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Stanford MBA calls out the H1B visa system

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Stanford MBA calls out the H1B visa system [#permalink]

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New post 24 Nov 2017, 09:50
Thoughts?

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/23/opinion/immigration-visa-h1b-trump-.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=opinion-c-col-left-region&region=opinion-c-col-left-region&WT.nav=opinion-c-col-left-region

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Six months ago I won the lottery — the H-1B visa processing lottery for skilled foreign workers. I called my thrilled parents and celebrated with friends. I’m from northeastern China and have an M.B.A. from Stanford, and was planning to stay in Silicon Valley to help start a company based on a promising new technology to improve the use of data. I was overjoyed because, historically, being selected in the lottery was a near guarantee that an applicant could remain in this country at least three more years.

But at the end of July, I received the dreaded Request for Further Evidence from immigration authorities. I provided the extra information that United States Citizenship and Immigration Services asked for. In September, I got another request. I complied again. Finally, on Oct. 11, half a year after my celebration, I learned I had been denied a visa.

After earning law degrees in China and at Oxford, after having worked in Hong Kong as a lawyer at a top international firm, after coming to United States three years ago for an M.B.A. and graduating and joining a start-up, I was given just 60 days to leave the country. I have 17 days left.

In the past, it was fairly safe to assume that once you were selected in the lottery, your H-1B petition would be accepted by immigration officials. In 2016, this happened about 87 percent of the time. But things began to change in April when the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Justice announced measures to increase scrutiny of the highly skilled applicants who use the H-1B program, and President Trump signed an executive order calling for federal agencies to suggest reforms to the program.

While it’s unclear exactly what percentage of petitions have been approved so far in 2017, requests for evidence like the ones I received have increased by 44 percent compared with last year, according to immigration statistics, strongly suggesting that more people are being denied than before Mr. Trump took office.

Many of my fellow international students are in situations similar to mine. Some had job offers from companies like Google, Apple and PwC when they learned that their applications had been denied or did not even make it into the lottery. For those whose employers have only United States offices, losing the lottery meant losing jobs and going home, with no real way to use the skills they were on the verge of contributing to the American economy.


Read the rest at NYTIMES.

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Re: Stanford MBA calls out the H1B visa system [#permalink]

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New post 24 Nov 2017, 10:21
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Aaliyah537

The H1B is a lottery system. It doesn't get you the visa immediately after the app gets the lottery. They may check the necessary qualifications, job, etc. But real scrutiny comes after the app is selected in the lottery.

I feel sorry that person didn't get the H1B visa. But it happens to most folks. Since it is limited. And I agree more scrutiny is in place now. But it doesn't mean that a person from Stanford MBA should get the visa for sure.

It is a lottery. It is based on luck. I knew many of friends who did their MBA/MS in the US and got the H1B. They all call it luck. And few did not get it and had to return. No point in feeling bad or crying to blame the system when they were just unlucky. In fact- The system had many loopholes I guess they are fixing it.

Final Thought- The person is unlucky like many other folks, but not all write an opinion in NYTimes. I guess he/she should keep the chin up and stay positive and go to his/her home country to start a new living.
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Stanford MBA calls out the H1B visa system [#permalink]

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New post 24 Nov 2017, 12:12
Gnpth wrote:
Aaliyah537

The H1B is a lottery system. It doesn't get you the visa immediately after the app gets the lottery. They may check the necessary qualifications, job, etc. But real scrutiny comes after the app is selected in the lottery.

I feel sorry that person didn't get the H1B visa. But it happens to most folks. Since it is limited. And I agree more scrutiny is in place now. But it doesn't mean that a person from Stanford MBA should get the visa for sure.

It is a lottery. It is based on luck. I knew many of friends who did their MBA/MS in the US and got the H1B. They all call it luck. And few did not get it and had to return. No point in feeling bad or crying to blame the system when they were just unlucky. In fact- The system had many loopholes I guess they are fixing it.

Final Thought- The person is unlucky like many other folks, but not all write an opinion in NYTimes. I guess he/she should keep the chin up and stay positive and go to his/her home country to start a new living.


I agree with you that she has some options - from the article it sounds like she didn't have to take out any loans and parents helped pay for her degree.

I wonder to what extent foreign applicants know what it means that the H1B system is a lottery. There is a good chance you may not get one after taking out a $100,000 loan.

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Stanford MBA calls out the H1B visa system [#permalink]

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New post 24 Nov 2017, 14:05
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Too many students rely on the fact that they might remain in the US after they finish the studies...it is never guaranteed though.
Most universities do accept international applicants specifically because many write in their apps about how they would "improve the community" where they came from after graduation...

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Stanford MBA calls out the H1B visa system   [#permalink] 24 Nov 2017, 14:05
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