GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 19 Sep 2018, 19:54

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jul 2015
Posts: 16
Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Jul 2015, 08:19
I still don't get the rule. Could someone please explain when to use "claim to be" and when to use "claim is"?
I am pretty sure I have heard sentences like "She claims to be the king's daughter", and cannot understand on what context it becomes "claims is the king's daughter".
Director
Director
User avatar
G
Joined: 27 Mar 2010
Posts: 991
Location: Bangalore, India
Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Mar 2016, 10:29
1
Choosing/ignoring the options on the basis of is/to be might not be the best way to approach.

A says:

The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, and it weighs less than 11 ounces.

What does that in that of a handheld computer refer to? Well, length seems to be the best antecedent. So, A reads:

The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is length of a handheld computer, and it weighs less than 11 ounces.

Now this is strange: How can length of SNDC be the length of a handheld computer? That doesn't make sense.

More logically, length of SNDC can be the same as length of a handheld computer.
_________________

Thanks,
Ashish
EducationAisle, Bangalore

Sentence Correction Nirvana available on Amazon.in and Flipkart

Now! Preview the entire Grammar Section of Sentence Correction Nirvana at pothi.com

Retired Moderator
User avatar
G
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 3126
Location: Germany
Schools: HHL Leipzig
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Mar 2016, 20:32
1
jameswangmz wrote:
JarvisR wrote:
The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, and it weighs less than 11 ounces.

Intended meaning:
The electronics company has unveiled SNDC.
SNDC is the world’s smallest network digital camcorder.
SNDC is as long as a handheld computer and weighs less than 11 ounces.

A. to be the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, and it weighs
>>Distorts the intended meaning; it weighs is made || to main clause.
B. to be the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, which is as long as a handheld computer, weighing
>>Distorts the intended meaning as per coma + ing rule.
C. is the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, which is as long as a handheld computer, and it weighs
>>Same as A
D. is the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, which is as long as a handheld computer and weighs
E. is the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, weighing
>>Same as B.


Claim to be Vs Claim is: [Courtesy MGMAT]
Quote:
"claim to be" is only used when the person making the claim is talking about him/herself.
my five-year-old brother james claims to be the principal conductor of the boston symphony orchestra --> correct, because james is talking about himself.
X claims to be Y (and variations)
Laney claims to be an expert snowboarder.
Dr. Smith claims to be the inventor of the widget.
Company X claims to have been first to market.

X claims Z is Y (and variations)
Leo claims vanilla is the best ice cream flavor.
Vanilla is the ice cream flavor Leo claims is best.
Lydia claims the rumor is untrue.


I strongly agree your explanation of A.

Ambiguity alone is hardly a problem for GMAT SC problems, as far as the antecedent exists and sing./pl. is right. IMO the parallel in A between "The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s smallest network digital camcorder" and "it weighs less than 11 ounces" doesn't make any sense logically.


A thumb-rule in GMAT:

In a sentence, all it / its MUST refer to the same singular ancedent, and all they / them / their MUST refer to the same plural ancedent.

In option A, the pronoun it is used in two places - the first refers to the electronics company, the second refers to either SNDC or handheld computer. It does not matter which of the two possible antecedents the second it refers to since in either case the usage would be wrong because the first it has already been used to refer to a different antecedent (company).
Retired Moderator
User avatar
G
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 3126
Location: Germany
Schools: HHL Leipzig
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Jun 2016, 01:17
1
2
narendran1990 wrote:
Can anybody let me know as to why 'claims to be' shouldn't be used.? Is it because 'claim' is a reporting verb.?


Although "claims to be" is a valid idomatic usage, in this case the usage is not correct.

He claims to be able to predict future.
I claim to be innocent.

"Able" / "innocent" is what he is claiming to be. The claim "being able" / "being innocent" refers to back to himself.

In the subject question, the "the world’s smallest network digital camcorder" does not refer back to the entity who claims it, i.e. "the electronics company". Such usage is incorrect.
Current Student
User avatar
Joined: 18 Oct 2014
Posts: 874
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 660 Q49 V31
GPA: 3.98
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Jul 2016, 07:01
tarek99 wrote:
The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, and it weighs less than 11 ounces.

A. to be the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, and it weighs
B. to be the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, which is as long as a handheld computer, weighing
C. is the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, which is as long as a handheld computer, and it weighs
D. is the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, which is as long as a handheld computer and weighs
E. is the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, weighing




Please explain your answer!
Thanks!


A. to be the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that (length) of a handheld computer, and it weighs. It must say that the length of which is equal to the length of handheld computer.
B. to be the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, which is as long as a handheld computer, weighing 'which' refers to 'world'
C. is the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, which is as long as a handheld computer, and it weighs 'which' refers to 'world'
D. is the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, which is as long as a handheld computer and weighs 'which' correctly modifies 'camcorder'
E. is the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, weighing It must say that the length of which is equal to the length of handheld computer.
_________________

I welcome critical analysis of my post!! That will help me reach 700+

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 22 Dec 2015
Posts: 3
Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Aug 2016, 01:12
The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, and it weighs less than 11 ounces.
(IM: the Elec Co. has unveiled a network digi cam corder, and claims this product to be the smallest in the world with length of a handheld comp and weight less than 11 ounces)

A. to be the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, and it weighs
(it- refers company, it claims to be smallest, against the IM above )

B. to be the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, which is as long as a handheld computer, weighing
(like A- so eliminate. )

C. is the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, which is as long as a handheld computer, and it weighs

D. is the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, which is as long as a handheld computer and weighs

E. is the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, weighing
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 18 Jun 2016
Posts: 268
Location: India
GMAT 1: 720 Q50 V38
GMAT 2: 750 Q49 V42
GPA: 4
WE: General Management (Other)
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Sep 2016, 06:37
prasannar wrote:
The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, and it weighs less than 11 ounces.

A. to be the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, and it weighs

1. Claims to be - Wrong as mentioned by sayantanc2k in the post above.
2. the length of which is that of - Wordy. Can be concisely edited to - which is as long as...

B. to be the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, which is as long as a handheld computer, weighing

1. Claims to be - Wrong as mentioned by sayantanc2k in the post above.
2. , which - Correctly Modifying - digital camcorder -> to be the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, which is as long as - because in the world is a participle phrase hence , which can jump over it.
3. weighing - Wrongly modifying the world -> the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, which is as long as a handheld computer, weighing - which is a non-essential modifier and removing it brings weighing next to the world and participles modify the nouns they touch.

C. is the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, which is as long as a handheld computer, and it weighs
it - Pronoun Ambiguity. it could refer to network digital camcorder or the world and maybe to handheld computer as well. (I am not sure about handheld computer)

D. is the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, which is as long as a handheld computer and weighs
Correct

E. is the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, weighing
the length of which is that of - Wordy - Can be concisely edited to - which is as long as...
_________________

I'd appreciate learning about the grammatical errors in my posts

Please hit Kudos If my Solution helps

My Debrief for 750 - https://gmatclub.com/forum/from-720-to-750-one-of-the-most-difficult-pleatues-to-overcome-246420.html

My CR notes - https://gmatclub.com/forum/patterns-in-cr-questions-243450.html

Intern
Intern
avatar
S
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 28
WE: Business Development (Internet and New Media)
Reviews Badge
Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Nov 2016, 08:52
daagh wrote:
Stelle wrote

Quote:
I still don't get the rule. Could someone please explain when to use "claim to be" and when to use "claim is"?
I am pretty sure I have heard sentences like "She claims to be the king's daughter", and cannot understand on what context it becomes "claims is the king's daughter".


The answer lies how confident the company is about the claim; if the company feels very confident, then it can forthrightly declare that ‘it claims is’. On the contrary, if it is a little hesitant, then it might say that ‘it claims to be’; however both expressions are correct in their own right. Only thing, in the current context, ‘claims is’ more appropriate since the company is quite in candid its claim.





Sir the information you presented above is quite an eye opener. but i would like to draw your attention to the later half of the sentence. In the OA, "as long as" is used to present the length of a computer. is that usage not wrong? How can " as long as" signify length of an object?
As per my knowledge " as long as" is used in 3 scenarios
1. For the duration
2. On the condition that
3. for emphasis before number

Requesting you to please elaborate the solution.
Retired Moderator
User avatar
G
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 3126
Location: Germany
Schools: HHL Leipzig
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Nov 2016, 10:18
1
aamir89 wrote:
daagh wrote:
Stelle wrote

Quote:
I still don't get the rule. Could someone please explain when to use "claim to be" and when to use "claim is"?
I am pretty sure I have heard sentences like "She claims to be the king's daughter", and cannot understand on what context it becomes "claims is the king's daughter".


The answer lies how confident the company is about the claim; if the company feels very confident, then it can forthrightly declare that ‘it claims is’. On the contrary, if it is a little hesitant, then it might say that ‘it claims to be’; however both expressions are correct in their own right. Only thing, in the current context, ‘claims is’ more appropriate since the company is quite in candid its claim.





Sir the information you presented above is quite an eye opener. but i would like to draw your attention to the later half of the sentence. In the OA, "as long as" is used to present the length of a computer. is that usage not wrong? How can " as long as" signify length of an object?
As per my knowledge " as long as" is used in 3 scenarios
1. For the duration
2. On the condition that
3. for emphasis before number

Requesting you to please elaborate the solution.


You are referring to the idiomatic use of the phrase "as long as". However here "as long as" is not used as a single idiom.

Here a different idiom " as..as.." is used. The structure of this idiom is:
as+adjective+as+ clause/noun ( the adjective need not be "long" - it could be any adjective including "long".)

He is as tall as I am.
This bench is as long as that bench.
This dish is not as tasty as the one we had last time.

Note that the usage "as long as" in the second example is not as the idiom "as long as" , but as the idiom " as... as...".
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 28 Sep 2016
Posts: 14
Location: India
Schools: Kellogg '13, ISB, NUS '19
GMAT 1: 760 Q51 V42
GPA: 3.5
Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Dec 2016, 00:55
Ques- The electronics company has unveiled what it claims "to be the world's smallest network digital camcorder......". In the sentence containing Claims, should it be followed by To be or can is be also used? As in "what it claims is the world's smallest..."


Sent from my iPhone using GMAT Club Forum mobile app
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4667
Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Dec 2016, 12:57
piyush_89 wrote:
Ques- The electronics company has unveiled what it claims "to be the world's smallest network digital camcorder......". In the sentence containing Claims, should it be followed by To be or can is be also used? As in "what it claims is the world's smallest..."

Dear piyush_89,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

You may be interested in GMAT Idiom Flashcards.

The verb "to claim" is a transitive verb, that is, a verb that takes a direct object. This direct object can be a simple noun:
The suspect claims innocence.
The settler claimed the land by the river.

More interesting usages, such as are likely on the GMAT SC, involve something "noun-like" taking the place of a noun. This could be
a) a "that" clause (technically known as a substantive clause)
b) an infinitive phrase
Thus, we could correctly say:
The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world's smallest network digital camcorder ... (infinitive direct object)
or
The electronics company claims that it has just unveiled the world's smallest network digital camcorder ... ("that"-clause direct object)

The following construction would not work on the GMAT:
The electronics company has unveiled what it claims is the world's smallest network digital camcorder . . .
This would be typical in American colloquial English, but grammatically, it's sloppy. It's very informal and would never be acceptable on the GMAT.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Manager
Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 10 Apr 2015
Posts: 195
GPA: 3.31
Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Mar 2017, 05:38
The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world's smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, and it weighs less than 11 ounces.

'X' claims to be the world’s smallest network digital camcorder.RIGHT
The electronics company claims to be the world's smallest network digital camcorder WRONG.
A. to be the world's smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, and it weighs

B. to be the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, which is as long as a handheld computer, weighing
world's MISSING.

C. is the smallest network digital camcorder, which is as long as a handheld cmoputer and weighs
world's MISSING.
D. is the world's smallest network digital camcorder, which is as long as a handheld computer and weighs
CORRECT.
E. is the world's smalles network digital camcorder, the lenght of which is that of a handheld computer, weighing
_________________

In case you find my posts helpful, give me Kudos. Thank you.

Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 04 Apr 2015
Posts: 186
Reviews Badge
Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Oct 2017, 05:57
Hi Expert,
Can you please explain why D and not E?
Claims to be is the right idiom why is claim is being used in this?
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2003
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Oct 2017, 11:20
StrugglingGmat2910 wrote:
Hi Expert,
Can you please explain why D and not E?
Claims to be is the right idiom why is claim is being used in this?

This issue has already been covered in quite a bit of detail above. Start with @daagh's post at this link: https://gmatclub.com/forum/the-electron ... l#p1554895, then read the ensuing discussion from there -- plenty of very sharp members have offered their views. The short version: there's certainly no rule that dictates that "claims to be" is correct and "claims is" is wrong.
_________________

GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | GMAT blog | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja and @GMATNinjaTwo in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 19 Aug 2017
Posts: 26
The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Jan 2018, 23:34
I have a doubt

Is the use of " world's smallest network digital camcorder " correct???

For example

Right usage : Month of festival
Wrong usage : Festival's month

Similarly, wont "world's smallest network digital camcorder" be incorrect?
instead it should have been The smallest network digital camcorder in the world

Note : My concern is not regarding the use of "which" .... I got that part

Please help!!
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2003
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Jan 2018, 14:09
1
1
MSarmah wrote:
I have a doubt

Is the use of " world's smallest network digital camcorder " correct???

For example

Right usage : Month of festival
Wrong usage : Festival's month

Similarly, wont "world's smallest network digital camcorder" be incorrect?
instead it should have been The smallest network digital camcorder in the world

Note : My concern is not regarding the use of "which" .... I got that part

Please help!!

Hm, yeah - when you put it that way, the GMAT does look a little bit inconsistent on this. (And for anybody who doesn't recognize it, the reference to the "festival's month" vs. "the month of the festival" is in this OG question: https://gmatclub.com/forum/the-olympic- ... 85874.html.)

But here's the thing: nobody would ever claim that it's an absolute rule that the possessive version ("festival's month" or "world's smallest digital camcorder") is always wrong, and that the version with a preposition is always right ("month of the festival", "smallest digital camcorder in the world"). You just have to think about whether the possessive plausibly makes sense:

  • "the festival's month" --> In what sense does the festival somehow "possess" the month? I don't think that makes sense.
  • "the world's smallest camcorder" --> Personally, I'd prefer the phrase "the smallest camcorder in the world", but I don't think it's WRONG to say "the world's smallest camcorder." In some sense, the world "possesses"... well, everything in the world. So this isn't completely illogical.

And more importantly: you're never looking for a perfect sentence on the GMAT, just the BEST of five flawed sentences. In other words, find the four sentences that contain the most serious errors (more on this in our beginner's guide to SC). In the question about "the month of the festival", the difference between "the festival's month" and "the month of the festival" isn't the only difference between answer choices (B) and (D) -- there's arguably another reason why the answer is what it is. And as you recognized, there are definitely bigger issues ("which"!) in some of the answer choices in this thread, too.

Bottom line: the form of the possessive is not an absolute rule, though it certainly could affect meaning. And it's hard to come up with official examples in which the difference in the form of the possessive is the ONLY issue, or even the main issue.

I hope this helps!
_________________

GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | GMAT blog | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja and @GMATNinjaTwo in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

Verbal Forum Moderator
User avatar
V
Status: Greatness begins beyond your comfort zone
Joined: 08 Dec 2013
Posts: 2113
Location: India
Concentration: General Management, Strategy
Schools: Kelley '20, ISB '19
GPA: 3.2
WE: Information Technology (Consulting)
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Mar 2018, 22:08
prasannar wrote:
The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, and it weighs less than 11 ounces.

(A) to be the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, and it weighs
(B) to be the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, which is as long as a handheld computer, weighing
(C) is the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, which is as long as a handheld computer, and it weighs
(D) is the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, which is as long as a handheld computer and weighs
(E) is the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, weighing


AjiteshArun , GMATNinja , ChiranjeevSingh, mikemcgarry , egmat , sayantanc2k, RonPurewal , DmitryFarber , MagooshExpert other experts

In option D , is what it claims is correct ? How is the OA - D in this question different from incorrect option C(see below) in terms of usage of 2 verbs in a row ?


https://gmatclub.com/forum/researchers- ... 37248.html
In option C , for the below question, I read that C has two verbs in a row, both of which ostensibly have the same subject ("appears was")

option C-->Researchers in Germany have unearthed 400,000-year-old wooden spears from what appears was an ancient lakeshore hunting ground and is stunning evidence that human ancestors systematically hunted big game much earlier than believed
_________________

When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it. - Henry Ford
The Moment You Think About Giving Up, Think Of The Reason Why You Held On So Long
+1 Kudos if you find this post helpful

SVP
SVP
User avatar
V
Joined: 15 Jul 2015
Posts: 1698
Location: India
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V169
Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Mar 2018, 07:20
Skywalker18 wrote:
AjiteshArun , GMATNinja , ChiranjeevSingh, mikemcgarry , egmat , sayantanc2k, RonPurewal , DmitryFarber , MagooshExpert other experts

In option D , is what it claims is correct ? How is the OA - D in this question different from incorrect option C(see below) in terms of usage of 2 verbs in a row ?
The difference is that this option has a subject+verb + verb after the what (and not verb + verb). The thing to remember here is that the two verbs are not for the same subject. In fact, the first two elements (subject+verb) should just be ignored if you want to check the structure of the sentence.

(S+V) + (S+V)
This is the question that I think you should solve.
should be read as
This is the question that I think you should solve.
or
This is the question that (in my opinion) you should solve.

(S+V) + V
This is the question that I think cannot be solved.
should be read as
This is the question that I think cannot be solved.
or
This is the question that (in my opinion) cannot be solved.
or
This is the question that cannot, I think, be solved.
_________________

Ascore Prep | Live Online

Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
S
Joined: 30 Oct 2017
Posts: 171
Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Mar 2018, 21:15
Skywalker18 wrote:

AjiteshArun , GMATNinja , ChiranjeevSingh, mikemcgarry , egmat , sayantanc2k, RonPurewal , DmitryFarber , MagooshExpert other experts

In option D , is what it claims is correct ? How is the OA - D in this question different from incorrect option C(see below) in terms of usage of 2 verbs in a row ?


https://gmatclub.com/forum/researchers- ... 37248.html
In option C , for the below question, I read that C has two verbs in a row, both of which ostensibly have the same subject ("appears was")

option C-->Researchers in Germany have unearthed 400,000-year-old wooden spears from what appears was an ancient lakeshore hunting ground and is stunning evidence that human ancestors systematically hunted big game much earlier than believed


Hi Skywalker18,

While this is an unorthodox construction, "claims is" is correct here. As AjiteshArun explained, it's different than the example you mentioned because "claims" and "was" both have different subjects, so there isn't a problem :-) The subject of "claims" is "the electronics company", but the subject of "was" is "what" (referring to the camcorder). The subject of "was" is not "the electronics company". In the other example you mentioned, both "appears" and "was" have the same subject ("what"), which is what makes it problematic.

Hope that clears things up! :-)
-Carolyn
_________________

Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s &nbs [#permalink] 04 Mar 2018, 21:15

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3    Next  [ 43 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Events & Promotions

PREV
NEXT


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.