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Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets

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Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets, such as blenders and food processors, which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.


(A) which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those

(B) which can inflict serious injuries such as those

(C) inflicting injuries as serious as that having been

(D) capable to inflict injuries as serious as that

(E) capable of inflicting injuries as serious as those


Verbal Question of The Day: Day 229: Sentence Correction


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Originally posted by naumyuk on 24 Dec 2015, 09:43.
Last edited by Bunuel on 26 Sep 2018, 03:05, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: QOTD: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Feb 2018, 17:39
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A big key to this question is the pronoun “those.” It’s a plural pronoun (also called a demonstrative pronoun if you like grammar jargon; “that” is the singular version, and it’s discussed in this article), and your best bet is to reread the sentence, replacing “those” with the plural noun it refers to.

With that in mind…

Quote:
(A) which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those

Well, the pronoun seems to be OK. “Those” seems to refer to the most recent plural, “injuries”, so that gives us: “… kitchen gadgets, such as blenders and food processors, which are able to inflict as serious injuries as [the injuries] caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.”

Trouble is, the phrase “…are able to inflict as serious injuries as…” isn’t quite right. We’re trying to emphasize the severity of the potential injuries from kitchen gadgets, so “injuries as serious as” would be much better than “as serious injuries as.” Actually, the latter version just doesn’t quite make sense.

You could also argue that the use of “which” isn’t ideal here. In general, modifiers beginning with “which” modify the immediately preceding noun. That isn’t an absolute rule, but I think there’s arguably some ambiguity in the phrase “… kitchen gadgets, such as blenders and food processors, which are…” Is this trying to say that kitchen gadgets in general can inflict serious injury, or just the food processors? The intent is clearly the former, but the “which” phrase MIGHT make that meaning a little bit muddy.

And even if you don’t believe a single word of that last paragraph, the “injuries as serious as” thing is pretty darned bad. Let’s eliminate (A).

Quote:
(B) which can inflict serious injuries such as those

(B) sounds pretty good! But it’s wrong anyway.

The phrase “such as” introduces examples, so if we say that kitchen gadgets “ can inflict serious injuries such as [the injuries] caused by an industrial wood-planing machine”, that’s literally saying that kitchen gadgets inflict exactly the same injuries as a wood-planing machine. And that’s not quite right: we want to say that the injuries inflicted by kitchen gadgets are just as serious – not that they’re exactly the same injuries.

So (B) is gone.

Quote:
(C) inflicting injuries as serious as that having been

This is a mess. For starters, the “-ing” modifier “inflicting” no longer suggests that the kitchen gadgets CAN inflict serious injuries; now the sentence implies that the kitchen gadgets ACTUALLY inflict serious injuries, and that’s not quite what the sentence is trying to say.

More importantly, the word “that” is used as a singular pronoun in (C), and it has no logical referent. (Again, for more on the GMAT’s many uses of the word “that”, check out this article.) Plus, I have no idea why we would use “having been” in this situation.

We can eliminate (C).

Quote:
(D) capable to inflict injuries as serious as that

You might know that I’m not really a proponent of studying idioms, but for whatever it’s worth: “capable to inflict” is a pretty crappy version of “capable of inflicting.”

But as is often the case on the GMAT, you can avoid the idiom entirely if you’re paying close attention to the other stuff. In this case, we have the singular pronoun “that” again, and it once again has no logical referent, since there are no singular nouns earlier in the sentence.

So even if you totally ignore the idiom, you can safely eliminate (D).

Quote:
(E) capable of inflicting injuries as serious as those

(E) is awfully similar to (D), except that we have a better idiom (“capable of inflicting” is better than “capable to inflict”), and now the pronoun (“those”) is plural. “Those” seems to refer to the most recent plural, “injuries”, so that gives us: “… high-speed electrical gadgets… capable of inflicting injuries as serious as the injuries caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.”

Hey, that’s clear as a bell. (E) is our answer.
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Dec 2015, 09:45
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naumyuk wrote:
Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets, such as blenders and food processors, which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.

(A) which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those
(B) which can inflict serious injuries such as those
(C) inflicting injuries as serious as that having been
(D) capable to inflict injuries as serious as that
(E) capable of inflicting injuries as serious as those



Here is official GMAC explanation:
The point of this sentence is the claim that common kitchen appliances can be as dangerous as an industrial wood-planing machine. It makes this point by comparing the injuries (plural) caused by blenders and food processors with those (also plural) caused by the wood-planing machine. An efficient way to make this comparison is to use the idiom capable of, an adjective phrase rather than a relative clause, after blenders and food processors.
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Dec 2015, 16:34
Hi! daagh,

I was confused between 'A' and 'D'. I am unable to see any mistake in 'A' as it says- blenders and food processors are able to inflict as serious injuries as those (injuries) caused by....... (as X as Y)

Could you please help shedding more light on the mistake in this option. Thanks
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Dec 2015, 21:00
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Quote:
I was confused between 'A' and 'D'. I am unable to see any mistake in 'A' as it says- blenders and food processors are able to inflict as serious injuries as those (injuries) caused by....... (as X as Y)
Could you please help shedding more light on the mistake in this option. Thanks


A is ALSO WRONG for the following reason :
A says: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets, such as blenders and food processors, which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.
----->the usage of "WHICH" is WRONG in A; "WHICH" has been used without COMMA in option A .The comma that you are seeing is for the following construction "such as blenders and food processors" AND NOT for "WHICH"

ALSO "ABLE TO" is WRONG in option A ---->it gives a sense that these "electrical gadgets" are doing this INTENTIONALLY !!
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 05 May 2017, 00:29
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This is a comparison between injuries caused by kitchen gadgets and wood planing machines. A says that the gadgets can cause those serious injuries as caused by the planing machines. Whereas E says that, the gadgets can cause many injuries including as the serious ones caused by the machines. The logical follow up is to ask whether the gadgets cannot cause less serious injuries. Yes, they can and, therefore, E wins by practical rationale. Capable of or able to is just a ploy, as I see it.

Of course, The OE throws no more light than announcing the OA, as we often tend to say in our explanations that X is better than Y, rather than say why.
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Originally posted by daagh on 30 Dec 2015, 05:47.
Last edited by daagh on 05 May 2017, 00:29, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2016, 04:45
a is wrong because, if I do not make a mistake

as+adjective +a+noun+as
is correct pattern
we do not have plural noun between as ... as

this point of grammar is too subtle and is purely grammatical and so is not focus of gmat sc. there is one gmatprep question which test this pattern. if this question appear on your test, are are on 750 score already.
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jan 2016, 09:42
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thangvietnam wrote:
a is wrong because, if I do not make a mistake

as+adjective +a+noun+as
is correct pattern
we do not have plural noun between as ... as

this point of grammar is too subtle and is purely grammatical and so is not focus of gmat sc. there is one gmatprep question which test this pattern. if this question appear on your test, are are on 750 score already.


I am not sure whether the point you mentioned is correct. Take this example:

It is as good a book as any.
They are as good books as any.

The second construction in plural does not seem to be wrong.

However, from concision aspect, option E is better than option A. I shall try to compare with a simpler example:

Option I: using a clause:I love football, which is the national game of Madland.
Option II: using a phrase: I love football, the national game of Madland.

Option II is obviously more concise than option I. This explanation seems to be the point in GMAC answer as mentioned by naumyak. (although the phrase used in the original sentence is an adjective phrase, not a noun phrase as is used here.)
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 25 Mar 2016, 11:44
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Discussing A and E:
One reason why A is not correct because it uses an unidiomatic (in the context) infinitive’ to inflict’ as though the gadgets intentionally cause the injuries. Capable of inflictive, an indicative idiom is better than the one in A.
In addition, one might note a subtle meaning error in A. The idea is to say that the gadgets can inflict injuries as serious as those caused by the woodcutters can. However, A distorts the logical intent by saying that they cause such serious injuries as those caused by the woodcutters. This implies that the gadgets can only cause injuries that are comparable in seriousness with the woodcutters and not less. Now we know the gadgets at worst cause as serious injuries as those by wood cutters and normally they are less serious.
I would say E is good.
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Originally posted by daagh on 28 Jan 2016, 09:47.
Last edited by daagh on 25 Mar 2016, 11:44, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Mar 2016, 08:25
Why E is better than B?

Is it only because the meaning the Daagh mentioned above?
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Mar 2016, 23:24
In"B" "which" is not required. Also there is a comparison. Hence "as" is correct usage not "such as.".So it is not a case where examples are required. Hence "such as" is not needed in "B."
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2017, 08:38
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Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets, such as blenders and food processors, which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.

Issue: Comparison

Analysis:
1. In this sentence we want to make sure that similar entities are being compared in the underlined clause i.e. injuries are compared with injuries

(A) which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those
- Redundant

(B) which can inflict serious injuries such as those
- "such as" changes the meaning of the sentence from what is originally intended.

(C) inflicting injuries as serious as that having been
- Incorrect comparison

(D) capable to inflict injuries as serious as that
- Incorrect idiom "capable to.."

(E) capable of inflicting injuries as serious as those

Answer: (E)
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2017, 01:19
Hi Experts,

I just wanted to clarify the comparison expression "As X As" in this question. If we have an expression: "As much X as Y", we make sure that X and Y are parallel elements that are being compared. Can you explain the usage of "As X As" expression for comparison? What 2 elements does it compare? Thanks a ton!
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2017, 01:37
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yt770 wrote:
Hi Experts,

I just wanted to clarify the comparison expression "As X As" in this question. If we have an expression: "As much X as Y", we make sure that X and Y are parallel elements that are being compared. Can you explain the usage of "As X As" expression for comparison? What 2 elements does it compare? Thanks a ton!


The parallel elements are "injuries" and "those".
"injuries" (inflicted by kitchen equipment) is compared with "those" (= injuries - cause by wood planing machines).

(In your structure "as X as", X is not an element of comparison: X = serious, an adjective - the structure here is "X as [adjective] as Y".)
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New post 30 Apr 2017, 01:45
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yt770, injuries are being compared to other injuries: "injuries as serious as those [injuries] caused by an industrial wood-planing machine."

In the form "as X as Y," X and Y are not the parallel elements. Rather, Y is parallel with whatever precedes the idiom. So if I say "this dog is as big as a cow," I am comparing the dog and the cow. In between, I've showed the trait that they have in common (being big). Similarly, in the original example, we are saying that injuries from kitchen gadgets and those (injuries) from wood-planning machines can be equally serious.
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Nov 2017, 23:00
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naumyuk wrote:
Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets, such as blenders and food processors, which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.

(A) which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those
(B) which can inflict serious injuries such as those
(C) inflicting injuries as serious as that having been
(D) capable to inflict injuries as serious as that
(E) capable of inflicting injuries as serious as those


A- "as serious as" is incorrect it is saying the gadgets able to inflict "as serious injuries".. compare "inflict damage" to "inflict as serious injuries"... it's not a good comparison. Eliminate
B- 'such as those' is used to provide examples of injury types. This answer choice really doesn't fit without adding a comma between injuries and such. Verb Tense is also incorrect 'having been' does not fit with past tense already established by 'equipped'..Eliminate
C- 'gadets...inflicting' implies they are designed to inflict..thats their job..'inflicting...' Eliminate.
D- capable to.... incorrect idiom. Capable of

E - Correct use of idiom 'capable of' plus 'as serious as' is correct comparison. Lock it in
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New post 02 Feb 2018, 19:11
Hi Experts!

I have a few questions in choice A.

1) I think some of the official questions uses "Noun" after the first "as" in 'as X as Y' construction and I believe that's okay. It's not a requirement to have an adjective or adverb for 'X' in 'as X as Y' construction. But in this question, the meaning would change because "as serious injuries as those caused by..." here we are saying that the gadgets will cause the same number of serious injuries as the number of injuries caused by industrial machine. The focus in this question is NOT on comparing the number of serious injuries but the "seriousness" of the injuries. Is my understanding correct here?

2) Can you tell me why "able to" is wrong here?

Thank you very much!

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New post 02 Feb 2018, 19:52
sdlife wrote:
But in this question, the meaning would change because "as serious injuries as those caused by..." here we are saying that the gadgets will cause the same number of serious injuries as the number of injuries caused by industrial machine. The focus in this question is NOT on comparing the number of serious injuries but the "seriousness" of the injuries. Is my understanding correct here?

Hi sdlife, if the intent was to compare the number of serious injuries, then the sentence would be:

..capable of inflicting as many serious injuries as.....
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New post 02 Feb 2018, 19:55
EducationAisle wrote:
Hi sdlife, if the intent was to compare the number of serious injuries, then the sentence would be:

..capable of inflicting as many serious injuries as.....


Thank you! Can you please tell what meaning comes out of choice A? And what's the issue with that comparison?
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Feb 2018, 20:07
The easiest way to eliminate A would be that which is modifying food processors, while the intent is to modify electrical gadgets.
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