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Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6

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Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6  [#permalink]

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Is xy > 0?

(1) x - y > -2
(2) x - 2y < -6

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Originally posted by Baten80 on 05 Jun 2011, 04:06.
Last edited by Bunuel on 09 Jul 2014, 09:49, edited 2 times in total.
Edited the question.
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Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6  [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2012, 02:09
17
36
Is xy>0?

Note that question basically asks whether \(x\) and \(y\) have the same sign.

(1) x-y > -2 --> we can have an YES answer, if for example \(x\) and \(y\) are both positive (\(x=10\) and \(y=1\)) as well as a NO answer, if for example \(x\) is positive and \(y\) is negative (\(x=10\) and \(y=-10\)). Not sufficient.

(2) x-2y <-6 --> again it' easy to get an YES answer, if for example \(x\) and \(y\) are both positive (\(x=1\) and \(y=10\)) as well as a NO answer, if for example \(x\) is negative and \(y\) is positive (\(x=-1\) and \(y=10\)). Not sufficient.

You can get that the the two statement individually are not sufficient in another way too: we have (1) \(y<x+2\) and (2) \(y>\frac{x}{2}+3\). We are asked whether \(x\) and \(y\) have the same sign or whether the points (x,y) are in the I or III quadrant ONLY. But all (x,y) points below the line \(y=x+2\) (for 1) and all (x, y) points above the line \(y=\frac{x}{2}+3\) cannot lie only in I or III quadrant: points above or below some line (not parallel to axis) lie at least in 3 quadrants.

(1)+(2) Now, remember that we can subtract inequalities with the signs in opposite direction --> subtract (2) from (1): \(x-y-(x-2y)>-2-(-6)\) --> \(y>4\). As \(y>4\) and (from 1) \(x>y-2\) then \(x>2\) (because we can add inequalities when their signs are in the same direction, so: \(y+x>4+(y-2)\) --> \(x>2\)) --> we have that \(y>4\) and \(x>2\): both \(x\) and \(y\) are positive. Sufficient.

Answer: C.
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Re: Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jul 2013, 10:24
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Please find attached graphical solution. I think its easier and simpler to solve such inequality problem using co-ordinate geometry.

I made this graph in a hurry in paint, so please don't mind the poorly drawn lines.

Consider pressing on Kudos if my post helped you in any way!
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Re: Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2011, 04:20
5
3
(1)

x = 1, y = 0

xy = 0 although x-y = 1 > -2

x = -3, y = -2

xy = 6 > 0 and x-y = -1 > -2

Insufficient

(2)

x - 2y < -6

x = 1, y = 4

x - 2y = 1 - 8 = -7 < -6 and xy > 0

x = 0, y = 4

x - 2y = 0 - 8 = -8 < -6 and xy = 0

Insufficient

(1) + (2)

x - y > -2

2y - x > 6

y > 4

Now x has to be such that x > y - 2

So x is positive, because y is 4.1, 5 etc.
and x is > 2.1, 3 etc.


So xy = positive

Answer - C
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Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jul 2013, 22:34
15
3
Image

Is xy > 0?

\(xy>0\) means that x and y must have the same sign, so point (x, y) must be either in the first or the third quadrant (green regions).

(1) x-y > -2 --> \(y<x+2\) --> the area below blue line (\(y=x+2\)). (x, y) may or may not be in green region. Not sufficient.

(2) x-2y < -6 --> \(y>\frac{x}{2}+3\) --> the area above red line (\(y>\frac{x}{2}+3\)). (x, y) may or may not be in green region. Not sufficient.

(1)+(2) Below blue line and above red line, is yellow region, which is entirely in I quadrant (where \(y>4\) and \(x>2\)) --> \(xy>0\). Sufficient.

Answer: C.

Hope it helps.

Attachment:
xy.png
xy.png [ 8.35 KiB | Viewed 70350 times ]

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Re: Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2014, 06:19
Bunuel wrote:

Graphic approach:

Attachment:
xy.png


Is xy > 0?

\(xy>0\) means that x and y must have the same sign, so point (x, y) must be either in the first or the third quadrant (green regions).

(1) x-y > -2 --> \(y<x+2\) --> the area below blue line (\(y=x+2\)). (x, y) may or may not be in green region. Not sufficient.

(2) x-2y < -6 --> \(y>\frac{x}{2}+3\) --> the area above red line (\(y>\frac{x}{2}+3\)). (x, y) may or may not be in green region. Not sufficient.

(1)+(2) Below blue line and above red line, is yellow region, which is entirely in I quadrant (where \(y>4\) and \(x>2\)) --> \(xy>0\). Sufficient.

Answer: C.

Hope it helps.



Hi Bunuel,

I have doubts on graphical method -->

why is line y<x+2 passing through x = -2 ?
the value of x should be greater than -2 (the line may pass through x = -1, 0, 1, 2, ...)
Similarly, why is line y > (x/2) + 3 passing through x = -6
the value of x should be less than -6 (the line may pass through x = -7, -8, -9,...)

With the graphical method, can you illustrate solution of following example ?

Is x + y > 0 ?

1) x - y > 0
2) x^2 - y^2 > 0

Regards,
Akshay
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Re: Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2014, 06:40
AkshayDavid wrote:
Bunuel wrote:

Graphic approach:


Image

Is xy > 0?

\(xy>0\) means that x and y must have the same sign, so point (x, y) must be either in the first or the third quadrant (green regions).

(1) x-y > -2 --> \(y<x+2\) --> the area below blue line (\(y=x+2\)). (x, y) may or may not be in green region. Not sufficient.

(2) x-2y < -6 --> \(y>\frac{x}{2}+3\) --> the area above red line (\(y>\frac{x}{2}+3\)). (x, y) may or may not be in green region. Not sufficient.

(1)+(2) Below blue line and above red line, is yellow region, which is entirely in I quadrant (where \(y>4\) and \(x>2\)) --> \(xy>0\). Sufficient.

Answer: C.

Hope it helps.



Hi Bunuel,

I have doubts on graphical method -->

why is line y<x+2 passing through x = -2 ?
the value of x should be greater than -2 (the line may pass through x = -1, 0, 1, 2, ...)
Similarly, why is line y > (x/2) + 3 passing through x = -6
the value of x should be less than -6 (the line may pass through x = -7, -8, -9,...)

With the graphical method, can you illustrate solution of following example ?

Is x + y > 0 ?

1) x - y > 0
2) x^2 - y^2 > 0

Regards,
Akshay


y < x + 2 is the region which lies BELOW (because of < sign) line y = x + 2.

y > x/2 + 3 is the region which lies ABOVE (because of > sign) line y = x/2 + 3.

Check here for more: graphic-approach-to-problems-with-inequalities-68037.html

Hope it helps.
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Re: Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6  [#permalink]

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New post 13 May 2015, 19:37
Hi,

I approached the 1&2 decision the same way as Bunuel but just had a clarifying question. When we subtract the two inequalities from eachother..how do we know that the sign stays as greater than (i.e. how do we know that it's y>4 instead of y<4). I assumed it was y>4 and got the question correct because i was subtracting a less than equation from a greater than equation but I have a feeling that's not the right logic. Thanks!
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Re: Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6  [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2015, 00:32
7
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healthjunkie wrote:
Hi,

I approached the 1&2 decision the same way as Bunuel but just had a clarifying question. When we subtract the two inequalities from eachother..how do we know that the sign stays as greater than (i.e. how do we know that it's y>4 instead of y<4). I assumed it was y>4 and got the question correct because i was subtracting a less than equation from a greater than equation but I have a feeling that's not the right logic. Thanks!



Hi healthjunkie,

Let me help you out with such operations on inequalities.

Assume two inequalities x + y > 10......(1)
& x - y < 2........(2)

We see here that both the inequalities have opposite signs.

The basic concept of the inequality says to convert the inequalities into same sign before adding or subtracting them.

We can change the sign of the inequality by multiplying -1 on both sides of the inequality. Let's do it on inequality (2)

x - y < 2, multiplying -1 on both sides we get
-x + y > -2.

Since we have inequality (1) & (2) with the same signs we can add them now

x + y -x + y > 10 -2 i.e. y > 4.

Note here that adding inequality (1) to inequality (2) after multiplying inequality (2) by -1 is similar to subtracting inequality (2) from inequality (1). This concept is used when we say that we can subtract two inequalities with opposite signs.

In this question you asked we subtracted inequality in st-II from inequality in st-I which incidentally meant that st-II was multiplied by -1 and then added to st-I. So, the sign of inequality in st-II flipped.

x - 2y < -6, multiplying it with -1 gave the inequality -x + 2y > 6 which was then added to inequality in st-I

Hope its clear :-D

Regards
Harsh
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Re: Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Apr 2016, 04:40
Bunuel wrote:

Is xy>0?

Note that question basically asks whether \(x\) and \(y\) have the same sign.

(1) x-y > -2 --> we can have an YES answer, if for example \(x\) and \(y\) are both positive (\(x=10\) and \(y=1\)) as well as a NO answer, if for example \(x\) is positive and \(y\) is negative (\(x=10\) and \(y=-10\)). Not sufficient.

(2) x-2y <-6 --> again it' easy to get an YES answer, if for example \(x\) and \(y\) are both positive (\(x=1\) and \(y=10\)) as well as a NO answer, if for example \(x\) is negative and \(y\) is positive (\(x=-1\) and \(y=10\)). Not sufficient.

You can get that the the two statement individually are not sufficient in another way too: we have (1) \(y<x+2\) and (2) \(y>\frac{x}{2}+3\). We are asked whether \(x\) and \(y\) have the same sign or whether the points (x,y) are in the I or III quadrant ONLY. But all (x,y) points below the line \(y=x+2\) (for 1) and all (x, y) points above the line \(y=\frac{x}{2}+3\) can not lie only I or III quadrant: points above or below some line (not parallel to axis) lie at least in 3 quadrants.

(1)+(2) Now, remember that we can subtract inequalities with the signs in opposite direction --> subtract (2) from (1): \(x-y-(x-2y)>-2-(-6)\) --> \(y>4\). As \(y>4\) and (from 1) \(x>y-2\) then \(x>2\) (because we can add inequalities when their signs are in the same direction, so: \(y+x>4+(y-2)\) --> \(x>2\)) --> we have that \(y>4\) and \(x>2\): both \(x\) and \(y\) are positive. Sufficient.

Answer: C.


Dear Bunuel,

Please find my attached process.

However, the combined solving of eqns gave me, x<-4 or x>-1, a case in which we cannot comment on sign of x. Can you please help me understand where I have gone wrong?
Attachments

IMG_20160401_163125.jpg
IMG_20160401_163125.jpg [ 2.2 MiB | Viewed 40494 times ]


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Re: Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Apr 2016, 06:30
1
Alok322 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:

Is xy>0?

Note that question basically asks whether \(x\) and \(y\) have the same sign.

(1) x-y > -2 --> we can have an YES answer, if for example \(x\) and \(y\) are both positive (\(x=10\) and \(y=1\)) as well as a NO answer, if for example \(x\) is positive and \(y\) is negative (\(x=10\) and \(y=-10\)). Not sufficient.

(2) x-2y <-6 --> again it' easy to get an YES answer, if for example \(x\) and \(y\) are both positive (\(x=1\) and \(y=10\)) as well as a NO answer, if for example \(x\) is negative and \(y\) is positive (\(x=-1\) and \(y=10\)). Not sufficient.

You can get that the the two statement individually are not sufficient in another way too: we have (1) \(y<x+2\) and (2) \(y>\frac{x}{2}+3\). We are asked whether \(x\) and \(y\) have the same sign or whether the points (x,y) are in the I or III quadrant ONLY. But all (x,y) points below the line \(y=x+2\) (for 1) and all (x, y) points above the line \(y=\frac{x}{2}+3\) can not lie only I or III quadrant: points above or below some line (not parallel to axis) lie at least in 3 quadrants.

(1)+(2) Now, remember that we can subtract inequalities with the signs in opposite direction --> subtract (2) from (1): \(x-y-(x-2y)>-2-(-6)\) --> \(y>4\). As \(y>4\) and (from 1) \(x>y-2\) then \(x>2\) (because we can add inequalities when their signs are in the same direction, so: \(y+x>4+(y-2)\) --> \(x>2\)) --> we have that \(y>4\) and \(x>2\): both \(x\) and \(y\) are positive. Sufficient.

Answer: C.


Dear Bunuel,

Please find my attached process.

However, the combined solving of eqns gave me, x<-4 or x>-1, a case in which we cannot comment on sign of x. Can you please help me understand where I have gone wrong?


Hi,
your Equations are further to be simplified..

you got
2y-6 > x> y-2
we can infer 2y-6>y-2...
or 2y-y>6-2 that is y>4..
if y>4 and x+2>y, x will be >2..
thus both x and y are +ive and our answer is YES for xy>0..

Do not substitute value in 2y-6 > x> y-2 and find the signs of x and y..
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Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6  [#permalink]

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New post 06 May 2016, 02:52
chetan2u Looks like how I came with the solution is wrong. Since statement 1 and 2 are not sufficient I tried to combine the two statements.

1. X- Y>-2 2. X-2Y <-6

FROM 1: X>Y-2-------(WE HAVE A VALUE FOR X) substituting this value in statement 2 yields;

Y-2 -2Y<-6
OR, -Y < -4
OR, Y> 4 (MUTLIPLYING BOTH SIDES WITH A NEGATIVE SIGN.)

SINCE Y> 4, FROM STATEMETN ONE

X-Y>-2 OR, X- 4.1> -2, SOLVING FOR THIS WOULD GIVE X>2.1.

Is my process correct?
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Re: Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6  [#permalink]

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New post 07 May 2016, 07:22
bimalr9 wrote:
chetan2u Looks like how I came with the solution is wrong. Since statement 1 and 2 are not sufficient I tried to combine the two statements.

1. X- Y>-2 2. X-2Y <-6

FROM 1: X>Y-2-------(WE HAVE A VALUE FOR X) substituting this value in statement 2 yields;

Y-2 -2Y<-6
OR, -Y < -4
OR, Y> 4 (MUTLIPLYING BOTH SIDES WITH A NEGATIVE SIGN.)

SINCE Y> 4, FROM STATEMETN ONE

X-Y>-2 OR, X- 4.1> -2, SOLVING FOR THIS WOULD GIVE X>2.1.

Is my process correct?


HI,
In this Q it is ok..
But a lot depends on '>' and '<' signs.. you cannot substitute without knowing these..
1. X- Y>-2 ...... x>y-2
2. X-2Y <-6..... x<2y-6..
so y-2<x<2y-6....
so here clearly y-2<2y-6 .... or y>4...
so form equations then substitute...
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Re: Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Aug 2016, 09:42
I didn't know that you can subtract opposite sign equations and actually I feel that many will still get the sign mixed up as to whether it would be < or >. Instead you can flip one of the equations and then you will end up with one sign and then just add from there. That way, there is less chance for a mistake to occur.
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Re: Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Dec 2017, 07:43
1
Baten80 wrote:
Is xy > 0?

(1) x - y > -2
(2) x - 2y < -6


We need to determine whether the product of x and y is positive. We should recall that the product of two numbers is positive only if both the numbers are positive or if both are negative.

Statement One Alone:

x - y > -2

Statement one tells us that the difference between x and y is -2; it does not tell us anything about the signs of x and y. For instance, if x = 2 and y = 1, we have x - y = 1 > -2, and xy is positive. However, if x = 3 and y = -2, 3 - (-2) = 5 > -2, but xy is negative. Statement one alone is not sufficient. We can eliminate answer choices A and D.

Statement Two Alone:

x - 2y < -6

Again, we have a statement that tells us nothing about the signs of x and y. For instance, if x = 3 and y = 5, then x - 2y = 3 - 2(5) = 3 - 10 = -7 < -6, and xy is positive. However, if x = -1 and y = 5, then x - 2y = -1 - 2(5) = -11 < -6, and xy is negative. Statement two alone is not sufficient. We can eliminate answer choice B.

Statements One and Two Together:

Let’s manipulate the first inequality to read: y < x + 2. Similarly, we can manipulate the second inequality to read: y > (1/2)x + 3.

Thus, we can say the following:

(1/2)x + 3 < y < x + 2

(1/2)x + 3 < x + 2

x + 6 < 2x + 4

2 < x

Thus, x is positive.

We also know the following:

y > (1/2)x + 3

Since x is greater than two, let’s see what we can determine about y, if we substitute 2 for x.

y > (1/2)(2) + 3

y > 4

So y is positive as well. Both statements together are sufficient.

Answer: C
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Re: Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jan 2018, 12:32
Hello Bunuel,

I arrive to y>4.

When you replace it in (1) it makes x>2: OK

But

When you replace it in (2) it makes x - 2(4) < -6 ; so x <2 and so can be negative or positive.

Could you advise when replacing in (1) X>2 (answer =C) and when replacing in (2) we have answer (E) as x<2.

Thanks in advance,
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Re: Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jan 2018, 12:54
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Tpral wrote:
Hello Bunuel,

I arrive to y>4.

When you replace it in (1) it makes x>2: OK

But

When you replace it in (2) it makes x - 2(4) < -6 ; so x <2 and so can be negative or positive.

Could you advise when replacing in (1) X>2 (answer =C) and when replacing in (2) we have answer (E) as x<2.

Thanks in advance,


We got y > 4 not y = 4, so you cannot substitute the way you did. In the solution, x > 2, is derived by adding y > 4 and x > y - 2 (we can add inequalities when their signs are in the same direction): \(y+x>4+(y-2)\) --> \(x>2\).
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Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2018, 13:38
I had some trouble with this one:
After eliminating A, B, and D I took a look at both equations:
x-y>-2
x-2y<-6

then I multiplied equation 1 by 3 on both sides:
3(x-y)>3(-2)
3x-3y>-6

with that I combined both statements around -6
x-2y<-6<3x-3y

then collapsed -6 out of the inequality
x-2y<3x-3y

then simplified:
x-2y<3x-3y
x+y<3x [+3y to each side]
y<2x [-x to each side]

and got E insufficient (equation is true if y=1 and x=2 and if y=-1 and x=2); can someone let me know where my misstep was?
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Re: Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2018, 20:38
ktjorge wrote:
I had some trouble with this one:
After eliminating A, B, and D I took a look at both equations:
x-y>-2
x-2y<-6

then I multiplied equation 1 by 3 on both sides:
3(x-y)>3(-2)
3x-3y>-6

with that I combined both statements around -6
x-2y<-6<3x-3y

then collapsed -6 out of the inequality
x-2y<3x-3y

then simplified:
x-2y<3x-3y
x+y<3x [+3y to each side]
y<2x [-x to each side]

and got E insufficient (equation is true if y=1 and x=2 and if y=-1 and x=2); can someone let me know where my misstep was?


Your manipulations are not wrong but they are not complete and thus do not lead to the correct answer.
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Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

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Re: Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jun 2018, 09:29
Bunuel wrote:


We got y > 4 not y = 4, so you cannot substitute the way you did. In the solution, x > 2, is derived by adding y > 4 and x > y - 2 (we can add inequalities when their signs are in the same direction): \(y+x>4+(y-2)\) --> \(x>2\).


Hi Bunuel ,

Kindly clarify -

"In the Solution of X>2" : Instead of adding Y>4 and X > Y-2 (from equation 1) , can we not add Y>4 and -X> 6-2y ? (from equation 2 : x-2y <-6)

If we do this , we will arrive at X < 2
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Re: Is xy > 0? (1) x - y > -2 (2) x - 2y < -6 &nbs [#permalink] 02 Jun 2018, 09:29

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