GMAT Changed on April 16th - Read about the latest changes here

It is currently 26 Apr 2018, 06:33

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Scientist: A small group of islands near Australia is inhabited

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
D
Joined: 17 May 2015
Posts: 225
Scientist: A small group of islands near Australia is inhabited [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Jul 2017, 02:36
1
This post received
KUDOS
4
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

29% (01:50) correct 71% (01:43) wrong based on 257 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Scientist: A small group of islands near Australia is inhabited by several species of iguana; closely related species also exist in the Americas, but nowhere else. The islands in question formed Jong after the fragmentation of Gondwana, the ancient supercontinent that included present-day South America and Australia. Thus, these species' progenitors must have rafted on floating debris across the Pacific Ocean from the Americas.

Which one of the following, if true, most weakens the scientist's argument?

(A) A number of animal species that inhabit the islands are not found in the Americas.

(B) Genetic analysis indicates that the iguana species on the islands are different in several respects from those found in the Americas.

(C) Documented cases of iguanas rafting long distances between land masses are uncommon.

(D) Fossils of iguana species closely related to those that inhabit the islands have been found in Australia.

(E) The lineages of numerous plant and animal species found in Australia or in South America date back to a period prior to the fragmentation of Gondwana.

Source: LSAT PrepTest 80 - December 2016
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
1 KUDOS received
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 24 Oct 2016
Posts: 302
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, International Business
Schools: IIMB
GMAT 1: 550 Q42 V28
GPA: 3.96
WE: Human Resources (Retail Banking)
Re: Scientist: A small group of islands near Australia is inhabited [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Jul 2017, 01:06
1
This post received
KUDOS
this is quite interesting to go through this argument .
see we have said that species of iguana fish inhabit near the islands of australia ,
conclusion : if we re-frame says that these species which currently inhabit near the islands of australia have moved from America that means they earlier inhabited in America , so we need to tell that they had not inhabited in America but in australia .

now go through the options
A. we do not care about other species or animals , wrong
B. A trap, but does not directly address the issue , out
C. irrelevant
D. yes, if fossils of iguana found in australia then these species which live near the islands of Austrlia must have come from australia not from somewhere else like America . so correct
E. totally out of scope talking about other plant and animals .

hence D
hit kudos if you liked my reasoning .
SVP
SVP
avatar
P
Joined: 12 Dec 2016
Posts: 1928
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 700 Q49 V33
GPA: 3.64
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Scientist: A small group of islands near Australia is inhabited [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Sep 2017, 17:51
E talks about lineages => out of scope with A and C.
B does not help.
Only D is left.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 17 Jan 2018
Posts: 38
Re: Scientist: A small group of islands near Australia is inhabited [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Apr 2018, 04:35
Iguana species exist both in South America and a few islands near Australia. So, these species must have rafted from South America to these islands.

Weaken this statement. What if we can show that these species may have come from nearby Australia and not all the way from South America on boats?

A) A number of animal species that inhabit the islands are not found in the Americas.

So? Pfffttt.. Who cares about other animal species? Tell me about iguana. Irrelevant.

(B) Genetic analysis indicates that the iguana species on the islands are different in several respects from those found in the Americas.

Cool.. DNA is different from South American iguana. But, in these millions of years evolution, the DNA may have changed a bit. So, cannot really confirm. Let's keep this option open.

(C) Documented cases of iguanas rafting long distances between land masses are uncommon.

Documented by humans? Sure. But what if something like this happened millions of years ago? Cant really say. Ignore.

(D) Fossils of iguana species closely related to those that inhabit the islands have been found in Australia.

Fossils are related to the ones in Australia. Wait a minute, what if they came from Australia and not South America? :D

(E) The lineages of numerous plant and animal species found in Australia or in South America date back to a period prior to the fragmentation of Gondwana.

OKay, so? They may have common origins? But tell me about iguana please. Reject.

So, it is either B or D.

D shows an alternate place of origin. B is a bit vague and half confirmed.

So, answer is D.

ganand wrote:
Scientist: A small group of islands near Australia is inhabited by several species of iguana; closely related species also exist in the Americas, but nowhere else. The islands in question formed Jong after the fragmentation of Gondwana, the ancient supercontinent that included present-day South America and Australia. Thus, these species' progenitors must have rafted on floating debris across the Pacific Ocean from the Americas.

Which one of the following, if true, most weakens the scientist's argument?

(A) A number of animal species that inhabit the islands are not found in the Americas.

(B) Genetic analysis indicates that the iguana species on the islands are different in several respects from those found in the Americas.

(C) Documented cases of iguanas rafting long distances between land masses are uncommon.

(D) Fossils of iguana species closely related to those that inhabit the islands have been found in Australia.

(E) The lineages of numerous plant and animal species found in Australia or in South America date back to a period prior to the fragmentation of Gondwana.

Source: LSAT PrepTest 80 - December 2016
1 KUDOS received
Director
Director
User avatar
G
Joined: 26 Aug 2016
Posts: 531
Location: India
Concentration: Marketing, Strategy
GMAT 1: 690 Q50 V33
GMAT 2: 700 Q50 V33
GPA: 4
WE: Consulting (Consulting)
Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: Scientist: A small group of islands near Australia is inhabited [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Apr 2018, 01:47
1
This post received
KUDOS
Scientist: A small group of islands near Australia is inhabited by several species of iguana; closely related species also exist in the Americas, but nowhere else. The islands in question formed Jong after the fragmentation of Gondwana, the ancient supercontinent that included present-day South America and Australia. Thus, these species' progenitors (their ancestor's origin) must have rafted on floating debris across the Pacific Ocean from the Americas.

Which one of the following, if true, most weakens the scientist's argument?

(A) A number of animal species that inhabit the islands are not found in the Americas. - Out of the box.

(B) Genetic analysis indicates that the iguana species on the islands are different in several respects from those found in the Americas. - Different in several respects- Yes might the time changed it. This actually strengthens a bit.

(C) Documented cases of iguanas rafting long distances between land masses are uncommon. - Does nothing, documented cases might be uncommon but might be found.

(D) Fossils of iguana species closely related to those that inhabit the islands have been found in Australia. - So they might come from Australia rather than Americas. - ANSWER

(E) The lineages of numerous plant and animal species found in Australia or in South America date back to a period prior to the fragmentation of Gondwana. - Out of the box.
Re: Scientist: A small group of islands near Australia is inhabited   [#permalink] 09 Apr 2018, 01:47
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Scientist: A small group of islands near Australia is inhabited

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


cron

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.