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Schistosomiasis, a disease caused by a parasitic worm, is prevalent in

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Re: Schistosomiasis, a disease caused by a parasitic worm, is prevalent in  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2019, 18:32
1
The Question has been changed in the OG 2019 Verbal Review:
The Option C now has been restated to:
(c) freshwater snails which become the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycles

this in fact makes the selection of answer between A and C tougher.
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New post 08 Jul 2019, 20:03
sachinraja wrote:
The Question has been changed in the OG 2019 Verbal Review:
The Option C now has been restated to:
(c) freshwater snails which become the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycles

this in fact makes the selection of answer between A and C tougher.
I don't think there is any official version of this question with a becomes there. Probably just a typo in the question here rather than a change made by the GMAC.
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New post 08 Jul 2019, 20:11
AjiteshArun wrote:
sachinraja wrote:
The Question has been changed in the OG 2019 Verbal Review:
The Option C now has been restated to:
(c) freshwater snails which become the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycles

this in fact makes the selection of answer between A and C tougher.
I don't think there is any official version of this question with a becomes there. Probably just a typo in the question here rather than a change made by the GMAC.



Yeah, but lot of people used that as a reason (S-V issue) to eliminate option C.
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Re: Schistosomiasis, a disease caused by a parasitic worm, is prevalent in  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2019, 05:04
sachinraja wrote:
AjiteshArun wrote:
sachinraja wrote:
The Question has been changed in the OG 2019 Verbal Review:
The Option C now has been restated to:
(c) freshwater snails which become the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycles

this in fact makes the selection of answer between A and C tougher.
I don't think there is any official version of this question with a becomes there. Probably just a typo in the question here rather than a change made by the GMAC.



Yeah, but lot of people used that as a reason (S-V issue) to eliminate option C.


I'm confused. Doesn't the verb "become" agree with the subject "freshwater snails?" Why are you saying it's an SV issue, am I missing something?
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Re: Schistosomiasis, a disease caused by a parasitic worm, is prevalent in  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Oct 2019, 21:36
getzonator wrote:
Schistosomiasis, a disease caused by a parasitic worm, is prevalent in hot, humid climates, and it has become more widespread as irrigation projects have enlarged the habitat of the freshwater snails that are the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycle.


A. the freshwater snails that are the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycle

B. the freshwater snails that are the parasite's hosts in part of their life cycle

C. freshwater snails which become the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycles

D. freshwater snails which become the hosts of the parasite during the parasite's life cycles

E. parasite's hosts, freshwater snails which become their hosts during their life cycles

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 268: Sentence Correction


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Question # 92 from the Verbal Review - 2nd Edition of the Official Guide - Sentence Correction (page 310)


https://www.nytimes.com/1985/07/27/us/drop-in-drug-cost-may-allow-all-out-attack-on-a-parasite.html

Like other drugs used to treat schistosomiasis, praziquantel does not kill all the parasites in a person's body but reduces their number until the symptoms disappear. Unlike malaria parasites, those for schistosomiasis cannot multiply in the body. Once their population is reduced it remains low unless the victim is infected again.

Freshwater snails are the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycle, just as mosquitoes are hosts for malaria. The disease is prevalent in hot, humid climates and has become more widespread as irrigation projects have enlarged the habitat of the snails.


Error analysis:

Can't identify an error. Let's move and compare if choices give some hint

B: their is wrong pronoun. rejected
C: which needs a comma. rejected
D: same as C
E: same as C

A is the best choice.
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New post 13 Oct 2019, 06:21
GMATNinja wrote:
Quote:
A. the freshwater snails that are the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycle

I don’t have a whole lot to say about (A). The first thing I notice is the modifier “that are the parasite’s hosts” – and that seems like a reasonable way to modify “the freshwater snails.”

The pronoun “its” also jumps out at me, and that would have to refer to “the parasite’s”, since that’s our nearest (and most logical) singular. And that’s fine, too: “…the freshwater snails that are the parasite’s hosts for part of [the parasite’s] life cycle…” Reasonable enough.

So I guess we’ll keep (A).

Quote:
B. the freshwater snails that are the parasite's hosts in part of their life cycle

The biggest difference between (B) and (A) is the plural pronoun “their” in (B). And that’s a problem: “their” is plural, so it has to refer to either “the freshwater snails” or “the parasite’s hosts” – and those are the same thing, anyway. So that gives us: “… the freshwater snails that are the parasite’s hosts in part of [the freshwater snails’] life cycle.”

That’s not WRONG, exactly, if you’re willing to assume that the sentence is trying to explain what happens during the snails’ life cycle. But I think that misses the point: schistosomiasis is the grammatical subject of the sentence, and the sentence is clearly trying to explain why the disease has become more common. So presumably, the sentence is interested in explaining that the snails are hosts during part of the parasite’s life cycle. The snail’s life cycle really isn’t of interest to us, and wouldn’t help explain why the parasite has become more common.

So that’s miserably subtle, but it’s basically all we’ve got, unless you want to make an unnecessarily big deal out of the prepositions. (A) is better than (B), so we can eliminate (B).

Quote:
C. freshwater snails which becomes the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycles

(C) is a little bit easier to eliminate than some of the other options. The phrase “its life cycles” really doesn’t make any sense at all: “its” presumably refers to “the parasite”, since that’s the closest (and most logical) singular noun. But then how is that “the parasite” has multiple “life cycles”? As far as I know, each parasite only has one life cycle. If not, that would be creepy AF.

There’s also a problem with the phrase “freshwater snails which becomes.” Snails are plural, so the verb would have to be “become”, not “becomes.” Plus, “which” is generally a non-restrictive modifier, so it usually follows a comma – though that’s not usually a deciding factor on GMAT questions.

So we have lots of reasons to ditch (C).

Quote:
D. freshwater snails which become the hosts of the parasite during the parasite's life cycles

(D) is a little bit better than (C)… but only a little bit.

I guess it’s nice that “its life cycles” has been changed to “the parasite’s life cycles”, but either way, it’s illogical: a singular parasite presumably has only one life cycle, not multiple “life cycles.”

It’s also nice that the subject-verb issue has been fixed (“snails… become”), but I still don’t think it’s ideal to use “which” in this type of scenario without a comma. But again: the GMAT doesn’t generally make a big deal out of comma placement, and it’s almost never a deciding factor.

And even if you ignore the comma thing, the phrase “parasite’s life cycles” is goofy enough to let us eliminate (D).

Quote:
E. parasite's hosts, freshwater snails which become their hosts during their life cycles

The plural pronoun “their” appears twice in (E), but “parasite’s” is actually singular, so “their” presumably refers to “snails.” And that’s garbage: “… freshwater snails which become [the snails’] hosts during [the snails’] life cycles…”

You could also argue that “which” needs to be preceded by a comma, as we mentioned in (C) and (D) – but again, that’s rarely a deciding factor on the GMAT.

The pronoun thing is a big deal, though. (E) is out, and we’re left with (A).


But in option C we have “become” as part of the choice and not “becomes”
There is no other markable difference between A and C other than “that” and “which”. Since the noun immediately preceding “that” is singular I thought of dropping A.

Please explain

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New post 17 Oct 2019, 17:21
Why "which" is wrong here
"Which" in this case is correctly modifying the preceding noun(Snails).
Also why option D is wrong
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Re: Schistosomiasis, a disease caused by a parasitic worm, is prevalent in  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Oct 2019, 07:57
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Quote:
But in option C we have “become” as part of the choice and not “becomes”
There is no other markable difference between A and C other than “that” and “which”. Since the noun immediately preceding “that” is singular I thought of dropping A.

Please explain

Good question! First, when "that" is used as a modifier, it can describe either singular or plural entities. For example: "The shirts that Tim put in the washing machine were all clean, inspiring his daughter to give him a lengthy sermon about the evils of waste and inefficiency." Here, "shirts" is plural and it's correctly modified by "that." This is similar to the usage in (A).

If however, we were using "that" as a pronoun, in that case we'd use "those" to refer to a plural antecedent. For example, "The shirts that Tim put in the washing machine were cleaner than those he'd put in the closet." Now "those" is a stand-in for the plural noun "shirts."

The main difference between (A) and (C) is a subtle meaning issue. Consider the following:

    1) "Tim hates the dogs that try to bite him."

Here, Tim only hates the dogs trying to bite him. Presumably, there are other dogs Tim doesn't hate. The "that" modifier serves to differentiate one group from another. (If you want to use fancy terminology - and you probably shouldn't - this type of modifier is "restrictive." It's necessary to understand what dog group we're talking about.)

Contrast the above with:

    2) "Tim hates dogs, which try to bite him."

Now, Tim seems to hate dogs in general, and a characteristic of all dogs is that they want to maul Tim. ("Which" here is an unrestrictive modifier, meaning that it's just providing incidental information about dogs, not telling us what dogs we're discussing. And while you shouldn't spend much time worrying about comma usage, technically, we use a comma when we're introducing an unrestrictive modifier, such as "which.")

We see the same distinction here.

In (A), we have:

    "...irrigation projects have enlarged the habitat of the freshwater snails that are the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycle."

The meaning here is that the irrigation projects have only enlarged the habitat of the specific snails that are hosts of the parasite. So there are other types of freshwater snails that aren't hosts and whose habitats haven't been enlarged. Makes sense.

In (C) we have:

    "...irrigation projects have enlarged the habitat of freshwater snails which become the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycles."

Now the meaning seems to be that irrigation projects have enlarged the habitat of freshwater snails in general, and all freshwater snails are hosts for the parasite. It's also somewhat illogical to say "its life cycles" -- the parasite somehow has multiple life cycles? (Notice, also, that we're missing a comma before "which." One of the very rare instances when the absence of a comma is definitively wrong.)

It seems more logical to suggest that we're talking about a subset of freshwater snails having its habitat enlarged, as (A) does, than to suppose we're talking about all freshwater snails, as (C) does. (And, again, (C) is missing a necessary comma, and has a problem with a single parasite possessing multiple life cycles.)

I hope that helps!
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Re: Schistosomiasis, a disease caused by a parasitic worm, is prevalent in  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Feb 2020, 23:27
I thought of this question in this way. If my reasoning has any flaws, please correct me.
1) It should be life cycle and not "life cycles". This leaves me with option A and B.

A. the freshwater snails that are the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycle

B. the freshwater snails that are the parasite's hosts in part of their life cycle

" for part of its life cycle " is the better one among "for part of its life cycle " and "in part of their life cycle"
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New post 24 Feb 2020, 04:10
The one thing which came immediately in my mind after scanning the answer choices was the use of "the" because 1st and 2nd choice have "the" in front of them and 3rd and 4th don't have "the".

the definite article "the" is used for definite nouns and it is not used for abstract nouns.
For example,
1. Life is beautiful. and not The life is beautiful.
2. Australia is known for the killer sharks and not Australia is known for killer sharks.

So, right away I can reject 2 choices (C & D) and choose between rest 3.

A. the freshwater snails that are the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycle - I don't find anything wrong in this sentence and its correctly refers to the parasite's
B. the freshwater snails that are the parasite's hosts in part of their life cycle - their can refer to freshwater snails but the preposition in is wrong to denote a period of time. (We generally use for and since to denote a time period)
C. freshwater snails which become the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycles - Rejected because no usage of the
D. freshwater snails which become the hosts of the parasite during the parasite's life cycles - Rejected because no usage of the
E. parasite's hosts, freshwater snails which become their hosts during their life cycles - Use of pronoun their is wrong for parasite's
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New post 01 Mar 2020, 21:57
GMATNinja wrote:
Quote:
A. the freshwater snails that are the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycle

I don’t have a whole lot to say about (A). The first thing I notice is the modifier “that are the parasite’s hosts” – and that seems like a reasonable way to modify “the freshwater snails.”

The pronoun “its” also jumps out at me, and that would have to refer to “the parasite’s”, since that’s our nearest (and most logical) singular. And that’s fine, too: “…the freshwater snails that are the parasite’s hosts for part of [the parasite’s] life cycle…” Reasonable enough.

So I guess we’ll keep (A).

Quote:
B. the freshwater snails that are the parasite's hosts in part of their life cycle

The biggest difference between (B) and (A) is the plural pronoun “their” in (B). And that’s a problem: “their” is plural, so it has to refer to either “the freshwater snails” or “the parasite’s hosts” – and those are the same thing, anyway. So that gives us: “… the freshwater snails that are the parasite’s hosts in part of [the freshwater snails’] life cycle.”

That’s not WRONG, exactly, if you’re willing to assume that the sentence is trying to explain what happens during the snails’ life cycle. But I think that misses the point: schistosomiasis is the grammatical subject of the sentence, and the sentence is clearly trying to explain why the disease has become more common. So presumably, the sentence is interested in explaining that the snails are hosts during part of the parasite’s life cycle. The snail’s life cycle really isn’t of interest to us, and wouldn’t help explain why the parasite has become more common.

So that’s miserably subtle, but it’s basically all we’ve got, unless you want to make an unnecessarily big deal out of the prepositions. (A) is better than (B), so we can eliminate (B).

Quote:
C. freshwater snails which becomes the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycles

(C) is a little bit easier to eliminate than some of the other options. The phrase “its life cycles” really doesn’t make any sense at all: “its” presumably refers to “the parasite”, since that’s the closest (and most logical) singular noun. But then how is that “the parasite” has multiple “life cycles”? As far as I know, each parasite only has one life cycle. If not, that would be creepy AF.

There’s also a problem with the phrase “freshwater snails which becomes.” Snails are plural, so the verb would have to be “become”, not “becomes.” Plus, “which” is generally a non-restrictive modifier, so it usually follows a comma – though that’s not usually a deciding factor on GMAT questions.

So we have lots of reasons to ditch (C).

Quote:
D. freshwater snails which become the hosts of the parasite during the parasite's life cycles

(D) is a little bit better than (C)… but only a little bit.

I guess it’s nice that “its life cycles” has been changed to “the parasite’s life cycles”, but either way, it’s illogical: a singular parasite presumably has only one life cycle, not multiple “life cycles.”

It’s also nice that the subject-verb issue has been fixed (“snails… become”), but I still don’t think it’s ideal to use “which” in this type of scenario without a comma. But again: the GMAT doesn’t generally make a big deal out of comma placement, and it’s almost never a deciding factor.

And even if you ignore the comma thing, the phrase “parasite’s life cycles” is goofy enough to let us eliminate (D).

Quote:
E. parasite's hosts, freshwater snails which become their hosts during their life cycles

The plural pronoun “their” appears twice in (E), but “parasite’s” is actually singular, so “their” presumably refers to “snails.” And that’s garbage: “… freshwater snails which become [the snails’] hosts during [the snails’] life cycles…”

You could also argue that “which” needs to be preceded by a comma, as we mentioned in (C) and (D) – but again, that’s rarely a deciding factor on the GMAT.

The pronoun thing is a big deal, though. (E) is out, and we’re left with (A).


Schistosomiasis, a disease caused by a parasitic worm, is prevalent in hot, humid climates, and it has become more widespread as irrigation projects have enlarged the habitat of the freshwater snails that are the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycle.
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New post 01 Mar 2020, 22:14
Easy one here.

A. the freshwater snails that are the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycle

B. the freshwater snails that are the parasite's hosts in part of their life cycle

possessive noun and possessive pronoun agreement error.

C. freshwater snails which becomes the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycles

rule : which is preceded by a comma.

D. freshwater snails which become the hosts of the parasite during the parasite's life cycles

rule : which is preceded by a comma.

E. parasite's hosts, freshwater snails which become their hosts during their life cycles
Changes the meaning.

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New post 24 Apr 2020, 07:31
GMATNinja wrote:
Quote:
A. the freshwater snails that are the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycle

I don’t have a whole lot to say about (A). The first thing I notice is the modifier “that are the parasite’s hosts” – and that seems like a reasonable way to modify “the freshwater snails.”

The pronoun “its” also jumps out at me, and that would have to refer to “the parasite’s”, since that’s our nearest (and most logical) singular. And that’s fine, too: “…the freshwater snails that are the parasite’s hosts for part of [the parasite’s] life cycle…” Reasonable enough.

So I guess we’ll keep (A).

Quote:
B. the freshwater snails that are the parasite's hosts in part of their life cycle

The biggest difference between (B) and (A) is the plural pronoun “their” in (B). And that’s a problem: “their” is plural, so it has to refer to either “the freshwater snails” or “the parasite’s hosts” – and those are the same thing, anyway. So that gives us: “… the freshwater snails that are the parasite’s hosts in part of [the freshwater snails’] life cycle.”

That’s not WRONG, exactly, if you’re willing to assume that the sentence is trying to explain what happens during the snails’ life cycle. But I think that misses the point: schistosomiasis is the grammatical subject of the sentence, and the sentence is clearly trying to explain why the disease has become more common. So presumably, the sentence is interested in explaining that the snails are hosts during part of the parasite’s life cycle. The snail’s life cycle really isn’t of interest to us, and wouldn’t help explain why the parasite has become more common.

So that’s miserably subtle, but it’s basically all we’ve got, unless you want to make an unnecessarily big deal out of the prepositions. (A) is better than (B), so we can eliminate (B).

Quote:
C. freshwater snails which becomes the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycles

(C) is a little bit easier to eliminate than some of the other options. The phrase “its life cycles” really doesn’t make any sense at all: “its” presumably refers to “the parasite”, since that’s the closest (and most logical) singular noun. But then how is that “the parasite” has multiple “life cycles”? As far as I know, each parasite only has one life cycle. If not, that would be creepy AF.

There’s also a problem with the phrase “freshwater snails which becomes.” Snails are plural, so the verb would have to be “become”, not “becomes.” Plus, “which” is generally a non-restrictive modifier, so it usually follows a comma – though that’s not usually a deciding factor on GMAT questions.

So we have lots of reasons to ditch (C).

Quote:
D. freshwater snails which become the hosts of the parasite during the parasite's life cycles

(D) is a little bit better than (C)… but only a little bit.

I guess it’s nice that “its life cycles” has been changed to “the parasite’s life cycles”, but either way, it’s illogical: a singular parasite presumably has only one life cycle, not multiple “life cycles.”

It’s also nice that the subject-verb issue has been fixed (“snails… become”), but I still don’t think it’s ideal to use “which” in this type of scenario without a comma. But again: the GMAT doesn’t generally make a big deal out of comma placement, and it’s almost never a deciding factor.

And even if you ignore the comma thing, the phrase “parasite’s life cycles” is goofy enough to let us eliminate (D).

Quote:
E. parasite's hosts, freshwater snails which become their hosts during their life cycles

The plural pronoun “their” appears twice in (E), but “parasite’s” is actually singular, so “their” presumably refers to “snails.” And that’s garbage: “… freshwater snails which become [the snails’] hosts during [the snails’] life cycles…”

You could also argue that “which” needs to be preceded by a comma, as we mentioned in (C) and (D) – but again, that’s rarely a deciding factor on the GMAT.

The pronoun thing is a big deal, though. (E) is out, and we’re left with (A).




Does the "which" rule really not matter in GMAT? I would be very concerned if that were the case.

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Re: Schistosomiasis, a disease caused by a parasitic worm, is prevalent in  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2020, 07:56
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sameeb wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
Quote:
A. the freshwater snails that are the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycle

I don’t have a whole lot to say about (A). The first thing I notice is the modifier “that are the parasite’s hosts” – and that seems like a reasonable way to modify “the freshwater snails.”

The pronoun “its” also jumps out at me, and that would have to refer to “the parasite’s”, since that’s our nearest (and most logical) singular. And that’s fine, too: “…the freshwater snails that are the parasite’s hosts for part of [the parasite’s] life cycle…” Reasonable enough.

So I guess we’ll keep (A).

Quote:
B. the freshwater snails that are the parasite's hosts in part of their life cycle

The biggest difference between (B) and (A) is the plural pronoun “their” in (B). And that’s a problem: “their” is plural, so it has to refer to either “the freshwater snails” or “the parasite’s hosts” – and those are the same thing, anyway. So that gives us: “… the freshwater snails that are the parasite’s hosts in part of [the freshwater snails’] life cycle.”

That’s not WRONG, exactly, if you’re willing to assume that the sentence is trying to explain what happens during the snails’ life cycle. But I think that misses the point: schistosomiasis is the grammatical subject of the sentence, and the sentence is clearly trying to explain why the disease has become more common. So presumably, the sentence is interested in explaining that the snails are hosts during part of the parasite’s life cycle. The snail’s life cycle really isn’t of interest to us, and wouldn’t help explain why the parasite has become more common.

So that’s miserably subtle, but it’s basically all we’ve got, unless you want to make an unnecessarily big deal out of the prepositions. (A) is better than (B), so we can eliminate (B).

Quote:
C. freshwater snails which becomes the parasite's hosts for part of its life cycles

(C) is a little bit easier to eliminate than some of the other options. The phrase “its life cycles” really doesn’t make any sense at all: “its” presumably refers to “the parasite”, since that’s the closest (and most logical) singular noun. But then how is that “the parasite” has multiple “life cycles”? As far as I know, each parasite only has one life cycle. If not, that would be creepy AF.

There’s also a problem with the phrase “freshwater snails which becomes.” Snails are plural, so the verb would have to be “become”, not “becomes.” Plus, “which” is generally a non-restrictive modifier, so it usually follows a comma – though that’s not usually a deciding factor on GMAT questions.

So we have lots of reasons to ditch (C).

Quote:
D. freshwater snails which become the hosts of the parasite during the parasite's life cycles

(D) is a little bit better than (C)… but only a little bit.

I guess it’s nice that “its life cycles” has been changed to “the parasite’s life cycles”, but either way, it’s illogical: a singular parasite presumably has only one life cycle, not multiple “life cycles.”

It’s also nice that the subject-verb issue has been fixed (“snails… become”), but I still don’t think it’s ideal to use “which” in this type of scenario without a comma. But again: the GMAT doesn’t generally make a big deal out of comma placement, and it’s almost never a deciding factor.

And even if you ignore the comma thing, the phrase “parasite’s life cycles” is goofy enough to let us eliminate (D).

Quote:
E. parasite's hosts, freshwater snails which become their hosts during their life cycles

The plural pronoun “their” appears twice in (E), but “parasite’s” is actually singular, so “their” presumably refers to “snails.” And that’s garbage: “… freshwater snails which become [the snails’] hosts during [the snails’] life cycles…”

You could also argue that “which” needs to be preceded by a comma, as we mentioned in (C) and (D) – but again, that’s rarely a deciding factor on the GMAT.

The pronoun thing is a big deal, though. (E) is out, and we’re left with (A).




Does the "which" rule really not matter in GMAT? I would be very concerned if that were the case.

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We've posted an article addressing that very question!

Hopefully that helps (especially from "Usage #4" to the end).
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New post 25 Apr 2020, 13:11
Hi! Thank you for your reply. The article is on the usage of "That". Not sure if I am missing something here ?

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New post 25 Apr 2020, 21:54
sameeb wrote:
Does the "which" rule really not matter in GMAT?

Sorry what which rule are you referring to?
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New post 26 Apr 2020, 07:18
EducationAisle wrote:
sameeb wrote:
Does the "which" rule really not matter in GMAT?

Sorry what which rule are you referring to?


GMAT Ninja, while providing a detailed answer, wrote : "...Plus, “which” is generally a non-restrictive modifier, so it usually follows a comma – though that’s not usually a deciding factor on GMAT questions."

My question is - Is that really not a deciding factor on GMAT questions? I mean I would immediately consider an option without a comma with a non-restrictive "which" modifier wrong. Would I be making a mistake?

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New post 26 Apr 2020, 22:41
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sameeb wrote:
My question is - Is that really not a deciding factor on GMAT questions? I mean I would immediately consider an option without a comma with a non-restrictive "which" modifier wrong. Would I be making a mistake?

Hi sameeb, this is just a different perspective.

We continue to suggest that this issue can be used for elimination (a big exception is when which is a part of prepositional phrase).

GMAT Ninja is also correct that till date, we have not come across any official question where this issue is the only split between any two options.
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New post 26 Apr 2020, 23:32
EducationAisle wrote:
sameeb wrote:
My question is - Is that really not a deciding factor on GMAT questions? I mean I would immediately consider an option without a comma with a non-restrictive "which" modifier wrong. Would I be making a mistake?

Hi sameeb, this is just a different perspective.

We continue to suggest that this issue can be used for elimination (a big exception is when which is a part of prepositional phrase).

GMAT Ninja is also correct that till date, we have not come across any official question where this issue is the only split between any two options.



Got it! Thank you! This is very helpful. :)

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Re: Schistosomiasis, a disease caused by a parasitic worm, is prevalent in   [#permalink] 26 Apr 2020, 23:32

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