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Is UCLA Anderson more regional than its peer schools?

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Is UCLA Anderson more regional than its peer schools? [#permalink]

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New post 24 Mar 2016, 16:49
I noticed that UCLA Anderson places 76% of its graduates in California, with the remainder going to the rest of the west (7%), 6% to the northeast, 3% to the southwest, 3% to the midwest, .7% to the mid-atlantic, and .4% to the south. I was under the impression Fuqua, Darden, Stern, and Ross were its peer schools, but they all seem to place much more broadly across the US. Is this merely self-selection or a proxy for the value of the school and the reach of their brands? Or is it a combination - i.e. self-selection led to lack of brand recognition outside of California? Lay people/business people know Duke everywhere; does UCLA have the same recognition? It seems more akin to Texas after reviewing the employment report.

I am from the south and either want to work on the west coast or in the south and became concerned when I saw that only .4% of UCLA grads take work in the south. UVA Darden, by contrast, placed 20% in the mid-atlantic, 10% in the midwest, 25% in the northeast, 13% in the south, 9% in the southwest, 14% in the west, and 8% internationally.

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Re: Is UCLA Anderson more regional than its peer schools? [#permalink]

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New post 24 Mar 2016, 16:56
I think it's largely due to self-selection. The West Coast is a pretty desirable place to live for a lot of people who are applying to Anderson, so they're doing so with the intention of staying and taking advantage of the connections in LA and the Bay Area. At least anecdotally, I've met some Anderson 2nd years who are headed to NYC with offers, so it's definitely doable, I think you just don't get a lot of people looking to move to the South from LA.

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Re: Is UCLA Anderson more regional than its peer schools? [#permalink]

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New post 24 Mar 2016, 16:59
whitman wrote:
I noticed that UCLA Anderson places 76% of its graduates in California, with the remainder going to the rest of the west (7%), 6% to the northeast, 3% to the southwest, 3% to the midwest, .7% to the mid-atlantic, and .4% to the south. I was under the impression Fuqua, Darden, Stern, and Ross were its peer schools, but they all seem to place much more broadly across the US. Is this merely self-selection or a proxy for the value of the school and the reach of their brands? Or is it a combination - i.e. self-selection led to lack of brand recognition outside of California? Lay people/business people know Duke everywhere; does UCLA have the same recognition? It seems more akin to Texas after reviewing the employment report.

I am from the south and either want to work on the west coast or in the south and became concerned when I saw that only .4% of UCLA grads take work in the south. UVA Darden, by contrast, placed 20% in the mid-atlantic, 10% in the midwest, 25% in the northeast, 13% in the south, 9% in the southwest, 14% in the west, and 8% internationally.


I think people choose UCLA because of it's location and cultural fit. The intention is to work in California, the West Coast, or the Asia Pacific region. In my company (Bay Area) I would hire someone that went to UCLA over pretty much any of the schools out east.

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Re: Is UCLA Anderson more regional than its peer schools? [#permalink]

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New post 24 Mar 2016, 17:01
whitman wrote:
I noticed that UCLA Anderson places 76% of its graduates in California, with the remainder going to the rest of the west (7%), 6% to the northeast, 3% to the southwest, 3% to the midwest, .7% to the mid-atlantic, and .4% to the south. I was under the impression Fuqua, Darden, Stern, and Ross were its peer schools, but they all seem to place much more broadly across the US. Is this merely self-selection or a proxy for the value of the school and the reach of their brands? Or is it a combination - i.e. self-selection led to lack of brand recognition outside of California? Lay people/business people know Duke everywhere; does UCLA have the same recognition? It seems more akin to Texas after reviewing the employment report.

I am from the south and either want to work on the west coast or in the south and became concerned when I saw that only .4% of UCLA grads take work in the south. UVA Darden, by contrast, placed 20% in the mid-atlantic, 10% in the midwest, 25% in the northeast, 13% in the south, 9% in the southwest, 14% in the west, and 8% internationally.


Stanford is even worse! In 2015 it placed only 1% in the Midwest and less than 1% in the South.. It has clearly gone downhill.
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Re: Is UCLA Anderson more regional than its peer schools? [#permalink]

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New post 24 Mar 2016, 17:03
bb wrote:
whitman wrote:
I noticed that UCLA Anderson places 76% of its graduates in California, with the remainder going to the rest of the west (7%), 6% to the northeast, 3% to the southwest, 3% to the midwest, .7% to the mid-atlantic, and .4% to the south. I was under the impression Fuqua, Darden, Stern, and Ross were its peer schools, but they all seem to place much more broadly across the US. Is this merely self-selection or a proxy for the value of the school and the reach of their brands? Or is it a combination - i.e. self-selection led to lack of brand recognition outside of California? Lay people/business people know Duke everywhere; does UCLA have the same recognition? It seems more akin to Texas after reviewing the employment report.

I am from the south and either want to work on the west coast or in the south and became concerned when I saw that only .4% of UCLA grads take work in the south. UVA Darden, by contrast, placed 20% in the mid-atlantic, 10% in the midwest, 25% in the northeast, 13% in the south, 9% in the southwest, 14% in the west, and 8% internationally.


Stanford is even worse! In 2015 it placed only 1% in the Midwest and less than 1% in the South.. It has clearly gone downhill.


I moved out to the Bay Area 3 years ago. Gotta live here to understand why no one wants to leave. :-)

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Re: Is UCLA Anderson more regional than its peer schools? [#permalink]

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I think part of it is that CA is a world's 8th largest economy. That's about the size/level of France and if you take into consideration the lifestyle, I can see why many don't want to move to Boston, Dallas or Chicago. It is an attractive place for many - those who like the relaxed feel of LA or the more professional but still relaxed Bay Area. Being a person who had to move away from CA after 8 years, it was not an easy decision (was not too hard either as I was tired of traffic and prices) but now Seattle is as congested and almost as expensive with crappy weather. I'd rather be in Socal or Bay area, frankly.

So... if by definition that means UCLA is a regional school - that's fine. It does have weaker reach/network in other parts of the country but really strong in LA and CA. In part, that is because there is a bit of stigma on the East Coast about taking any West Coast MBA program seriously (Stanford is the only one that gets a pass). You should be aware of that - it has been brought up to me before. But then Stanford is regional as well - over 50% of folks stay in CA. I do think it is often because people choose to live there rather than not being able to find opportunities elsewhere.

Welcome to the Hotel California :-)
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Re: Is UCLA Anderson more regional than its peer schools? [#permalink]

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New post 24 Mar 2016, 20:10
Self selection is a huge part of it. As a current student, I can tell you that the reason we place less people outside of California is that people purposefully recruit in CA only and/or turn down opportunities in other cities.

If you want to work and build a network in southern CA, there is simply no better place to be. Come to California and you will see why nobody wants to leave!

For those who wish to work on the East Coast it can be done as every top company recruits on campus, but it simply requires a little more networking with your east coast alumni base.

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Re: Is UCLA Anderson more regional than its peer schools? [#permalink]

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New post 24 Mar 2016, 20:41
Agree with everyone here. It's just self-selection. I want to work in the Bay Area, which is why I'm even going to Anderson in the first place. When you think about top schools on the west coast, it comes down to Stanford, Haas and Anderson. There aren't a whole lot of options for people who want to live on the west coast, so they intentionally apply and choose to attend one of the three. Besides, you're going to be working for your family business so if you do return to the south, I presume you won't need the brand or the network or anything to get that job. I wouldn't overthink that part. If you want to be in California, then you need to come to terms with the fact that it won't be as well known as a regional school in the midwest to people from the midwest.

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Re: Is UCLA Anderson more regional than its peer schools? [#permalink]

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New post 24 Mar 2016, 21:51
It's funny that this topic came up because I have been thinking about something similar in regards to Anderson. Is the relatively low percentage into consulting (one of my desired career paths) due to self-selection as well and students are just more drawn to tech, media and entertainment? Maybe JA21 can shed some light on this as a current student. Would really appreciate it. Thanks.

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Re: Is UCLA Anderson more regional than its peer schools? [#permalink]

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New post 24 Mar 2016, 22:25
mba2k14 wrote:
It's funny that this topic came up because I have been thinking about something similar in regards to Anderson. Is the relatively low percentage into consulting (one of my desired career paths) due to self-selection as well and students are just more drawn to tech, media and entertainment? Maybe JA21 can shed some light on this as a current student. Would really appreciate it. Thanks.



The West Coast schools - all of them do not place well into consulting... 15% for UCLA and Stanford. 20% for Haas.
I think not that many MBA-level consulting opportunities. A friend I had in LA who did work for Accenture, was assigned to an account in Mid West and spent 4 days of his life there or traveling there. (Not that Accenture is the consulting heaven but even for those guys, there was not enough local work). Consulting thrives on large inefficient businesses - not many of those in LA. There is Tech in Bay area and start ups - not traditional consulting clients. This is my theory with some backup sprinkled here and there. However, curious what students have to say from the actual recruiting trenches.
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Re: Is UCLA Anderson more regional than its peer schools? [#permalink]

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New post 25 Mar 2016, 10:14
finalhourmba wrote:
bb wrote:
whitman wrote:
I noticed that UCLA Anderson places 76% of its graduates in California, with the remainder going to the rest of the west (7%), 6% to the northeast, 3% to the southwest, 3% to the midwest, .7% to the mid-atlantic, and .4% to the south. I was under the impression Fuqua, Darden, Stern, and Ross were its peer schools, but they all seem to place much more broadly across the US. Is this merely self-selection or a proxy for the value of the school and the reach of their brands? Or is it a combination - i.e. self-selection led to lack of brand recognition outside of California? Lay people/business people know Duke everywhere; does UCLA have the same recognition? It seems more akin to Texas after reviewing the employment report.

I am from the south and either want to work on the west coast or in the south and became concerned when I saw that only .4% of UCLA grads take work in the south. UVA Darden, by contrast, placed 20% in the mid-atlantic, 10% in the midwest, 25% in the northeast, 13% in the south, 9% in the southwest, 14% in the west, and 8% internationally.


Stanford is even worse! In 2015 it placed only 1% in the Midwest and less than 1% in the South.. It has clearly gone downhill.


I moved out to the Bay Area 3 years ago. Gotta live here to understand why no one wants to leave. :-)


Ya I have to agree. If you have lived in SF or west LA then the idea of moving somewhere like Indianapolis or Atlanta by choice would seem pretty unfathomable. No offense to those cities in particular...

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Re: Is UCLA Anderson more regional than its peer schools? [#permalink]

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New post 26 Mar 2016, 23:22
mba2k14 wrote:
It's funny that this topic came up because I have been thinking about something similar in regards to Anderson. Is the relatively low percentage into consulting (one of my desired career paths) due to self-selection as well and students are just more drawn to tech, media and entertainment? Maybe JA21 can shed some light on this as a current student. Would really appreciate it. Thanks.

The consulting recruitment at UCLA is up from 15% to 20%! I think tech is high because of the large number of tech companies here, plus consulting is lower as there are fewer consulting offices in California and even if not, there are a large number of intra company transfers saturating these offices already.

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Re: Is UCLA Anderson more regional than its peer schools? [#permalink]

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New post 31 Mar 2016, 11:52
mba2k14 wrote:
It's funny that this topic came up because I have been thinking about something similar in regards to Anderson. Is the relatively low percentage into consulting (one of my desired career paths) due to self-selection as well and students are just more drawn to tech, media and entertainment? Maybe JA21 can shed some light on this as a current student. Would really appreciate it. Thanks.


Have you made a decision?

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Re: Is UCLA Anderson more regional than its peer schools? [#permalink]

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New post 31 Mar 2016, 23:21
whitman wrote:
mba2k14 wrote:
It's funny that this topic came up because I have been thinking about something similar in regards to Anderson. Is the relatively low percentage into consulting (one of my desired career paths) due to self-selection as well and students are just more drawn to tech, media and entertainment? Maybe JA21 can shed some light on this as a current student. Would really appreciate it. Thanks.


Have you made a decision?


Not yet. Are you all in on Anderson?

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Re: Is UCLA Anderson more regional than its peer schools? [#permalink]

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New post 09 Apr 2016, 19:38
Nope. Still deciding between there and Vandy. Toying with reapplying next year in Round 1, too. I haven't visited Anderson yet, so hopefully it will just feel right and I'll go.

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Re: Is UCLA Anderson more regional than its peer schools?   [#permalink] 09 Apr 2016, 19:38
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