found my contribution helpful, please click the +1 Kudos button on the left, I kinda need some =)

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 02 Nov 2012
Posts: 31
Re: In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jan 2013, 10:15
I agree with AdeelSilat, how on earth can wines sell themselves. So A can be the only correct answer. I know this is not OA however this questions is full of ****!
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 14 Oct 2012
Posts: 14
Re: In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jan 2013, 23:17
1
sprtng wrote:
by POE, got C, but dont know how this is correct...i still think it should be past tense...

(A) have been priced to sell, and they are -have been/are tense mismatch
(B) are priced to sell, and they have -they have what?
(C) are priced to sell, and they do -tense wise are ok, but i dont know why this could be right
(D) are being priced to sell, and have -and who have what? are being is also awkward
(E) had been priced to sell, and they have -had been? tense incorrect


The word " sell" is not in the last part because of ellipsis (where certain words can be omitted without breaking parallelism). However, the omitted word(s) must already appear in the sentence and must make sense when substituted back in (sub in and check).

Regarding what you mentioned about tense mismatch, parallelism can be done in a variety of ways, so it doesn't always hold that the tenses must be parallel (but they must be logical)

Just looking at parallelism:
(A) have been priced to sell, and they are (priced to sell -> repeating info in first bit so redundant)
(B) are priced to sell, and they have (priced to sell -> nonsense when slotted back in)
(C) are priced to sell, and they do (sell- makes sense)
(D) are being priced to sell, and have (priced to sell -> again nonsensical)
(E) had been priced to sell, and they have (been priced to sell -> ditto)
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 09 Sep 2012
Posts: 18
Schools: LBS '14, IMD '16
Re: In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Feb 2013, 06:02
3
Question from OG, seeking explanation to the OG explanation

Q. In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners
have cut prices; their wines have been priced to sell,
and they are
.

(A) have been priced to sell, and they are
(B) are priced to sell, and they have
(C) are priced to sell, and they do
(D) are being priced to sell, and have
(E) had been priced to sell, and they have

OG says wrt answer D : omitting the subject they requires that the comma be omitted as well.

that means D (if correct) should be:
"are being priced to sell and have sold"

Can someone explain me the omission of comma + that , theory ?
_________________

Your Kudos will motivate me :)

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Status: Making every effort to create original content for you!!
Joined: 23 Dec 2010
Posts: 472
Location: United States
Concentration: Healthcare, Social Entrepreneurship
GMAT 1: 660 Q48 V34
GMAT 2: 750 Q49 V42
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Feb 2013, 08:14
3
1
eski wrote:
Question from OG, seeking explanation to the OG explanation

Q. In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners
have cut prices; their wines have been priced to sell,
and they are
.

(A) have been priced to sell, and they are
(B) are priced to sell, and they have
(C) are priced to sell, and they do
(D) are being priced to sell, and have
(E) had been priced to sell, and they have

OG says wrt answer D : omitting the subject they requires that the comma be omitted as well.

that means D (if correct) should be:
"are being priced to sell and have sold"

Can someone explain me the omission of comma + that , theory ?


Hi eski,

There are two uses of comma before "and"

i) As a serial comma, used in lists with three or more items.

e.g. Our supermarket sells eatables, cosmetics, hardware, and furniture.

ii) To join (or coordinate) two clauses; this usage is mentioned in the OG.

To illustrate lets consider a simple example:

Joan went to the supermarket, and she bought groceries. --> Correct, comma + and is used to join two clauses. As OG mentioned, subject is required after and
if comma is used.

Joan went to the supermarket and bought groceries. --> Correct, comma is omitted so is the subject after "and"

Joan went to the supermarket; she bought groceries. --> Correct, Semicolon correctly connects independent clauses.

Joan went to the supermarket, and bought groceries. --> Incorrect, this sentence has the same problem as in (D)

Joan went to the supermarket, she bought groceries. --> Incorrect, only a comma can not join two independent clauses. Comma or semicolon should be used.

In the question above if (C) would have been worded as "are priced to sell and do" then also this choice would have been correct.

Hope that helps,

Vercules
_________________

Press Kudos if you want to say thanks

Ultimate Reading Comprehension Encyclopedia | Ultimate Sentence Correction Encyclopedia | GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios -- VERBAL | GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios -- IR

Please Read and Follow the 9 Rules of Posting in Verbal Forum

Retired Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4563
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Apr 2013, 00:55
1
"Have been priced to sell, and they do" will still be incorrect. ‘Have been priced’ means, they have been priced from quite some time. ‘Are priced’ means, they are priced at the moment, (after the prices have been slashed). The logic is that if they have been priced to sell from the past, why did they not then sell in the past, necessitating a price slash” It is clear that the wines are selling only now. So the use of present perfect tense ‘have been priced’ changes the intent of the clause.
_________________

you can know a lot about something and not really understand it."-- a quote
No one knows this better than a GMAT student does.
Narendran +9198845 44509

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 07 Sep 2010
Posts: 261
Re: In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Apr 2013, 04:14
daagh wrote:
"Have been priced to sell, and they do" will still be incorrect. ‘Have been priced’ means, they have been priced from quite some time. ‘Are priced’ means, they are priced at the moment, (after the prices have been slashed). The logic is that if they have been priced to sell from the past, why did they not then sell in the past, necessitating a price slash” It is clear that the wines are selling only now. So the use of present perfect tense ‘have been priced’ changes the intent of the clause.


Hi daagh,

Request you to please validate my reasoning on the question posted above.

In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut prices; their wines have been priced to sell.
and they do(sell).

I believe, that their wines have been priced to sell is correct usage of tense, since it shows the time frame of pricing the wines is same as that of cutting the prices. Obviously, Dealers must have cut prices in order to have a new discounted price that will cause the wines to sell. i.e Both actions must happen simultaneously.
However, the problem is with "do sell". Now, the phrase " do sell" shows that the action is happening at this moment. This is incorrect. The action must have started when the action of "pricing" started. i.e Cause -Effect must have started at the same time.

Thanks
H
Retired Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4563
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Apr 2013, 08:46
To answer your query, let ma ask you 1. to give a suitable verb that describes your reasoning. 2. Is that verb is applied in any of the choices here. 3 what verb you will use for a generalization that happened in the past or started in the past, continues today and is likely to do so in the future too. Let me give you some examples

The first example will be “ Messi has played well in the past, plays well now too and will do so in the future. Are we right in saying that Messy plays well;

The second example will be: The Sun rose in the east in the past; it rises in the east everyday and it will rise in the future too in the east. How can we describe such a phenomenon? Which is a better sentence?
The Sun has been rising in the east (or)
The Sun rises in the east
Apart from the nit-picking of the grammar issue here, I do believe that the modern concise writing style will take chocie C as the most appropriate.
Finally, isn't this Sentence Correction rather than Critical Reasoning?
_________________

you can know a lot about something and not really understand it."-- a quote
No one knows this better than a GMAT student does.
Narendran +9198845 44509

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 15 Jul 2016
Posts: 1
Re: In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Aug 2018, 09:05
Hi,

Though it is clear why C is the correct answer, I would like to know if "their" in their wines and "they" could refer to two entirely different nouns.

IMO, their would refer to Italian Vintners while they would refer to wines, & since both the pronouns refer to different nouns, is the structure of the sentence as per GMAT rules (pronoun ambiguity) acceptable?

Thanks GMATNinja GMATNinjaTWO
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2151
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Aug 2018, 18:22
578vishnu wrote:
Hi,

Though it is clear why C is the correct answer, I would like to know if "their" in their wines and "they" could refer to two entirely different nouns.

IMO, their would refer to Italian Vintners while they would refer to wines, & since both the pronouns refer to different nouns, is the structure of the sentence as per GMAT rules (pronoun ambiguity) acceptable?

Thanks GMATNinja GMATNinjaTWO

Public Service Announcement: anytime you're asking whether the construction in an official, correct answer is acceptable, the answer is always "yes." :-)

There are two things you ideally want to notice here. First, four of the five answer choices contain "they." If you can see that (D) has both a verb tense and a logic issue, this option is out, and you know that you're going to be left with "they" in the correct answer. So there's no reason to waste brain cells worrying about "they", because you basically don't have a choice once you eliminate (D).

Secondly, the construction might not be ideal, but it's pretty logical. Often, when we use a pronoun in the subject of a clause, that pronoun will refer back to the subject of the previous clause (see this video for more on this particular pronoun issue). The sentence starts with "Italian vintners have cut prices; their wines are..." "Their wines" is the subject of the second clause, and the subject of the first clause was "Italian vintners". So there's no problem there.

Next, we have: "their wines are priced to sell, and they do." Again, "they" is the subject of a clause, and the subject of the previous clause was "their wines." Makes sense for "they" to refer to those wines. (And it's worth reiterating: if we'd been able to get rid of (D), we wouldn't waste any time with the above analysis.)

I hope that helps!
_________________

GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 06 Sep 2018
Posts: 171
Location: Pakistan
Concentration: Finance, Operations
GPA: 2.87
WE: Engineering (Other)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Dec 2018, 07:56
A) have been priced to sell, and they are
(B) are priced to sell, and they have
(C) are priced to sell, and they do
(D) are being priced to sell, and have
(E) had been priced to sell, and they have
_________________

Hitting Kudos is the best way of appreciation. :)

Eric Thomas, "When you want to succeed as bad as you want to breathe, then you'll be successful."

GMAT Club Bot
Re: In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut &nbs [#permalink] 05 Dec 2018, 07:56
Display posts from previous: Sort by

In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.