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Studies on criminal rehabilitation, particularly on patterns that occu

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Studies on criminal rehabilitation, particularly on patterns that occu  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Oct 2013, 04:45
1
8
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A
B
C
D
E

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  65% (hard)

Question Stats:

54% (01:38) correct 46% (01:41) wrong based on 472 sessions

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Studies on criminal rehabilitation, particularly on patterns that occur in the parole system, show that criminals convicted of certain violent crimes stand a worse chance of being paroled early than do criminals convicted of non-violent crimes.

a) a worse chance of being paroled early than do criminals
b) a worse chance to be paroled early than are those
c) less likely to be paroled early than those criminals
d) a less likely chance of early parole as criminals
e) a lesser chance for parole early as are those criminals


Please help with detailed explanation. I thought that being is wrong english in GMAT. Here, however the correct answer is A, which has "being" in it!
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Re: Studies on criminal rehabilitation, particularly on patterns that occu  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Oct 2013, 19:09
I understand the issue with being. Though I am no expert, I will try and break it down

B) the correct expression would be Xs stands a better chance than do Ys... Xs stand a better chance than are Ys is incorrect.
C) D) E) distort the meaning by using less likely with the rest of the sentence. They don't sound grammatically correct. Moreover they also have comparison errors.
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Re: Studies on criminal rehabilitation, particularly on patterns that occu  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Nov 2013, 12:53
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1
This is a comparative and in general fuller comparisons are better (as A shows).

In other words, to avoid ambiguity or confusion about what is being compared it is sometimes necessary to add a fuller comparison (ex. He loves the GMAT more than Jane does. Without the 'does' we are not sure whether he loves Jane more than he loves the GMAT or more than Jane loves the GMAT).

B - The 'are' is the wrong verb to be used here- in the original the verb in the first half is 'stand' and to replace that 'stand' we need to used the verb 'to do' (If you do it longform you can figure it out- for example: Does he stand? Yes he does...NOT Yes he is)
C - A less likely what? See the article 'a' before the underlined portion (unless this was an error in itself)? We need a noun for that article.
D - The 'as' is wrong- you would need the 'as...as' formula which would denote a equalizing comparison (he is as likely as she is to win the lotto). But in a comparison with less/more or adjectives + er + 'than' we are comparing, not equating. Very different types of comparison.
E - Same as in D but now the placement of early is a bit awkward as an adjective.
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Re: Studies on criminal rehabilitation, particularly on patterns that occu  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Dec 2015, 18:41
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being is not always wrong.
if used as a noun or in passive construction, it is perfectly fine!

Studies on criminal rehabilitation, particularly on patterns that occur in the parole system, show that criminals convicted of certain violent crimes stand a worse chance of being paroled early than do criminals convicted of non-violent crimes.

ok, so this question tests comparison of two entities.

the entities are:
a)criminals convicted of certain violent crimes
b)criminals convicted of non-violent crimes

a STAND a worse chance than DO b

why do we need do? because the verb is stand, which is in present simple. Thus, we need another verb to make the comparison logical and grammatically correct. The only helping verb we can use is DO.

a) a worse chance of being paroled early than do criminals
looks good.

b) a worse chance to be paroled early than are those
are - not the correct verb.

c) less likely to be paroled early than those criminals
comparison error.
stand less likely to be paroled - very wordy
a stand a worse chance than b.
what is it comparing? a stand worse chance than stand b? or a stand worse chance than do b?
you see the mistake? :)

d) a less likely chance of early parole as criminals
"as" - clearly incorrect.

e) a lesser chance for parole early as are those criminals
lesser - oh no, no, no no!!!
as - again incorrect.
are - as in B - not correct.
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Re: Studies on criminal rehabilitation, particularly on patterns that occu  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Dec 2015, 13:38
We have a comparison between the chance of parole of two types of criminals.

C and D are comparing Chance of parole to other type of criminal. So both are out.
B and E have a parallelism issue-- Stand --- Are, which is incorrect. So B and E are out.

We are left with A which corrects both of the above problems.

kalravaibhav wrote:
Studies on criminal rehabilitation, particularly on patterns that occur in the parole system, show that criminals convicted of certain violent crimes stand a worse chance of being paroled early than do criminals convicted of non-violent crimes.

a) a worse chance of being paroled early than do criminals
b) a worse chance to be paroled early than are those
c) less likely to be paroled early than those criminals
d) a less likely chance of early parole as criminals
e) a lesser chance for parole early as are those criminals


Please help with detailed explanation. I thought that being is wrong english in GMAT. Here, however the correct answer is A, which has "being" in it!
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Re: Studies on criminal rehabilitation, particularly on patterns that occu  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jun 2017, 19:16
Studies on criminal rehabilitation, particularly on patterns that occur in the parole system, show that criminals convicted of certain violent crimes stand a worse chance of being paroled early than do criminals convicted of non-violent crimes.

a) a worse chance of being paroled early than do criminals
b) a worse chance to be paroled early than are those
c) less likely to be paroled early than those criminals
d) a less likely chance of early parole as criminals
e) a lesser chance for parole early as are those criminals
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Re: Studies on criminal rehabilitation, particularly on patterns that occu  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Oct 2018, 23:18
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Re: Studies on criminal rehabilitation, particularly on patterns that occu   [#permalink] 14 Oct 2018, 23:18
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