Summer is Coming! Join the Game of Timers Competition to Win Epic Prizes. Registration is Open. Game starts Mon July 1st.

It is currently 20 Jul 2019, 11:41

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 02 May 2008
Posts: 69
Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Jul 2008, 09:20
26
1
120
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

26% (02:11) correct 74% (02:19) wrong based on 2327 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics


Project CR Butler:Day 33:Critical Reasoning (CR1)


For all CR butler Questions Click Here

Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette smokers switch brands. Yet the manufacturers have been spending an amount equal to 10 percent of their gross receipts on cigarette promotion in magazines. It follows from these figures that inducing cigarette smokers to switch brands did not pay, and that cigarette companies would have been no worse off economically if they had dropped their advertising.

Of the following, the best criticism of the conclusion that inducing cigarette smokers to switch brands did not pay is that the conclusion is based on

(A) computing advertising costs as a percentage of gross receipts, not of overall costs
(B) past patterns of smoking and may not carry over to the future
(C) the assumption that each smoker is loyal to a single brand of cigarettes at any one time
(D) the assumption that each manufacturer produces only one brand of cigarettes
(E) figures for the cigarette industry as a whole and may not hold for a particular company
Most Helpful Expert Reply
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
D
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 9446
Location: Pune, India
Re: Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Jan 2019, 06:02
10
1
3
MamtaKrishnia wrote:

Project CR Butler:Day 33:Critical Reasoning (CR1)


For all CR butler Questions Click Here

Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette smokers switch brands. Yet the manufacturers have been spending an amount equal to 10 percent of their gross receipts on cigarette promotion in magazines. It follows from these figures that inducing cigarette smokers to switch brands did not pay, and that cigarette companies would have been no worse off economically if they had dropped their advertising.

Of the following, the best criticism of the conclusion that inducing cigarette smokers to switch brands did not pay is that the conclusion is based on

(A) computing advertising costs as a percentage of gross receipts, not of overall costs
(B) past patterns of smoking and may not carry over to the future
(C) the assumption that each smoker is loyal to a single brand of cigarettes at any one time
(D) the assumption that each manufacturer produces only one brand of cigarettes
(E) figures for the cigarette industry as a whole and may not hold for a particular company


- every year only 10 percent of smokers switch brands.
- manufacturers spend 10 percent of their gross receipts on cigarette promotion in magazines.

Conclusion: Inducing cigarette smokers to switch brands did not pay, and that cigarette companies would have been no worse off economically if they had dropped their advertising.

The conclusion seems reasonable. The companies spend 10% of gross receipts on marketing but only 10% people in the entire industry switch brands. It seems that so much marketing budget may not have been of much use.

the best criticism of the conclusion is that the conclusion is based on

(A) computing advertising costs as a percentage of gross receipts, not of overall costs

This is not a criticism. The figures could be represented in any terms. They still stay the same.

(B) past patterns of smoking and may not carry over to the future

There is no discussion of future. The conclusion talks about past "... did not pay ... would have been no worse off ..."

(C) the assumption that each smoker is loyal to a single brand of cigarettes at any one time

No such assumption is made. 10% people switch brands even if they are using multiple brands.

(D) the assumption that each manufacturer produces only one brand of cigarettes

No such assumption. A manufacturer could produce multiple brands and advertise for all. Still only 10% people switch brands.

(E) figures for the cigarette industry as a whole and may not hold for a particular company

This says that though the "10% people" figure seems small industry wise, it may be a good number for a company.
Say there are 5 brands (A, B, C..) with each having 20 loyalists for a total of 100 smokers. Say 10 of these 100 switch brands (from B, C, D and E) and come over to A. Now A has 30 loyalists. That is a 50% increase in its customer base. So the 10% marketing budget may have been worth it.

Hence this is the criticism of the conclusion.

Answer (E)
_________________
Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >
Most Helpful Community Reply
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 06 Jan 2008
Posts: 473
Re: Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jul 2008, 07:27
75
7
MamtaKrishnia wrote:
vdhawan1 wrote:
i think E is the correct answer on this one

because it might be possible that the figures ( as in our example) for one company might not reflect the status of the industry


vdhawan1,
The argument says 'manufacturers have been spending' . This means the industry in general not one company.
Also what option E states is
figures for the cigarette industry as a whole and may not hold for a particular company
Which means the concepts that apply to the whole may not always apply to the parts.

This is what confused me too. Because the other way around it makes sense.

In any case OA is E.
But i still understand why :(


Paraphrasing the argument:
Inspite of spending large amounts of money, only 10% switched brands. (in the entire industry)
So, why to spend so much money when you see only 10% results?

Sounds reasonable. But there is a problem.

Lets say the entire smoking industry consists of 2 companies A and B with 50 customers each.
And each company spends money to make customers switch the brand.
So total industry smokers = 100.

After 1 year, lets say 10 smokers from A switched to B.
So, A = 40, B = 60. So we can say in the entire industry, 10 % swithced the brand.
BUT, lets see what B's CEO thinks. TO him, the increase is 20%. ( last year = 50, this year = 60, percentage of increase = 20).
And if you tell him "why to spend so much money when you see only 10% results?" he will not accept it.Because he is seeing good results.
But at the same time, A's CEO may accept the above statement.

So now, the fact(10% swithched brands) which is true to the entire industry is NOT true to the company B. (due to +ve change)

And thats exactly what option E is saying.
nice question. +1 to you.
General Discussion
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 25 Nov 2006
Posts: 201
Re: Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jul 2008, 06:36
9
2
MamtaKrishnia wrote:
vdhawan1 wrote:
i think E is the correct answer on this one

because it might be possible that the figures ( as in our example) for one company might not reflect the status of the industry


vdhawan1,
The argument says 'manufacturers have been spending' . This means the industry in general not one company.
Also what option E states is
figures for the cigarette industry as a whole and may not hold for a particular company
Which means the concepts that apply to the whole may not always apply to the parts.

This is what confused me too. Because the other way around it makes sense.

In any case OA is E.
But i still understand why :(


Let me try and explain this to you.

Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette smokers switch brands. Yet the manufacturers have been spending an amount equal to 10 percent of their gross receipts on cigarette promotion in magazines. It follows from these figures that inducing cigarette smokers to switch brands did not pay, and that cigarette companies would have been no worse off economically if they had dropped their advertising.

Of the following, the best criticism of the conclusion that inducing cigarette smokers to switch brands did not pay is that the conclusion is based on
(A) computing advertising costs as a percentage of gross receipts, not of overall costs
(B) past patterns of smoking and may not carry over to the future
(C) the assumption that each smoker is loyal to a single brand of cigarettes at any one time
(D) the assumption that each manufacturer produces only one brand of cigarettes
(E) figures for the cigarette industry as a whole and may not hold for a particular company

Break this down.

Conclusion : Inducing cigarette smokers to switch brands did not pay dividends.

Evidence 1 : Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette smokers switch brands.
Evidence 2 : Cigarette companies would have been no worse off economically if they had dropped their advertising.

What really links the evidence to the conclusion?

1. That the surveys are accurate and that they can be generalised.
2. The companies sales are dependent on the survey(no matter what the company does).

What can turn this around??

Option 1 : Surveys are not accurate
Option 2: Companies sales are not dependent on the survey and they can influence customers to change brands by different strategies.

Option 1 is not there in the answer choices
Option 2 is what E talks about...hence E.

C was close (if 'at any one time' was not present in the answer choice), what it does is weakens what the survey tries to prove, and thus strengthens option 1.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 02 Feb 2018
Posts: 3
Re: Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Mar 2018, 12:35
Hi.. can you please help me with eliminating option c?
Board of Directors
User avatar
V
Status: Stepping into my 10 years long dream
Joined: 18 Jul 2015
Posts: 3625
Reviews Badge
Re: Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Mar 2018, 04:57
1
anujsp wrote:
Hi.. can you please help me with eliminating option c?


Hey anujsp ,

C is very easy to rule out.

We are already given than 10% of the customers are still switching brands. That means atleast some were there who switched.

But C is saying each smoker was loyal. Isn't that breaking the premise?

Hence, C is wrong.

Does that make sense?
_________________
My GMAT Story: From V21 to V40
My MBA Journey: My 10 years long MBA Dream
My Secret Hacks: Best way to use GMATClub | Importance of an Error Log!
Verbal Resources: All SC Resources at one place | All CR Resources at one place
Blog: Subscribe to Question of the Day Blog
GMAT Club Inbuilt Error Log Functionality - View More.
New Visa Forum - Ask all your Visa Related Questions - here.
New! Best Reply Functionality on GMAT Club!
Find a bug in the new email templates and get rewarded with 2 weeks of GMATClub Tests for free
Check our new About Us Page here.
Senior PS Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: It always seems impossible until it's done.
Joined: 16 Sep 2016
Posts: 751
GMAT 1: 740 Q50 V40
GMAT 2: 770 Q51 V42
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Mar 2018, 05:52
abhimahna wrote:
anujsp wrote:
Hi.. can you please help me with eliminating option c?


Hey anujsp ,

C is very easy to rule out.

We are already given than 10% of the customers are still switching brands. That means atleast some were there who switched.

But C is saying each smoker was loyal. Isn't that breaking the premise?

Hence, C is wrong.

Does that make sense?


I think we rule out C more so by the fact that it helps strengthen the conclusion rather than weaken it as is the question prompt. Even though you are correct in pointing out that each smoker is not loyal to one brand due to the fact that 10% are changing it.

E was harder to digest as OA.

Is it only by the virtue of " bad among the worst " that E ends up weakening the conclusion?
_________________
Regards,
Gladi



“Do. Or do not. There is no try.” - Yoda (The Empire Strikes Back)
Board of Directors
User avatar
V
Status: Stepping into my 10 years long dream
Joined: 18 Jul 2015
Posts: 3625
Reviews Badge
Re: Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Mar 2018, 06:27
Gladiator59 wrote:
I think we rule out C more so by the fact that it helps strengthen the conclusion rather than weaken it as is the question prompt. Even though you are correct in pointing out that each smoker is not loyal to one brand due to the fact that 10% are changing it.

E was harder to digest as OA.

Is it only by the virtue of " bad among the worst " that E ends up weakening the conclusion?


Hey Gladiator59 ,

I would never jump to the conclusion if I see there is any thing that is breaking the premise. This is strictly not allowed. The moment I see each person is disloyal in option C while 10% disloyal in the premise, I will reject C without a second thought.

E very well explains the weakner. It says it may happen that the survey is for the entire industry while concluding the same thing for each of the cigarette company shouldn't be a good idea.

Does that make sense?
_________________
My GMAT Story: From V21 to V40
My MBA Journey: My 10 years long MBA Dream
My Secret Hacks: Best way to use GMATClub | Importance of an Error Log!
Verbal Resources: All SC Resources at one place | All CR Resources at one place
Blog: Subscribe to Question of the Day Blog
GMAT Club Inbuilt Error Log Functionality - View More.
New Visa Forum - Ask all your Visa Related Questions - here.
New! Best Reply Functionality on GMAT Club!
Find a bug in the new email templates and get rewarded with 2 weeks of GMATClub Tests for free
Check our new About Us Page here.
Senior PS Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: It always seems impossible until it's done.
Joined: 16 Sep 2016
Posts: 751
GMAT 1: 740 Q50 V40
GMAT 2: 770 Q51 V42
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Mar 2018, 06:32
abhimahna wrote:
Gladiator59 wrote:
I think we rule out C more so by the fact that it helps strengthen the conclusion rather than weaken it as is the question prompt. Even though you are correct in pointing out that each smoker is not loyal to one brand due to the fact that 10% are changing it.

E was harder to digest as OA.

Is it only by the virtue of " bad among the worst " that E ends up weakening the conclusion?


Hey Gladiator59 ,

I would never jump to the conclusion if I see there is any thing that is breaking the premise. This is strictly not allowed. The moment I see each person is disloyal in option C while 10% disloyal in the premise, I will reject C without a second thought.

E very well explains the weakner. It says it may happen that the survey is for the entire industry while concluding the same thing for each of the cigarette company shouldn't be a good idea.

Does that make sense?


Hi abhimahna, thanks for writing back.

I realized how E fits in perfectly by reading other answers again.

Also, I get the point you are trying to make. Any option which breaks premise has to be discarded.

Best,
Gladi
_________________
Regards,
Gladi



“Do. Or do not. There is no try.” - Yoda (The Empire Strikes Back)
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 02 Feb 2018
Posts: 3
Re: Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Mar 2018, 08:54
Thanks Abhimahna.. maybe I overthought this one!
Retired Moderator
User avatar
V
Joined: 28 Mar 2017
Posts: 1212
Location: India
GMAT 1: 730 Q49 V41
GPA: 4
Re: Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Mar 2018, 01:57
1
Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette smokers switch brands. Yet the manufacturers have been spending an amount equal to 10 percent of their gross receipts on cigarette promotion in magazines. It follows from these figures that inducing cigarette smokers to switch brands did not pay, and that cigarette companies would have been no worse off economically if they had dropped their advertising.

Of the following, the best criticism of the conclusion that inducing cigarette smokers to switch brands did not pay is that the conclusion is based on

(A) computing advertising costs as a percentage of gross receipts, not of overall costs --Cost is a cost that the company incurs
(B) past patterns of smoking and may not carry over to the future --The argument doesn't compare future/past patters
(C) the assumption that each smoker is loyal to a single brand of cigarettes at any one time --This doesn't help us in reaching at the conclusion
(D) the assumption that each manufacturer produces only one brand of cigarettes --This doesn't help us in reaching at the conclusion
(E) figures for the cigarette industry as a whole and may not hold for a particular company --Correct. The argument is wrongly comparing 10% figure of ALL the companies and the reaching a conclusion specific to one company
_________________
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 12 Jul 2017
Posts: 185
GMAT 1: 570 Q43 V26
GMAT 2: 660 Q48 V34
CAT Tests
Re: Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Nov 2018, 07:29
How to neglect option A?
Here what I perceived:
"and that cigarette companies would have been no worse off economically if they had dropped their advertising."
This is the conclusion we have to weaken.
It says that economically they are weak because of advertising. What if the gross is still proper?
Option a says that

computing advertising costs as a percentage of gross receipts, not of overall costs

So just based on advertising costs we can't say that advertising costs economlically to the company

Please let me know where I was wrong..

Posted from my mobile device
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
P
Joined: 27 Dec 2016
Posts: 332
CAT Tests
Re: Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Dec 2018, 15:13
Could someone please explain why option D is incorrect?
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 22 Sep 2018
Posts: 249
Re: Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Jan 2019, 12:24
MamtaKrishnia wrote:

Project CR Butler:Day 33:Critical Reasoning (CR1)


For all CR butler Questions Click Here

Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette smokers switch brands. Yet the manufacturers have been spending an amount equal to 10 percent of their gross receipts on cigarette promotion in magazines. It follows from these figures that inducing cigarette smokers to switch brands did not pay, and that cigarette companies would have been no worse off economically if they had dropped their advertising.

Of the following, the best criticism of the conclusion that inducing cigarette smokers to switch brands did not pay is that the conclusion is based on

(A) computing advertising costs as a percentage of gross receipts, not of overall costs
(B) past patterns of smoking and may not carry over to the future
(C) the assumption that each smoker is loyal to a single brand of cigarettes at any one time
(D) the assumption that each manufacturer produces only one brand of cigarettes
(E) figures for the cigarette industry as a whole and may not hold for a particular company


To be honest this question is challenging because B, C, and E all present criticisms of the conclusion. If someone can share insight into why D is better than B and C, I'd love to know
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 12 Dec 2017
Posts: 79
Location: India
Schools: Yale '19, GMBA '20, XLRI
GMAT 1: 660 Q46 V35
GPA: 3.8
Re: Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Jan 2019, 05:26
kchen1994 wrote:
MamtaKrishnia wrote:

Project CR Butler:Day 33:Critical Reasoning (CR1)


For all CR butler Questions Click Here



To be honest this question is challenging because B, C, and E all present criticisms of the conclusion. If someone can share insight into why D is better than B and C, I'd love to know


Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette smokers switch brands. Yet the manufacturers have been spending an amount equal to 10 percent of their gross receipts on cigarette promotion in magazines.
CONCLUSION : It follows from these figures that inducing cigarette smokers to switch brands did not pay[/b], and that cigarette [b]companies would have been no worse off economically if they had dropped their advertising.

Of the following, the best criticism of the conclusion that inducing cigarette smokers to switch brands did not pay is that the conclusion is based on

(A) computing advertising costs as a percentage of gross receipts, not of overall costs.
INCORRECT: overall costs are irrelevant when it clearly stated as a percent of some other components. It would have been relevant if the conclusion would have mentioned overall costs as a base.

(B) past patterns of smoking and may not carry over to the future.
INCORRECT: if we look at the conclusion, it is still based on the evaluation of past results. "companies would have been no worse off economically if they had dropped their advertising."
There is no link to the future. The argument is not basing any prediction or future claim on the basis of the past patterns. It is evaluating the past results on basis of past actions of the companies.

(C) the assumption that each smoker is loyal to a single brand of cigarettes at any one time.
INCORRECT. This clearly is not the assumption let alone a loophole. it is explicitly mentioned that 10% of people did switch. So "each" rules out this option.

(D) the assumption that each manufacturer produces only one brand of cigarettes
INCORRECT.
If we negate the conclusion, this answer choice does not support the negated conclusion.
Strategy for weakening: negate the conclusion and look for supporting the negated conclusion - inducing smokers to switch brands paid off.
one brand of cigarettes doesn't really contribute.

(E) figures for the cigarette industry as a whole and may not hold for a particular company
CORRECT. Now there we have a major discrepancy pointed out. 10% of all smokers versus at least one company that could have benefitted.
This supports the negated conclusion that inducing smokers did pay off.


PLEASE KUDOS IF THIS HELPS :D
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 27 Oct 2018
Posts: 46
GMAT 1: 750 Q49 V42
GPA: 3.9
Reviews Badge
Re: Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Feb 2019, 03:15
C, I can see is definitely wrong. If each smoker only ever smokes one brand at any given time, then getting those 10% to switch brands will actually be very good for the company. It doesn’t matter if they only smoke on brand at a time, because we know that 10% do switch every year. In fact, this only strengthens the argument, since it cleanly breaks the smokers into distinct groups which in turn makes the statistics on them switching groups much clearer.



Looking at the rest, E is the right option. The conclusion is that spending money to convince smokers to switch brands did not pay off.

The evidence presented in favor of this conclusion is that only 10% of smokers switch brands every year and that dropping advertising efforts would not negatively effect the cigarette companies, economically. This conclusion relies on two assumptions, that these surveys are accurate and that the sales for any particular company are dependent on the information presented in the surveys.



E refutes the second assumption, stating that while these figures might reflect true for the industry as whole, they do not necessarily apply to each company.



None of the other options address these two assumptions, so E is the best answer.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 03 Dec 2018
Posts: 3
Re: Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Mar 2019, 18:24
What if an option meaning is not clear & understanding the meaning takes much time?Is practicing is the only solution.?
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
D
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2676
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Mar 2019, 06:30
bn1 wrote:
What if an option meaning is not clear & understanding the meaning takes much time?Is practicing is the only solution.?

Hi bn1, unfortunately there is no short, easy answer to your question, but check out our CR Guide for Beginners and see if that helps.
_________________
GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (we're hiring!) | GMAT Club Verbal Expert | Instagram | Blog | Bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal: RC | CR | SC

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars: Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations: All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply? Hit the request verbal experts' reply button; be specific about your question, and tag @GMATNinja. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

SC articles & resources: How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

RC, CR, and other articles & resources: All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 07 Mar 2019
Posts: 34
Re: Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 May 2019, 08:16
Why is C wrong?
There could be a possibility that cigarette smokers start smoking new brands without really switching from their bold.
They started smoking cigarettes of 2 brands instead of just 1.
Target Test Prep Representative
User avatar
P
Status: Chief Curriculum and Content Architect
Affiliations: Target Test Prep
Joined: 24 Nov 2014
Posts: 556
GMAT 1: 800 Q51 V51
Re: Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 May 2019, 09:22
1
PriyankaWadhwa wrote:
Why is C wrong?
There could be a possibility that cigarette smokers start smoking new brands without really switching from their bold.
They started smoking cigarettes of 2 brands instead of just 1.

I guess one could argue that a smoker who starts smoking two brands rather than one has switched to smoking the second brand at least some of the time, unless that smoker has started smoking cigarettes two at a time, an unlikely scenario.

In that case, the part time switch could be included in the 10 percent who switched.

Overall, while your logic makes some sense, probably it wouldn't constitute support for a GMAT CR correct answer, because it involves two "what if,"s: "what if someone starts smoking two brands rather than one" and "what if we don't consider that action a switch."
_________________

Marty Murray

Chief Curriculum and Content Architect

Marty@targettestprep.com
TTP - Target Test Prep Logo
122 Reviews

5-star rated online GMAT quant
self study course

See why Target Test Prep is the top rated GMAT quant course on GMAT Club. Read Our Reviews

If you find one of my posts helpful, please take a moment to click on the "Kudos" button.

GMAT Club Bot
Re: Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette   [#permalink] 11 May 2019, 09:22

Go to page    1   2    Next  [ 21 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Surveys show that every year only 10 percent of cigarette

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne