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Targeted toward the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television

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Targeted toward the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television  [#permalink]

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Targeted toward the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas feature attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities.


A. Targeted toward the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas feature attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities.

B. Targeted at the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas features attractive, bankable stars from both the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities.

C. Targeted at the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas features attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their abilities as actors.

D. Targeted to the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas feature attractive, bankable stars from both the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their abilities as actors.

E. Targeted to the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas features attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities.


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Originally posted by souvik101990 on 29 May 2017, 08:03.
Last edited by Bunuel on 16 Oct 2018, 03:37, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: Targeted toward the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television  [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2017, 08:06
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I don’t think this is a particularly difficult question, and if you’re doing it the right way, it’s a really quick and painless question. But there are some speedbumps here if you’re not focused on the right issues.

The semi-trap in this question: if you’re distracted by the idiom, you’re missing the point. In real life, I don’t know anybody – including any of my friends who are native English speakers and/or professional editors – who knows or cares whether the correct idiom is “targeted toward”, “targeted to”, “targeted at”, or “targeted on.” It’s a dumb thing for the GMAT to test, in my opinion. But the GMAT doesn't care what I think. :)

More importantly: if you see an idiom split and you’re not 100% sure what the right idiom is, look for other stuff. Sure, sometimes there’s no way to escape the idiom. But if they give you an opportunity to “work around” the idiom, please take it. (More on idioms -- and why they might not be worth studying -- in this article.)

And there’s another potential distraction here: the word “their” looks ambiguous, since it could refer to “industries” or “stars” – and since “industries” is the most recent plural noun, the pronoun doesn’t look ideal. But pronoun ambiguity isn’t ALWAYS wrong on the GMAT: click here for an old thread on this topic, click here for an official example of acceptable pronoun ambiguity -- and we also covered this issue in a YouTube video.

And in this situation, the pronoun is irrelevant, anyway: “their” appears in all five answer choices, in exactly the same place.

Bottom line: if you didn’t get sidetracked by the pronouns or idiom, you win.
Quote:
A. Targeted toward the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas feature attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities.

“Each” is singular, so “each… feature” is wrong. Plus, “both from… and modeling” is not parallel. We don’t even need to think about the idiom or the pronouns. Eliminate (A).

Quote:
B. Targeted at the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas features attractive, bankable stars from both the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities.

Both the parallelism and subject-verb agreement look good here. Let’s keep (B).

Quote:
C. Targeted at the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas features attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their abilities as actors.

Subject-verb is fine here, but the parallelism error is the same as in (A). We can still ignore the idiom and the pronouns. Eliminate (C).

Quote:
D. Targeted to the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas feature attractive, bankable stars from both the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their abilities as actors.

The parallelism is acceptable here, but “each… feature” doesn’t work. And we still have no reason to worry about the idiom. (D) is gone.

Quote:
E. Targeted to the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas features attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities.

Parallelism error again, so (E) is gone, and (B) is our winner.
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Re: Targeted toward the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television  [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2017, 08:25
Question : Targeted toward the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas feature attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities.



The subject of the main clause - each of the television network’s new scripted dramas --> is singular because of the presence of keyword - 'each'. So we need a singular verb - features.

Looking at the idiom, both X and Y - X and Y need to be parallel -

Targeted at - seems idiomatic as it conveys the meaning aptly - the intended audience

Analyzing each option: -




A. Targeted toward the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas feature attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities.
- Subject Verb agreement error and idiom error.

B. Targeted at the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas features attractive, bankable stars from both the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities.

Corrects both the errors from option A.


C. Targeted at the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas features attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their abilities as actors.

idiom error in C - from the music is not || to modelling industries

D. Targeted to the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas feature attractive, bankable stars from both the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their abilities as actors.

Subject- Verb agreement error



E. Targeted to the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas features attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities.

idiom error in C - from the music is not || to modelling industries



Choice B seems correct -
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Re: Targeted toward the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television  [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2017, 10:39
Targeted toward the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas feature attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities.

A. Targeted toward the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas feature attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities. ---each of the is singular so verb should be features. Eliminate this option
B. Targeted at the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas features attractive, bankable stars from both the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities.--S-V are in agreement. Idiom Both-And is correct.
C. Targeted at the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas features attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their abilities as actors. --Sentence uses Both from X and Y. Idiom should be Both from X and from Y.
D. Targeted to the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas feature attractive, bankable stars from both the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their abilities as actors. --- Same as A. Eliminate this option.
E. Targeted to the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas features attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities.--- wrong usage of idiom. Sentence uses Both from X and Y. Idiom should be Both from X and from Y


I go for option B
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Re: Targeted toward the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jun 2018, 00:59
GMATNinja wrote:
I don’t think this is a particularly difficult question, and if you’re doing it the right way, it’s a really quick and painless question. But there are some speedbumps here if you’re not focused on the right issues.

The semi-trap in this question: if you’re distracted by the idiom, you’re missing the point. In real life, I don’t know anybody – including any of my friends who are native English speakers and/or professional editors – who knows or cares whether the correct idiom is “targeted toward”, “targeted to”, “targeted at”, or “targeted on.” It’s a dumb thing for the GMAT to test, in my opinion. But the GMAT doesn't care what I think. :)

More importantly: if you see an idiom split and you’re not 100% sure what the right idiom is, look for other stuff. Sure, sometimes there’s no way to escape the idiom. But if they give you an opportunity to “work around” the idiom, please take it. (More on idioms -- and why they might not be worth studying -- in this article.)

And there’s another potential distraction here: the word “their” looks ambiguous, since it could refer to “industries” or “stars” – and since “industries” is the most recent plural noun, the pronoun doesn’t look ideal. But pronoun ambiguity isn’t ALWAYS wrong on the GMAT: click here for an old thread on this topic, click here for an official example of acceptable pronoun ambiguity -- and we also covered this issue in a YouTube video.

And in this situation, the pronoun is irrelevant, anyway: “their” appears in all five answer choices, in exactly the same place.

Bottom line: if you didn’t get sidetracked by the pronouns or idiom, you win.
Quote:
A. Targeted toward the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas feature attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities.

“Each” is singular, so “each… feature” is wrong. Plus, “both from… and modeling” is not parallel. We don’t even need to think about the idiom or the pronouns. Eliminate (A).

Quote:
B. Targeted at the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas features attractive, bankable stars from both the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities.

Both the parallelism and subject-verb agreement look good here. Let’s keep (B).

Quote:
C. Targeted at the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas features attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their abilities as actors.

Subject-verb is fine here, but the parallelism error is the same as in (A). We can still ignore the idiom and the pronouns. Eliminate (C).

Quote:
D. Targeted to the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas feature attractive, bankable stars from both the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their abilities as actors.

The parallelism is acceptable here, but “each… feature” doesn’t work. And we still have no reason to worry about the idiom. (D) is gone.

Quote:
E. Targeted to the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas features attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities.

Parallelism error again, so (E) is gone, and (B) is our winner.


Hi GMATNinja

I have one small query.
Can you please enlightened me that -> what is their in the line "known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities" is pointing to?
although every option is same in this aspect, but just for my clarity i would like to know why we don't have an ambiguity as their can point to starts as well as industries........
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Re: Targeted toward the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television  [#permalink]

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pratik521992 wrote:
Hi GMATNinja

I have one small query.
Can you please enlightened me that -> what is their in the line "known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities" is pointing to?
although every option is same in this aspect, but just for my clarity i would like to know why we don't have an ambiguity as their can point to starts as well as industries........

The important thing to keep in mind is that pronoun ambiguity isn't an absolute rule on the GMAT. (More on that in this video.) Sure, if the ONLY difference between two answer choices is that one has an ambiguous pronoun and the other does not, then you'd obviously prefer the answer choice without pronoun ambiguity. But in plenty of official questions, the correct answer might technically have some pronoun ambiguity -- it's just that the other answer choices would have WORSE errors in that scenario.

In this particular question, the pronouns are the same in all answer choices, so they're an absolute non-issue.

I hope this helps!
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Re: Targeted toward the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television  [#permalink]

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'Their' is no issue at all about ambiguity between the stars and industries since we expect neither good looks nor acting abilities from the industries.
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Re: Targeted toward the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jun 2018, 05:47
Targeted toward the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas feature attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities.

A. Targeted toward the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas feature attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities.
B. Targeted at the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas features attractive, bankable stars from both the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities. --> correct
C. Targeted at the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas features attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their abilities as actors.
D. Targeted to the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas feature attractive, bankable stars from both the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their abilities as actors.
E. Targeted to the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television network’s new scripted dramas features attractive, bankable stars both from the music and modeling industries, known more for their good looks than for their acting abilities.
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Re: Targeted toward the crucial 18-49 demographic, each of the television &nbs [#permalink] 28 Jun 2018, 05:47
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