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Labeling Zora Neale Hurston "a writer of the Harlem Renaissance"

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Labeling Zora Neale Hurston "a writer of the Harlem Renaissance"  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Nov 2018, 23:37
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New RC from 1988 Official Guide



    Labeling Zora Neale Hurston "a writer of the
    Harlem Renaissance" is a characterization that
    may, at first glance, obscure, rather than clarify, the
    particularities of her career. The Harlem Renais-
(5)
    sance was a spirit more than a movement, and
    because a spirit is ephemeral, generalizations about
    the Harlem Renaissance and its writers are either
    too hard or too easy. They have come easily
    enough to a whole generation of critics, but their
(10)
    pithy summaries seldom reflect the wide divisions
    between Blacks and Whites, the Black intelligentsia
    and Black workers, Black writers and their middle-
    class audience, that marked the era. When one
    studies in depth the phenomenon of what was then
(15)
    called the Negro Renaissance or the New Negro
    Renaissance, and what is now called the Harlem
    Renaissance, one comes away with a bewildering
    complex of notions, statements, affirmations, and
    manifestos. Although there is general agreement
(20)
    that the Harlem Renaissance is bounded by the
    1918 armistice ending the First World War and the
    beginning of the Great Depression in 1930, some
    historians have stretched the boundaries to before
    the war (1914) and after Franklin Delano Roo-
(25)
    sevelt's second term (1941). There has been a wide-
    spread tendency to regard the Harlem Renaissance
    as a monolithic cultural movement, capable of
    reduction to one orthodoxy or another or to a set
    of characteristic principles. This presumption
(30)
    reflects the bias in most American scholarship that
    postulates Black people as a united entity and then
    poses theories ignoring individuation of thought
    and feeling.
    Sometimes, however, an individual career can be
    (35) best assessed in the context of an age, and this is
    largely the case with the writer and anthropologist
    Zora Neale Hurston. She spends exactly two para-
    graphs on the Renaissance in her autobiography,
    and her other writing, public and private, offers
(40)
    a very little discussion of what the Harlem Renais-
    sance meant to her. Yet her part in the Renaissance
    is well-documented in the reminiscences of others,
    with unanimous agreement that she was one of the
    most memorable personages of the period. As
(45)
    Langston Hughes put it in The Big Sea, she "was
    certainly the most amusing" of the Harlem Renais-
    sance artists, "full of side-splitting anecdotes,
    humorous tales, and tragicomic stories." Hughes's
    words should not imply that she was solely an
(50)
    entertainer. Although she was independent and
    scornful of literary movements, she shared in the
    historical and cultural forces that made the Harlem
    Renaissance an identifiable moment in American
    intellectual history
    , a part of a historical process
(55)
    that, as most critics recognize, altered Black life in
    America. She, in turn, responded to and helped to
    shape the aesthetic assumptions of that era.
    Between 1919 and 1930, Black writers were pub-
    lished in greater numbers than in any single decade
(60)
    in American life prior to the 1960's. Hurston's
    awareness of this literary ferment certainly con-
    tributed to her development as a writer.

1. The main purpose of the passage is to

(A) define the Harlem Renaissance as a distinct period in Afro-American culture and Ameri- can culture as a whole
(B) demonstrate that the Harlem Renaissance included more varied points of view than scholars generally assume
(C) dispute the accepted estimation of Zora Neale Hurston's contribution to Afro-American culture
(D) acknowledge the conflicts and contradictions that were a distinct part of the cultural life of the Harlem Renaissance
(E) place Zora Neale Hurston within a historical and intellectual context


2. It can be inferred from the passage that the author would regard which of the following as characteristic of a movement but not of a spirit?

(A) Individual statements of purpose
(B) Conflicts between rivals
(C) The cultivation of notoriety
(D) The development of new ideas
(E) An explicit ideology


3. The author suggests that which of the following is an overlooked yet significant aspect of the Harlem Renaissance?

(A) The similarity of the works produced by Black writers during the Harlem Renaissance
(B) The perceptions of the central figures of the Harlem Renaissance as recorded in autobi- ographies and letters
(C) The interdisciplinary nature of Hurston's work
(D) The nature of the relationship between Black artists and their audiences
(E) The effect of Roosevelt's policies on artists and writers


4. Which of the following facts, mentioned in the passage, supports the author's statement that the Harlem Renaissance was "an identifiable moment in American intellectual history" in the highlighted text?

(A) During this period, scholars who had previously been unaware of Black literary tradition began to assess that tradition.
(B) Widespread social reform took place during this period.
(C) During this period, Black people acted upon common concerns for the first time in the twentieth century.
(D) The number of published works by Black writers increased dramatically during this period.
(E) The armistice ending the First World War began a period of increased prosperity for Americans.


5. According to the passage, Hurston's attitude toward literary movements in general was

(A) bemused
(B) ambivalent
(C) indifferent
(D) disdainful
(E) belligerent


6. The author implies that Hurston's account of her role in the Harlem Renaissance is

(A) embellished
(B) unenlightening
(C) comic
(D) sardonic
(E) sentimental


7. It can be inferred from the passage that accounts of Hurston given by her contemporaries emphasized which of the following?

(A) Her work as an anthropologist
(B) Her independence from political movements
(C) Her humor
(D) Her friendliness
(E) Her contributions to aesthetic theory


8. On which of the following grounds does the author dismiss previous critical work on the Harlem Renaissance?

(A) It is based on a faulty assumption about the homogeneity of Black experience.
(B) It has failed to acknowledge the work of the most talented writers of the Harlem Renaissance.
(C) It has failed to explain the consequences of the Harlem Renaissance for Black life.
(D) It has taken a sociological and historical approach rather than an aesthetic one.
(E) It has concentrated on the personalities of the writers of the Harlem Renaissance rather than on their work.


9. Which of the following statements is best supported by information in the passage?

(A) Black workers were not the primary audience for works produced by Black writers during the Harlem Renaissance.
(B) The number of works produced by Black writers has continued to increase annually since 1919.
(C) Langston Hughes created an unintentionally misleading portrait of Zora Neale Hurston in The Big Sea.
(D) Zora Neale Hurston is better known for her anthropological work than for her literary work.
(E) There was almost no market for works produced by Black writers during the Harlem Renaissance.


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Re: Labeling Zora Neale Hurston "a writer of the Harlem Renaissance"  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Nov 2018, 23:39

+1 kudos to the posts containing answer explanations of all questions



I will add explanations after I see a few responses.
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Re: Labeling Zora Neale Hurston "a writer of the Harlem Renaissance"  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Nov 2018, 20:59
2
1
Q1 : E

A : Out of scope
B : Out of scope
C : No one is disputing anything about her
D : no one is acknowledging any conflicts
E : Correct

Q2 : E

"There has been a widespread tendency to regard the Harlem Renaissance as a monolithic cultural movement, capable of reduction to one orthodoxy or another or to a set of characteristic principles. This presumption reflects the bias in most American scholarship that postulates Black people as a united entity and then poses theories ignoring individuation of thought and feeling."

Q3 : D

"generalizations about the Harlem Renaissance and its writers are either too hard or too easy. They have come easily enough to a whole generation of critics, but their pithy summaries seldom reflect the wide divisions between Blacks and Whites, the Black intelligentsia and Black workers, Black writers and their middle- class audience, that marked the era"

Q4 : D

"Between 1919 and 1930, Black writers were published in greater numbers than in any single decade in American life prior to the 1960's." - 2nd para bottom part

Q5 : D

"Hughes's words should not imply that she was solely an entertainer. Although she was independent and scornful of literary movements, she shared in the historical and cultural forces that made the Harlem Renaissance an identifiable moment in American intellectual history"

Q6: B

"She spends exactly two paragraphs on the Renaissance in her autobiography, and her other writing, public and private, offers a very little discussion of what the Harlem Renaissance meant to her"

Q7: C

"As Langston Hughes put it in The Big Sea, she "was certainly the most amusing" of the Harlem Renaissance artists, "full of side-splitting anecdotes, humorous tales, and tragicomic stories.""

Q8 : A

"generalizations about the Harlem Renaissance and its writers are either too hard or too easy. They have come easily enough to a whole generation of critics, but their pithy summaries seldom reflect the wide divisions between Blacks and Whites, the Black intelligentsia and Black workers, Black writers and their middle- class audience, "

Q9 : A

A : Correct
B : "Black writers has continued to increase annually since 1919" no data to prove this
C : False
D: Out of scope
E : Out of scope
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Re: Labeling Zora Neale Hurston "a writer of the Harlem Renaissance"  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Mar 2019, 17:16
Hi
workout wrote:
9. Which of the following statements is best supported by information in the passage?

(A) Black workers were not the primary audience for works produced by Black writers during the Harlem Renaissance.
(B) The number of works produced by Black writers has continued to increase annually since 1919.
(C) Langston Hughes created an unintentionally misleading portrait of Zora Neale Hurston in The Big Sea.
(D) Zora Neale Hurston is better known for her anthropological work than for her literary work.
(E) There was almost no market for works produced by Black writers during the Harlem Renaissance.


Why is C not the correct answer choice.

lines 45-50 state the following and the last line clearly states that Hughes words should not mislead people into believing that zora was soley an entertainer.

" As
Langston Hughes put it in The Big Sea, she "was
certainly the most amusing" of the Harlem Renais-
sance artists, "full of side-splitting anecdotes,
humorous tales, and tragicomic stories." Hughes's
words should not imply that she was solely an
entertainer.
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Re: Labeling Zora Neale Hurston "a writer of the Harlem Renaissance"  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Mar 2019, 23:21
GMATNinja SajjadAhmad VeritasKarishma
Why is C not the correct answer choice.

lines 45-50 state the following and the last line clearly states that Hughes words should not mislead people into believing that zora was soley an entertainer.

" As
Langston Hughes put it in The Big Sea, she "was
certainly the most amusing" of the Harlem Renais-
sance artists, "full of side-splitting anecdotes,
humorous tales, and tragicomic stories." Hughes's
words should not imply that she was solely an
entertainer.
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Re: Labeling Zora Neale Hurston "a writer of the Harlem Renaissance"  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Mar 2019, 06:22
2
Debashis Roy wrote:
GMATNinja SajjadAhmad VeritasKarishma
Why is C not the correct answer choice.

lines 45-50 state the following and the last line clearly states that Hughes words should not mislead people into believing that zora was soley an entertainer.

" As
Langston Hughes put it in The Big Sea, she "was
certainly the most amusing" of the Harlem Renais-
sance artists, "full of side-splitting anecdotes,
humorous tales, and tragicomic stories." Hughes's
words should not imply that she was solely an
entertainer.


Debashis Roy Ashokshiva
" Hughes's
words should not imply that she was solely an
entertainer." : what dos this mean ??? the author says that Hughes portrays ZL as an enyertainer ... BUT SHE is not ONLY an entertainer but something else too... This is what author says, Author does not discredit or dispute the claim that ZL was an entertainer , author rather says that she was NOT ONLY na entertainer BUT ALSO something else...

option C :(C) Langston Hughes created an unintentionally misleading portrait of Zora Neale Hurston in The Big Sea.

now was the claim by Hughes about ZOra "misleading" ...that is what is it somehwat wrong??? Author says that there is much more to ZORA... Hughes never says that zora was ONLY an entertainer..he just says that she was an entertainer...but author clarifies for the readers to not take zora as just an entertainer !!! so the claim by Hughes is not misleading/incorrect , rather the claim does not encompass all of her prersonality...no one is misleaded by knwoing that zora is an entertainer...zora actually IS an entertainer...but there is more to it which is not explcitly mentioned !!!

so info provided by Huges is definitley LIMITED but NOT MISLEADING...his claim is true ...but there are additional truths too....
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Re: Labeling Zora Neale Hurston "a writer of the Harlem Renaissance"  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Mar 2019, 09:03
AdityaHongunti

Thanks !!
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Re: Labeling Zora Neale Hurston "a writer of the Harlem Renaissance"  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Mar 2019, 22:36
AdityaHongunti
Thanks for explaining whats wrong with C..But how is A the answer...
Could you please help ..
Thanks
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Re: Labeling Zora Neale Hurston "a writer of the Harlem Renaissance"  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Mar 2019, 01:59
Debashis Roy wrote:
AdityaHongunti
Thanks for explaining whats wrong with C..But how is A the answer...
Could you please help ..
Thanks



Check the lines below and you will get the answer.


Quote:
They have come easily
enough to a whole generation of critics, but their
(10)
pithy summaries seldom reflect the wide divisions
between Blacks and Whites
, the Black intelligentsia
and Black workers, Black writers and their middle-
class audience, that marked the era.

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Re: Labeling Zora Neale Hurston "a writer of the Harlem Renaissance"   [#permalink] 29 Mar 2019, 01:59
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