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The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s

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New post 21 Feb 2019, 09:05
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New post 06 Jun 2019, 05:16
Not able to understand why D would be the answer. Can someone help eliminate others?
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New post 15 Jun 2019, 23:34
goalsnr wrote:
Here "claims to be" is a trap.
Most of us will blindly eliminate C,D,E for incorrect idiom usage.

In A , "it" does not have a clear referrant.

On the "Manhattan" Sc forum I found this explanation

They are claiming that it IS something - not that it "to be" something - so, no, we wouldn't use "to be" here. We'd say "the company has unveiled what it claims is the world's smallest..."

I could say, though, "she claims to be a violinist, but I've heard her play and she's terrible." So there are circumstances in which you could use "claim to be" - but this isn't one of them.

And, yes, answer is D.

---

Claiming something itself means it is not proven but one believes it to be. isn't it? For Ex: I claim to be the tallest person in the world. Not even if it is a fact that I am the tallest in the world, I cannot say I claim is .
SC manhatten also says that 'Claims to be " is the correct idiom.

Please explain.
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New post 22 Jun 2019, 23:49
There is a lot of discussion about option B..
claim to be / claim is .. I really don’t know.. neither does option b have any issues with the usage of pronoun “which”..

Option B is simply wrong due to an issue with the modifier.

The doer ie the electronics company has unveiled something, weighing less than 11 ounces.. <—— does this make sense at all? Clearly it doesn’t make any sense.

P.S just to make my analysis concrete AjiteshArun is my analysis okay?

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New post 24 Jun 2019, 06:59
What is wrong with "to be" construction in option A & B ?
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New post 25 Jun 2019, 09:40
So I get why "to be" can't be used in this sentence. I also get why "..the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, which.." is acceptable (because which is modifying the noun phrase here). But why can't (c) be the answer? Is it because "it" in "and it weighs" is ambiguous? Thanks :)
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New post 26 Jun 2019, 19:04
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hammypancakey wrote:
So I get why "to be" can't be used in this sentence. I also get why "..the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, which.." is acceptable (because which is modifying the noun phrase here). But why can't (c) be the answer? Is it because "it" in "and it weighs" is ambiguous? Thanks :)

Typically, when we get a subject pronoun, the referent for the pronoun is the subject of the previous clause. Take a look at (C) with the "which" modifier removed:

"The electronics company has unveiled what it claims is the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, and it weighs less than 11 ounces."

The subject of the previous clause is the electronics company! Perhaps in the future, when algorithms run everything, we'll see the advent of a 10-ounce electronics company, but until then, we're just gonna have to accept that this construction isn't terribly logical.

To be fair, I'm not sure that the pronoun is WRONG, exactly. But at the very least, the pronoun is confusing. Notice that (D) doesn't have that problem at all: because the phrase "weighs less than 11 ounces" is part of the modifier, the meaning is 100% clear -- and much better than the potentially illogical meaning in (C).

I hope that helps!
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New post 01 Jul 2019, 12:34
Gmat Ninja please rescue, is there anything else wrong in A apart from pronoun ambiguity?
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New post 02 Jul 2019, 15:41
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MS1014 wrote:
Gmat Ninja please rescue, is there anything else wrong in A apart from pronoun ambiguity?

It's not often that "rescue" and "pronoun ambiguity" get tossed into the same sentence, but... I guess the heroism of GMAT tutors has been overlooked for far too long? :) (bb, can we replace my profile pic with an image of a ninja rescuing a kitten from a tree? No?)

Just to clarify, the problem in (A) isn't pronoun ambiguity, so much as pronoun incoherence. It would be one thing to claim that "it" could refer to one more than antecedent. That's not necessarily wrong. It's a very different thing to say that the apparent antecedent is illogical, as it is in (A).

But if you want a different decision point, take a look at the highlighted region of (A):

    "The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer..."

The "which" seems to refer to the "camcorder." Fair enough. But it wouldn't make any sense for "that" to refer to the camcorder as well, so now we have to go looking for a different antecedent. Most likely "that" refers to the "length." So now, after doing a fair amount of work, we'd have the following: "the length of [the camcorder] is [the length] of a handheld computer."

This seems problematic. It's fine to say that two lengths are similar, or that one entity is as long as another. But to claim that one length is another length? Seems fishy to me. At best, it's confusing, and it takes effort to pull any sort of reasonable meaning out of it.

Compare this to the same area of the OA:

    "The electronics company has unveiled what it claims is the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, which is as long as a handheld computer and weighs..."

This is crystal clear. "Which" refers to the "camcorder." And we're told that the camcorder is as long as a handheld computer. Perfectly simple and logical. Most importantly, it's far superior to (A).

I hope that helps!
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New post 02 Jul 2019, 17:08
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GMATNinja
I think, you wrote the same thing double in your last example, did you?
GMATNinja wrote:
MS1014 wrote:
Gmat Ninja please rescue, is there anything else wrong in A apart from pronoun ambiguity?

It's not often that "rescue" and "pronoun ambiguity" get tossed into the same sentence, but... I guess the heroism of GMAT tutors has been overlooked for far too long? :) (bb, can we replace my profile pic with an image of a ninja rescuing a kitten from a tree? No?)

Just to clarify, the problem in (A) isn't pronoun ambiguity, so much as pronoun incoherence. It would be one thing to claim that "it" could refer to one more than antecedent. That's not necessarily wrong. It's a very different thing to say that the apparent antecedent is illogical, as it is in (A).

But if you want a different decision point, take a look at the highlighted region of (A):

    "The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer..."

The "which" seems to refer to the "camcorder." Fair enough. But it wouldn't make any sense for "that" to refer to the camcorder as well, so now we have to go looking for a different antecedent. Most likely "that" refers to the "length." So now, after doing a fair amount of work, we'd have the following: "the length of [the camcorder] is [the length] of a handheld computer."

This seems problematic. It's fine to say that two lengths are similar, or that one entity is as long as another. But to claim that one length is another length? Seems fishy to me. At best, it's confusing, and it takes effort to pull any sort of reasonable meaning out of it.

Compare this to the same area of the OA:

    "The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, is the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, which is as long as a handheld computer and weighs..."

This is crystal clear. "Which" refers to the "camcorder." And we're told that the camcorder is as long as a handheld computer. Perfectly simple and logical. Most importantly, it's far superior to (A).

I hope that helps!


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Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jul 2019, 15:26
Asad wrote:
GMATNinja
I think, you wrote the same thing double in your last example, did you?

Yup! Thank you for catching that, Asad -- much appreciated. I edited my original post, so it should be better now. :)
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New post 04 Jul 2019, 03:07
egmat wrote:
Hi sujit2k,

This is in response to your PM.

Well, there are many official questions in which the noun modifiers do not follow "touch" rule. Here are a few examples:

1. Although she had been known as an effective legislator first in the Texas Senate and later in the United States House of Representatives, Barbara Jordan did not become a nationally recognized figure until 1974, when she participated in the hearings on the impeachment of President Richard Nixon, which were televised nationwide.

2. What scientists know about dinosaur brains comes from studies of the cranium, the bony house of the brain located in the back of the skull.

3. Emily Dickinson’s letters to Susan Huntington Dickinson, which were written over a period beginning a few years before Susan’s marriage to Emily’s brother and ending shortly before Emily’s death in 1886, outnumber her letters to anyone else.

Now let's look at Choice B of this question at hand:

B. to be the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, which is as long as a handheld computer, weighing: In my opinion, there is no issue with the reference of "which" because logically it should refer to "the smallest network digital camcorder". But yes, this choice is incorrect for the use of "to be".

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
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Hi,

I have come across these examples before, especially the 'Susan Huttington case'. Could you please clarify when can we expect these exceptions to be valid ?

Also if you could explain when to use Claims to be vs Claims that....
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New post 04 Jul 2019, 08:35
prasannar wrote:
The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, and it weighs less than 11 ounces.


(A) to be the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, and it weighs

(B) to be the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, which is as long as a handheld computer, weighing

(C) is the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, which is as long as a handheld computer, and it weighs

(D) is the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, which is as long as a handheld computer and weighs

(E) is the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, weighing



Revealed is better to go with "IS" As compare to "to be"
A ,B : Eliminated
C : comma unnecesary and it makes redundancy
D : Coincise & Good sentence
E : the length of which & weighing is too explanatory

D is Good choice
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New post 08 Jul 2019, 21:40
GMATNinja here in option B does which refer to camcorder or to the world?
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New post 23 Jul 2019, 20:08
Aviral1995 wrote:
GMATNinja here in option B does which refer to camcorder or to the world?

In general, it's not a problem at all for "which" (or "that") to "reach" behind a prepositional phrase to modify a noun. In this case, it's pretty clear that the which clause modifies "camcorder" and not "world" (since the world is obviously not as long as a handheld computer).

For examples of this phenomenon using “that” and “which”, check out this question or this question or this question. For a broader discussion of “that” and the “touch rule”, see this article or this video.

I hope this helps!
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New post 31 Aug 2019, 15:57
daagh generis GMATNinja

Hi,

in option (E) The electronics company has unveiled what it claims is the world???s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, weighing less than 11 ounces.

if we remove the non essential modifier, the option (E) reads as,

The electronics company has unveiled what it claims is the world???s smallest network digital camcorder weighing less than 11 ounces.

Here weighing correctly appears to be modifying camcorder, so does this mean that there is no modifier error related to weighing in this option ?
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New post 31 Aug 2019, 19:21
altairahmad wrote:
daagh generis GMATNinja

Hi,

in option (E) The electronics company has unveiled what it claims is the world???s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, weighing less than 11 ounces.

if we remove the non essential modifier, the option (E) reads as,

The electronics company has unveiled what it claims is the world???s smallest network digital camcorder weighing less than 11 ounces.

Here weighing correctly appears to be modifying camcorder, so does this mean that there is no modifier error related to weighing in this option ?

Hi altairahmad .

No, I think there IS modifier error in E. Removing the modifier changes the core meaning of the sentence.

The sentence with (E) inserted:
• The electronics company has unveiled what it claims is the world’s smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, weighing less than 11 ounces.

Meaning? The company has unveiled what it claims is the world's smallest camcorder.
The camcorder is the length of a handheld computer and weighs less than 11 ounces.

Commas do not always signal "nonessential."
Sometimes we need them for clarity.

Your edited sentence says,
• The electronics company has unveiled what it claims is the world's smallest network digital camcorder weighing less than 11 ounces
Focus on the highlighted part.
The group is different: what "smallest" is measured against has been restricted.

Removing the clause changes the core meaning of the sentence.
The edited option E says that the company has unveiled the world's smallest camcorder [out of all those camcorders] weighing less than 11 ounces.

Without the clause, the group to which this camcorder belongs is more restricted than what the sentence means.
The sentence without the clause says that
The company has unveiled the world's smallest camcorder out of all those camcorders that weigh less than 11 ounces.

I hope that helps. If not, ask another question. I'm happy to try to help.
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New post 31 Aug 2019, 22:29
Thanks for your response.

generis wrote:
altairahmad wrote:
Commas do not always signal "nonessential."
Sometimes we need them for clarity.


1. How do I decide which phrases/clauses in commas can I remove and which I can not, as removing such phrases/clauses have helped me to reach the right answer many times. And then there are situations like these where such phrases/clauses should not be removed.

Shouldn't an overall sentence make sense once we remove the comma restricted phrases and clauses ?

2. Originally, going through explanations posted here, I have read that 'weighing' is modifying the length clause and is not conveying the correct meaning. However, if we remove the non-essential clause, 'weighing' does appear to modify the required noun properly.

I think that there is no modifier error in (E) as is. It may be wordier and that's all. Is that correct ?

3. This brings me to another question, is -ing always going to modify the attached clause ? even if it is just a non-essential modifier ?

4. I am a bit confused about the usage of 'as long as'. e.g in (D) when we use 'as X as' does it automatically imply that we are comparing same parameter i.e length in this case ?

Thanks again.
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