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Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial

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Re: Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2018, 01:50
Can we eliminate B,C and E just by this phrase"Not all women". I thought this phrase is wrong so i eliminated these 3 options?

Is this the wrong approach. I thought meaning was not properly conveyed by this phrase?

Help me with this.
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Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jul 2018, 11:38
mikemcgarry wrote:
avohden wrote:
Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.

A. Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.
B. Not all women, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancer.
C. Not all women, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if they carry a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancer.
D. Not every woman, even the ones who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.
E. Not all women, even the ones who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, considered a serious risk factor for that cancer.

Dear avohden,
I'm happy to help with this one.

Split #1: SV Agreement with indefinite pronouns. See:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-sente ... agreement/
The phrase "every woman" is singular, and demands the singular verb "wants".
The phrase "all women" is plural, and demands the plural verb "want".
Choices (C) & (D) make SV Agreement errors, so they are wrong.

Split #2: pronoun agreement with indefinite pronouns.
The phrase "every woman" is singular, and demands the singular pronoun "she".
The phrase "all women" is plural, and demands the plural pronoun "they".
Choices (B) & (D) make pronoun agreement errors, so they are wrong.

Just with those two, that's enough to isolate (A) as the only possible answer.

What's intriguing about this sentence is that it has all kinds of splits that are not really relevant to the question --- ultimately, false splits, because either way is correct.
(1) We could say this statement about "every woman" or "all women", and as long as verbs & pronouns match, it would be fine.
(2) Either "even those" or "even ones" is perfectly correct.
(3) Two options for modifying the mutation:
"...a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer." ---- an appositive phrase; see:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-gramm ... e-phrases/
"...a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancerr." --- a subordinate clause, acting as noun modifier. See:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-gramm ... d-clauses/
The first might be a tad wordier, but both are grammatically correct and sound natural.
Good tempting false splits are the sign of a very well written SC problem.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Hi mike , @Abhimanha , daagh Sir,
I got a doubt,
Not every woman (Singular) , even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.

Here the red part is _ Singular, So what does that plural pronoun WHOSE stand for ?

Please explain why a plural pronoun is used for singular noun.
If it is allowed under what conditions we need use plural pronoun for singular noun ?

Thank you
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Re: Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jul 2018, 11:53
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Considering that this is not an official question, there is no need to bother over a parenthesis. The more important issues are the Sub-Verb and sub-pronoun matchings.
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Re: Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial   [#permalink] 07 Jul 2018, 11:53

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