GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 20 Nov 2018, 18:18

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in November
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
28293031123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
2526272829301
Open Detailed Calendar
  • All GMAT Club Tests are Free and open on November 22nd in celebration of Thanksgiving Day!

     November 22, 2018

     November 22, 2018

     10:00 PM PST

     11:00 PM PST

    Mark your calendars - All GMAT Club Tests are free and open November 22nd to celebrate Thanksgiving Day! Access will be available from 0:01 AM to 11:59 PM, Pacific Time (USA)
  • Free lesson on number properties

     November 23, 2018

     November 23, 2018

     10:00 PM PST

     11:00 PM PST

    Practice the one most important Quant section - Integer properties, and rapidly improve your skills.

Next month, state wildlife officials are scheduled to take over the

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

VP
VP
User avatar
G
Joined: 27 Mar 2010
Posts: 1022
Location: Bangalore, India
Re: Next month, state wildlife officials are scheduled to take over the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Oct 2018, 03:24
Hi Priyanka, relative pronouns (when in this case) follow similar rule as other modifiers:

Relative clauses should be placed as close as possible to what they are modifying.

Here, when is placed miles apart from next month.

Not a good construct.
_________________

Thanks,
Ashish
EducationAisle, Bangalore

Sentence Correction Nirvana available on Amazon.in and Flipkart

Now! Preview the entire Grammar Section of Sentence Correction Nirvana at pothi.com

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 08 Feb 2018
Posts: 87
GMAT 1: 670 Q50 V31
Next month, state wildlife officials are scheduled to take over the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Nov 2018, 04:03
Is it possible to get this question right without knowing how however is used in a sentence?
_________________

Kudos to Kudos :)

And yeah, definitely aim for a level of accuracy where managing time will not be a burden anymore.

Orion Director of Academics
User avatar
S
Joined: 19 Jul 2018
Posts: 97
Re: Next month, state wildlife officials are scheduled to take over the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Nov 2018, 06:52
While it helps to understand how however is used, it's not strictly necessary if you're focusing on just looking at whether the sentences are complete, incomplete, or runon.

Consider first the use of the semicolon: In (B) it's used correctly, as there is a complete sentence on either side. But in (D), what's to the right of the semicolon isn't a complete sentence, so you can't use a semicolon. Next look at that same spot, but at the comma. Remember that commas can't have a complete sentence on either side of them unless they have one of the FANBOYS (for, and, nor, but or, yet, so). You can't eliminate (A) based on this rule, but you can eliminate (C) since "however" isn't a valid word to use to link sentences with a comma.

Eliminating (E) is a matter of looking at the word "when". Since when should be used to talk about time. And while we are talking about a count taking place next month, the effect of the prey population on the wolf population doesn't happen next month. That's just illogical, so (E) is also out. For (A), you have a modifier containing the word "which". Whenever you see the word "which," that modifier needs to be right next to what it's modifying to prevent an illogical meaning. Notice that the modifier "the number of which" is right next to "area". This is illogical! You should be talking about the number of wolves, not the number of area.

So all in all, no, you don't need to know how to use 'however' here. :)
_________________

Laura
Academics Aficionado | ORION
GMAT self-study has never been more personalized or more fun. Try ORION Free!

Verbal Forum Moderator
User avatar
V
Status: Greatness begins beyond your comfort zone
Joined: 08 Dec 2013
Posts: 2128
Location: India
Concentration: General Management, Strategy
Schools: Kelley '20, ISB '19
GPA: 3.2
WE: Information Technology (Consulting)
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: Next month, state wildlife officials are scheduled to take over the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Nov 2018, 07:42
AbdurRakib wrote:
Next month, state wildlife officials are scheduled to take over the job of increasing the wolf population in the federally designated recovery area, the number of which will however ultimately be dictated by the number of prey in the area.

(A) area, the number of which will however
(B) area; the size of the population, however, will
(C) area, however the number of wolves will
(D) area; the number of which will, however,
(E) area, when the size of the population will, however,


In A, the pronoun which tries to refer to designated recovery area and this reference is illogical.

Next month, state wildlife officials are scheduled to take over the job of increasing the wolf population, the number of which --> Which here refers to "wolf population".

Can which refer to wolf ? (I know that we need wolves because number of wolf is incorrect but if we ignore this fact for the moment) I also think wolf here is just an adjective that modifies population.(Pronouns can only refer to Noun but wolf in the phrase wolf population in an adjective)

In other words - xxxx adjective noun, which --- Can which refer ONLY to the adjective ? I think it can refer to the entire phrase - adjective noun


Next month, state wildlife officials are scheduled to take over the job of increasing the population of wolves, the number of which --> here which can refer to wolves because the number of population of wolves DOES NOT make sense.

AjiteshArun , GMATNinja , MagooshExpert , VeritasPrepBrian, GMATGuruNY , VeritasKarishma , DmitryFarber , RonPurewal , egmat , other experts - please enlighten
_________________

When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it. - Henry Ford
The Moment You Think About Giving Up, Think Of The Reason Why You Held On So Long
+1 Kudos if you find this post helpful

SVP
SVP
User avatar
V
Joined: 15 Jul 2015
Posts: 1846
Location: India
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V169
Re: Next month, state wildlife officials are scheduled to take over the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Nov 2018, 18:43
Skywalker18 wrote:
In A, the pronoun which tries to refer to designated recovery area and this reference is illogical.

Next month, state wildlife officials are scheduled to take over the job of increasing the wolf population, the number of which --> Which here refers to "wolf population".

Can which refer to wolf ? (I know that we need wolves because number of wolf is incorrect but if we ignore this fact for the moment) I also think wolf here is just an adjective that modifies population.(Pronouns can only refer to Noun but wolf in the phrase wolf population in an adjective)

In other words - xxxx adjective noun, which --- Can which refer ONLY to the adjective ? I think it can refer to the entire phrase - adjective noun


Next month, state wildlife officials are scheduled to take over the job of increasing the population of wolves, the number of which --> here which can refer to wolves because the number of population of wolves DOES NOT make sense.

AjiteshArun , GMATNinja , MagooshExpert , VeritasPrepBrian, GMATGuruNY , VeritasKarishma , DmitryFarber , RonPurewal , egmat , other experts - please enlighten
The which should refer to the entire noun phrase in that kind of construction.

Indian food, which is very spicy...

Here, the which clearly refers to Indian food, and the sentence is not trying to say either that Indian is spicy or that food (generally) is spicy. I can't think of an exception to this.

In something like the ingredients of the dish, which... the which can point to either dish alone or the ingredients of the dish.
_________________

Ascore Prep | Live Online

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 08 Feb 2018
Posts: 87
GMAT 1: 670 Q50 V31
Re: Next month, state wildlife officials are scheduled to take over the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Nov 2018, 04:54
Skywalker18 wrote:
AbdurRakib wrote:
Next month, state wildlife officials are scheduled to take over the job of increasing the wolf population in the federally designated recovery area, the number of which will however ultimately be dictated by the number of prey in the area.

(A) area, the number of which will however
(B) area; the size of the population, however, will
(C) area, however the number of wolves will
(D) area; the number of which will, however,
(E) area, when the size of the population will, however,


In A, the pronoun which tries to refer to designated recovery area and this reference is illogical.

Next month, state wildlife officials are scheduled to take over the job of increasing the wolf population, the number of which --> Which here refers to "wolf population".

Can which refer to wolf ? (I know that we need wolves because number of wolf is incorrect but if we ignore this fact for the moment) I also think wolf here is just an adjective that modifies population.(Pronouns can only refer to Noun but wolf in the phrase wolf population in an adjective)

In other words - xxxx adjective noun, which --- Can which refer ONLY to the adjective ? I think it can refer to the entire phrase - adjective noun


Next month, state wildlife officials are scheduled to take over the job of increasing the population of wolves, the number of which --> here which can refer to wolves because the number of population of wolves DOES NOT make sense.

AjiteshArun , GMATNinja , MagooshExpert , VeritasPrepBrian, GMATGuruNY , VeritasKarishma , DmitryFarber , RonPurewal , egmat , other experts - please enlighten



LauraOrion,

Based on this point:

Quote:
Next month, state wildlife officials are scheduled to take over the job of increasing the population of wolves, the number of which --> here which can refer to wolves because the number of population of wolves DOES NOT make sense.
by Skywalker18, why is the part after semi-colon in option D not a sentence?
_________________

Kudos to Kudos :)

And yeah, definitely aim for a level of accuracy where managing time will not be a burden anymore.

Orion Director of Academics
User avatar
S
Joined: 19 Jul 2018
Posts: 97
Re: Next month, state wildlife officials are scheduled to take over the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Nov 2018, 10:07
akshaykotha - As stated in the OA, the portion after the semicolon isn't a complete sentence. It's a modifier and because of that it needs to be part of the sentence that it's modifying. There is also a logical error, as pointed out, so you can eliminate for either reason.
_________________

Laura
Academics Aficionado | ORION
GMAT self-study has never been more personalized or more fun. Try ORION Free!

GMAT Club Bot
Re: Next month, state wildlife officials are scheduled to take over the &nbs [#permalink] 06 Nov 2018, 10:07

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 27 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Next month, state wildlife officials are scheduled to take over the

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.