It is currently 21 Oct 2017, 10:55

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

2 KUDOS received
Director
Director
User avatar
Status: 1,750 Q's attempted and counting
Affiliations: University of Florida
Joined: 09 Jul 2013
Posts: 514

Kudos [?]: 989 [2], given: 630

Location: United States (FL)
Schools: UFL (A)
GMAT 1: 600 Q45 V29
GMAT 2: 590 Q35 V35
GMAT 3: 570 Q42 V28
GMAT 4: 610 Q44 V30
GPA: 3.45
WE: Accounting (Accounting)
Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Nov 2013, 10:18
2
This post received
KUDOS
13
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  65% (hard)

Question Stats:

56% (01:05) correct 44% (01:19) wrong based on 738 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.

A. Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.

B. Not all women, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancer.

C. Not all women, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if they carry a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancer.

D. Not every woman, even the ones who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.

E. Not all women, even the ones who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, considered a serious risk factor for that cancer.


oe to follow
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Kudos [?]: 989 [2], given: 630

Expert Post
9 KUDOS received
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4426

Kudos [?]: 8455 [9], given: 102

Re: Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Nov 2013, 17:33
9
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
9
This post was
BOOKMARKED
avohden wrote:
Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.

A. Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.
B. Not all women, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancer.
C. Not all women, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if they carry a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancer.
D. Not every woman, even the ones who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.
E. Not all women, even the ones who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, considered a serious risk factor for that cancer.

Dear avohden,
I'm happy to help with this one.

Split #1: SV Agreement with indefinite pronouns. See:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-sente ... agreement/
The phrase "every woman" is singular, and demands the singular verb "wants".
The phrase "all women" is plural, and demands the plural verb "want".
Choices (C) & (D) make SV Agreement errors, so they are wrong.

Split #2: pronoun agreement with indefinite pronouns.
The phrase "every woman" is singular, and demands the singular pronoun "she".
The phrase "all women" is plural, and demands the plural pronoun "they".
Choices (B) & (D) make pronoun agreement errors, so they are wrong.

Just with those two, that's enough to isolate (A) as the only possible answer.

What's intriguing about this sentence is that it has all kinds of splits that are not really relevant to the question --- ultimately, false splits, because either way is correct.
(1) We could say this statement about "every woman" or "all women", and as long as verbs & pronouns match, it would be fine.
(2) Either "even those" or "even ones" is perfectly correct.
(3) Two options for modifying the mutation:
"...a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer." ---- an appositive phrase; see:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-gramm ... e-phrases/
"...a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancerr." --- a subordinate clause, acting as noun modifier. See:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-gramm ... d-clauses/
The first might be a tad wordier, but both are grammatically correct and sound natural.
Good tempting false splits are the sign of a very well written SC problem.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Kudos [?]: 8455 [9], given: 102

1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 04 Oct 2013
Posts: 87

Kudos [?]: 86 [1], given: 45

Location: Brazil
GMAT 1: 660 Q45 V35
GMAT 2: 710 Q49 V38
Reviews Badge
Re: Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Nov 2013, 10:06
1
This post received
KUDOS
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
mikemcgarry wrote:
avohden wrote:
Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.

A. Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.
B. Not all women, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancer.
C. Not all women, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if they carry a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancer.
D. Not every woman, even the ones who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.
E. Not all women, even the ones who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, considered a serious risk factor for that cancer.

Dear avohden,
I'm happy to help with this one.

Split #1: SV Agreement with indefinite pronouns. See:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-sente ... agreement/
The phrase "every woman" is singular, and demands the singular verb "wants".
The phrase "all women" is plural, and demands the plural verb "want".
Choices (C) & (D) make SV Agreement errors, so they are wrong.

Split #2: pronoun agreement with indefinite pronouns.
The phrase "every woman" is singular, and demands the singular pronoun "she".
The phrase "all women" is plural, and demands the plural pronoun "they".
Choices (B) & (D) make pronoun agreement errors, so they are wrong.

Just with those two, that's enough to isolate (A) as the only possible answer.

What's intriguing about this sentence is that it has all kinds of splits that are not really relevant to the question --- ultimately, false splits, because either way is correct.
(1) We could say this statement about "every woman" or "all women", and as long as verbs & pronouns match, it would be fine.
(2) Either "even those" or "even ones" is perfectly correct.
(3) Two options for modifying the mutation:
"...a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer." ---- an appositive phrase; see:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-gramm ... e-phrases/
"...a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancerr." --- a subordinate clause, acting as noun modifier. See:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-gramm ... d-clauses/
The first might be a tad wordier, but both are grammatically correct and sound natural.
Good tempting false splits are the sign of a very well written SC problem.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Hi Mike,

There is something I quite don't get in the correct sentence.

As you said, "not every woman" is singular. But then, when it comes to specify the "singular" woman, the sentence use "those". Is it logical to refer back to a singular noun with "those"?

Kudos [?]: 86 [1], given: 45

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Status: Student
Joined: 26 Aug 2013
Posts: 253

Kudos [?]: 68 [0], given: 401

Location: France
Concentration: Finance, General Management
Schools: EMLYON FT'16
GMAT 1: 650 Q47 V32
GPA: 3.44
Re: Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Nov 2013, 13:33
avohden wrote:
Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.

A. Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.

B. Not all women, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancer.

C. Not all women, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if they carry a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancer.

D. Not every woman, even the ones who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.

E. Not all women, even the ones who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, considered a serious risk factor for that cancer.


oe to follow


In this one, I did not know if "Not every woman was" was correct or not.
But I find it right in less than 2 minutes.

This was my process:

A. Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer. - Correct

B. Not all women, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancer. - She is not correct because sentence is plural

C. Not all women, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if they carry a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancer. -They is not correct because sentence is singular

D. Not every woman, even the ones who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer. She is not correct because sentence is plural

E. Not all women, even the ones who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, considered a serious risk factor for that cancer She is not correct because sentence is plural
_________________

Think outside the box

Kudos [?]: 68 [0], given: 401

Expert Post
4 KUDOS received
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4426

Kudos [?]: 8455 [4], given: 102

Re: Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Nov 2013, 16:18
4
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
2
This post was
BOOKMARKED
nechets wrote:
Hi Mike,

There is something I quite don't get in the correct sentence.

As you said, "not every woman" is singular. But then, when it comes to specify the "singular" woman, the sentence use "those". Is it logical to refer back to a singular noun with "those"?

Dear nechets,
OK, you asked a very subtle question, and I am happy to help. :-)

The expression "every woman", or "not every woman", are grammatically singular, but of course, logically, we know we are referring to more than one woman in this statement. The word "those" does not refer to all of the women, but to a subgroup, the women who have meet a particular condition. It's perfectly fine to refer to the whole group by a singular indefinite form, and the subgroup as a plural set. Again, logically, we know the whole group contains a lot of individual women, even though it's represented in a grammatically singular form, so there's no problem that a subgroup is plural.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Kudos [?]: 8455 [4], given: 102

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 07 Jan 2013
Posts: 33

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 28

GMAT 1: 570 Q43 V26
GMAT 2: 610 Q47 V28
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Nov 2013, 07:50
avohden wrote:
Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.

A. Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.

B. Not all women, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancer.

C. Not all women, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if they carry a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancer.

D. Not every woman, even the ones who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.

E. Not all women, even the ones who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, considered a serious risk factor for that cancer.


oe to follow



The fastest way I found to solve this question is as follow.

A: wants (Singular) carries(Singular) Correct
B: want (plural) carries(Singular) Wrong
C: wants (Singular) carry (Plural) Wrong
D: want (plural) carries(Singular) Wrong
E: want (plural) carries(Singular) Wrong

I hope it helps

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 28

Director
Director
User avatar
Status: 1,750 Q's attempted and counting
Affiliations: University of Florida
Joined: 09 Jul 2013
Posts: 514

Kudos [?]: 989 [0], given: 630

Location: United States (FL)
Schools: UFL (A)
GMAT 1: 600 Q45 V29
GMAT 2: 590 Q35 V35
GMAT 3: 570 Q42 V28
GMAT 4: 610 Q44 V30
GPA: 3.45
WE: Accounting (Accounting)
Re: Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Nov 2013, 11:25
Official Explanation

Answer A
- In this example, you must make sure that you have proper agreement between both the subject and verb and the pronoun and antecedent. Only (A) contains proper agreement on both counts. In (B) the singular “she” improperly refers back to the plural subject women. In (C) “Not all women…wants” is an error of subject-verb agreement. Likewise in (D), “Not every woman…want” contains a similar error. (E), like (B) improperly uses “she” to refer to “women” Only (A) uses the proper “wants” and “she” to go with the singular subject woman.

Kudos [?]: 989 [0], given: 630

Current Student
avatar
Joined: 17 Mar 2014
Posts: 40

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 34

Location: India
Concentration: Strategy, Marketing
GMAT 1: 760 Q50 V44
WE: Medicine and Health (Health Care)
Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Dec 2014, 07:16
mikemcgarry wrote:
nechets wrote:
Hi Mike,

There is something I quite don't get in the correct sentence.

As you said, "not every woman" is singular. But then, when it comes to specify the "singular" woman, the sentence use "those". Is it logical to refer back to a singular noun with "those"?

Dear nechets,
OK, you asked a very subtle question, and I am happy to help. :-)

The expression "every woman", or "not every woman", are grammatically singular, but of course, logically, we know we are referring to more than one woman in this statement. The word "those" does not refer to all of the women, but to a subgroup, the women who have meet a particular condition. It's perfectly fine to refer to the whole group by a singular indefinite form, and the subgroup as a plural set. Again, logically, we know the whole group contains a lot of individual women, even though it's represented in a grammatically singular form, so there's no problem that a subgroup is plural.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)

Mike ,
Are these 3 sentences correct on GMAT:
1. The GDP of Brazil is larger than those of India and Korea.
2. The GDPs of India and Korea are smaller than that of Brazil.
3. The melting points of most metals are 100 degrees above room temperature, but that of mercury is below 0 degree.

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 34

Expert Post
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4426

Kudos [?]: 8455 [0], given: 102

Re: Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Dec 2014, 09:43
Expert's post
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
tushain wrote:
Mike ,
Are these 3 sentences correct on GMAT:
1. The GDP of Brazil is larger than those of India and Korea.
2. The GDPs of India and Korea are smaller than that of Brazil.
3. The melting points of most metals are 100 degrees above room temperature, but that of mercury is below 0 degree.

Dear tushain,
My friend, this is subtle. In math, you can make up your own examples of math questions ("would this be right?" questions), and chances are, it will be clean question, focused only on the math about which you intend to ask. Verbal is very different.

For example, the first is fine as a demonstrative example sentence illustrating a grammar point, but that doesn't mean it's ideal as a GMAT sentence. You have to understand, the standards for the GMAT SC are very high --- the sentence has to be grammatically correct, the logic must be flawless, and the topic must be meaningful and interesting. This sentence is too short, too simple, to even begin to qualify as a proper GMAT SC sentence. The grammar is correct in #1 & #2, and yes, the grammar there could appear in a much more complex and meaningful sentence as the correct answer to a SC question. The grammar could appear, but these particular sentences are too short and simple to appear.

The logical construction of the comparison is shaky in #2 --- are we comparing the sum of those in India & Korea to that of Brazil, or are we comparing them separately and independently? Also, "smaller" is not the most natural word --- we need "less" to compare numbers. You see, in trying to ask about grammar, you introduced a number of other problems. One suggestion:
2. The GDP of India, like that of Korea, is less than that of Brazil.
Now, this is grammatically & logically correct, although I don't think it's long and complex enough that we could make a good SC question out of it.

The final sentence is grammatically correct as well, and this is starting to get to a level of length and complexity such that it might quality for a good SC sentence.

It's important to keep two very different things in mind: (a) could the grammar in the sentence appear in a larger sentence on the GMAT? vs. (b) could the sentence itself appear on the GMAT? Certainly for #1 & #3, we could say "yes" to (a), but probably not to (b).

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Kudos [?]: 8455 [0], given: 102

Current Student
avatar
Joined: 17 Mar 2014
Posts: 40

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 34

Location: India
Concentration: Strategy, Marketing
GMAT 1: 760 Q50 V44
WE: Medicine and Health (Health Care)
Re: Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Dec 2014, 10:56
mikemcgarry wrote:
tushain wrote:
Mike ,
Are these 3 sentences correct on GMAT:
1. The GDP of Brazil is larger than those of India and Korea.
2. The GDPs of India and Korea are smaller than that of Brazil.
3. The melting points of most metals are 100 degrees above room temperature, but that of mercury is below 0 degree.

Dear tushain,
My friend, this is subtle. In math, you can make up your own examples of math questions ("would this be right?" questions), and chances are, it will be clean question, focused only on the math about which you intend to ask. Verbal is very different.

For example, the first is fine as a demonstrative example sentence illustrating a grammar point, but that doesn't mean it's ideal as a GMAT sentence. You have to understand, the standards for the GMAT SC are very high --- the sentence has to be grammatically correct, the logic must be flawless, and the topic must be meaningful and interesting. This sentence is too short, too simple, to even begin to qualify as a proper GMAT SC sentence. The grammar is correct in #1 & #2, and yes, the grammar there could appear in a much more complex and meaningful sentence as the correct answer to a SC question. The grammar could appear, but these particular sentences are too short and simple to appear.

The logical construction of the comparison is shaky in #2 --- are we comparing the sum of those in India & Korea to that of Brazil, or are we comparing them separately and independently? Also, "smaller" is not the most natural word --- we need "less" to compare numbers. You see, in trying to ask about grammar, you introduced a number of other problems. One suggestion:
2. The GDP of India, like that of Korea, is less than that of Brazil.
Now, this is grammatically & logically correct, although I don't think it's long and complex enough that we could make a good SC question out of it.

The final sentence is grammatically correct as well, and this is starting to get to a level of length and complexity such that it might quality for a good SC sentence.

It's important to keep two very different things in mind: (a) could the grammar in the sentence appear in a larger sentence on the GMAT? vs. (b) could the sentence itself appear on the GMAT? Certainly for #1 & #3, we could say "yes" to (a), but probably not to (b).

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)

Mike, "those" in #1 stands for GDP "
"that in #2 stands for GDPs"
"that in #3 stands for melting points "
How is pronoun usage okay? i dont understand :(

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 34

Expert Post
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4426

Kudos [?]: 8455 [0], given: 102

Re: Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Dec 2014, 07:04
tushain wrote:
Mike, "those" in #1 stands for GDP "
"that in #2 stands for GDPs"
"that in #3 stands for melting points "
How is pronoun usage okay? i dont understand :(

Dear tushain,
The pronouns "this," "that," "these," and "those" are demonstrative pronouns. Their rules are somewhat different from the rules for personal pronouns (he, she, they, etc.) Magoosh has grammar lessons explaining this distinction in detail. I highly recommend joining Magoosh to see those lessons.
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Kudos [?]: 8455 [0], given: 102

GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 10110

Kudos [?]: 263 [0], given: 0

Premium Member
Re: Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Jul 2016, 05:03
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.

Kudos [?]: 263 [0], given: 0

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Status: The best is yet to come.....
Joined: 10 Mar 2013
Posts: 450

Kudos [?]: 179 [0], given: 186

GMAT ToolKit User CAT Tests
Re: Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Feb 2017, 23:34
EMPOWERgmatRichC

Isn't 'those who' redundant?

In the following link https://gmatclub.com/forum/in-a-blow-to ... 39698.html it is saying that when those is used as pronoun using 'those who' is redundant.
_________________

Hasan Mahmud

Kudos [?]: 179 [0], given: 186

Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Verbal Expert
User avatar
S
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 3157

Kudos [?]: 3312 [1], given: 22

Location: Germany
Schools: HHL Leipzig
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Feb 2017, 10:28
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
Mahmud6 wrote:
EMPOWERgmatRichC

Isn't 'those who' redundant?

In the following link https://gmatclub.com/forum/in-a-blow-to ... 39698.html it is saying that when those is used as pronoun using 'those who' is redundant.


Consider this way:

Even women who have a strong familial history of breast cancer want to know..

The pronoun "those" can be used to replace "women" (create a new copy of "women") and hence "those who" is alright. However I remember a point discussed in Manhattan SC guide that states that if the antecedent is singular and the new copy of the antecedent is plural, it is required to use the plural noun itself rather than the pronoun "those" (and vice versa), because a plural pronoun cannot refer to a singular antecedent (and vice versa). Hence here the word "women" should have been used.

Note that in option A, the subject is singular (every woman), and hence the verb "wants" is also singular. However the part "even women who...) is a modifier providing additional information about "every woman"- Such reference does not seem logical to me. The correct construction would be:
Not all women, even those who...., want to know.

I saw the question referred to in your link. The use of "those" seems wrong to me (even in OA). Unlike this question, the question you referred uses "those" as a demonstrative adjective, not a pronoun that creates a new copy of an antecedent noun. Hence there should have been a noun after "those" (e.g. those people - otherwise a personal pronoun "them" could be OK, if it were clear who "them" refers to). There is no redundancy issue as such in that question.

Kudos [?]: 3312 [1], given: 22

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 04 Sep 2015
Posts: 479

Kudos [?]: 77 [0], given: 18

Location: India
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Feb 2017, 14:06
Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.



A. Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.

B. Not all women, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancer.

C. Not all women, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if they carry a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancer.

D. Not every woman, even the ones who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.

E. Not all women, even the ones who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, considered a serious risk factor for that cancer.


Good question,
subject is every women:singluar
verb is wants:singular
pronoun is she:singular
prepositional phrase: even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer

Option A is correct.

Kudos [?]: 77 [0], given: 18

VP
VP
User avatar
D
Joined: 14 Nov 2016
Posts: 1174

Kudos [?]: 1183 [0], given: 415

Location: Malaysia
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 May 2017, 17:29
Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.

A. Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.

B. Not all women, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancer.

C. Not all women, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if they carry a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancer.

D. Not every woman, even the ones who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.

E. Not all women, even the ones who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, considered a serious risk factor for that cancer.

What is "those" in (A) refer to?
_________________

"Be challenged at EVERY MOMENT."

“Strength doesn’t come from what you can do. It comes from overcoming the things you once thought you couldn’t.”

"Each stage of the journey is crucial to attaining new heights of knowledge."

Rules for posting in verbal forum | Please DO NOT post short answer in your post!

Kudos [?]: 1183 [0], given: 415

Expert Post
Verbal Expert
User avatar
S
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 3157

Kudos [?]: 3312 [0], given: 22

Location: Germany
Schools: HHL Leipzig
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jun 2017, 05:35
hazelnut wrote:
Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.

A. Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.

B. Not all women, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancer.

C. Not all women, even those who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, wants to know if they carry a BRCA mutation, which is a serious risk factor for that cancer.

D. Not every woman, even the ones who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, a serious risk factor for that cancer.

E. Not all women, even the ones who have a strong familial history of breast cancer, want to know if she carries a BRCA mutation, considered a serious risk factor for that cancer.

What is "those" in (A) refer to?


Your query has already been discussed here:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/not-every-wo ... l#p1803789

Kudos [?]: 3312 [0], given: 22

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Status: The best is yet to come.....
Joined: 10 Mar 2013
Posts: 450

Kudos [?]: 179 [0], given: 186

GMAT ToolKit User CAT Tests
Re: Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Oct 2017, 10:55
sayantanc2k wrote:
Mahmud6 wrote:
EMPOWERgmatRichC

Isn't 'those who' redundant?

In the following link https://gmatclub.com/forum/in-a-blow-to ... 39698.html it is saying that when those is used as pronoun using 'those who' is redundant.


Consider this way:

Even women who have a strong familial history of breast cancer want to know..

The pronoun "those" can be used to replace "women" (create a new copy of "women") and hence "those who" is alright.
.........
I saw the question referred to in your link. The use of "those" seems wrong to me (even in OA). Unlike this question, the question you referred uses "those" as a demonstrative adjective, not a pronoun that creates a new copy of an antecedent noun. Hence there should have been a noun after "those" (e.g. those people - otherwise a personal pronoun "them" could be OK, if it were clear who "them" refers to). There is no redundancy issue as such in that question.


Just to be more clear…

Theory: ‘Those who’ is correct, if it is clear what ‘those’ refers to.

Would you please help me to find out what does 'those' refer to in the following correct sentences?

While some propose to combat widespread illegal copying of computer programs by attempting to change people's attitudes toward pirating, others suggest reducing software prices to decrease the incentive for pirating, and still others are calling for the prosecution of those who copy software illegally. https://gmatclub.com/forum/while-some-p ... 51395.html

The PTA decided that just as alcohol is discussed in health class to protect those who might actually abuse it, other drugs should also be covered to prevent students from falling prey to addiction. https://gmatclub.com/forum/the-pta-deci ... 21967.html

Those who maintain that technology is negatively rewiring our brains have several common targets: with GPS devices our ability to conceptualize space is eroded, with the Internet’s many hyperlinks we are driven to distraction, and with our smartphones our working memory is impaired when doing something as fundamental as recalling a string of digits. Magoosh, https://gmatclub.com/forum/those-who-ma ... 03263.html
_________________

Hasan Mahmud

Kudos [?]: 179 [0], given: 186

Re: Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial   [#permalink] 06 Oct 2017, 10:55
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Not every woman, even those who have a strong familial

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.