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The hibiscus bush is both native and common to many regions

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The hibiscus bush is both native and common to many regions  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2010, 02:24
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The hibiscus bush is both native and common to many regions of the Middle East. The pest of the hibiscus plant is an insect belonging to the Formicidae family, the hibiscus ant, which traces the scent of the hibiscus flower and covers the pistil, making the pollen inaccessible to flying insects, such as bees, that pollinate the plant; as a result, the hibiscus ant prevents the plant from reproducing. The Society for the Preservation of Native Flora of the Middle East plans to increase the presence of the hibiscus plant in urban areas by introducing to these areas a predator of the hibiscus ant, the Ant-eating Chat, a Southern African bird that belongs to the Muscicapidae bird family.

Which of the following questions is important to evaluating the plan of the Society for the Preservation of Native Flora of the Middle East?

A. How much will introducing the Chat cost the municipal governments?

B. How much do local residents of the areas where the Chat is to be introduced care about urban beautification projects?

C. Is the Chat able to migrate after being transported unnaturally from one region of the world to another?

D. Will the Chat be able to nest and reproduce in the physical and climatic conditions of the Middle East?

E. Is there a different flowering plant that is more worthwhile for the Society for the Preservation of Native Flora of the Middle East to preserve than the hibiscus plant?
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Re: The hibiscus bush is both native and common to many regions  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jun 2010, 10:35
Nice job...

The hibiscus bush is both native and common to many regions of the Middle East. The pest of the hibiscus plant is an insect belonging to the Formicidae family, the hibiscus ant, which traces the scent of the hibiscus flower and covers the pistil, making the pollen inaccessible to flying insects, such as bees, that pollinate the plant; as a result, the hibiscus ant prevents the plant from reproducing. The Society for the Preservation of Native Flora of the Middle East plans to increase the presence of the hibiscus plant in urban areas by introducing to these areas a predator of the hibiscus ant, the Ant-eating Chat, a Southern African bird that belongs to the Muscicapidae bird family.

Which of the following questions is important to evaluating the plan of the Society for the Preservation of Native Flora of the Middle East?

A. How much will introducing the Chat cost the municipal governments?
A. The cost of the plan will not determine the effectiveness of the plan, only the feasibility of the plan.

B. How much do local residents of the areas where the Chat is to be introduced care about urban beautification projects?
B. Residents' general attitude toward beautification projects does not reflect on the potential success of fighting off the hibiscus ant by introducing the Chat.

C. Is the Chat able to migrate after being transported unnaturally from one region of the world to another?
C. The migratory behavior of the Chat does not impact the bird's eating habits nor its ability to curb the hibiscus ant population.

D. Will the Chat be able to nest and reproduce in the physical and climatic conditions of the Middle East?
D. Correct: If the Chat population cannot be maintained, then it will not be able combat the hibiscus pest and, therefore, will not help increase the presence of the plant.

E. Is there a different flowering plant that is more worthwhile for the Society for the Preservation of Native Flora of the Middle East to preserve than the hibiscus plant?
E. The goal of the plan pertains specifically to the hibiscus, and, therefore, the worthiness of other plants is irrelevant to the plan.
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Re: The hibiscus bush is both native and common to many regions  [#permalink]

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New post 09 May 2012, 07:32
+1 D

If the bird cannot nest and reproduce, eventualy they will die. Therefore, the strategy won't cause the desired result.
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Re: The hibiscus bush is both native and common to many regions  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Aug 2019, 20:56
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SaraiGMAT wrote:
Nice job...

The hibiscus bush is both native and common to many regions of the Middle East. The pest of the hibiscus plant is an insect belonging to the Formicidae family, the hibiscus ant, which traces the scent of the hibiscus flower and covers the pistil, making the pollen inaccessible to flying insects, such as bees, that pollinate the plant; as a result, the hibiscus ant prevents the plant from reproducing. The Society for the Preservation of Native Flora of the Middle East plans to increase the presence of the hibiscus plant in urban areas by introducing to these areas a predator of the hibiscus ant, the Ant-eating Chat, a Southern African bird that belongs to the Muscicapidae bird family.

Which of the following questions is important to evaluating the plan of the Society for the Preservation of Native Flora of the Middle East?

A. How much will introducing the Chat cost the municipal governments?
A. The cost of the plan will not determine the effectiveness of the plan, only the feasibility of the plan.

B. How much do local residents of the areas where the Chat is to be introduced care about urban beautification projects?
B. Residents' general attitude toward beautification projects does not reflect on the potential success of fighting off the hibiscus ant by introducing the Chat.

C. Is the Chat able to migrate after being transported unnaturally from one region of the world to another?
C. The migratory behavior of the Chat does not impact the bird's eating habits nor its ability to curb the hibiscus ant population.

D. Will the Chat be able to nest and reproduce in the physical and climatic conditions of the Middle East?
D. Correct: If the Chat population cannot be maintained, then it will not be able combat the hibiscus pest and, therefore, will not help increase the presence of the plant.

E. Is there a different flowering plant that is more worthwhile for the Society for the Preservation of Native Flora of the Middle East to preserve than the hibiscus plant?
E. The goal of the plan pertains specifically to the hibiscus, and, therefore, the worthiness of other plants is irrelevant to the plan.


Hello ma'am

I have a different opinion. I chose option C. I took the option to 2 extreme ends, one supported the conclusion and the other broke it down
Is the Chat able to migrate after being transported unnaturally from one region of the world to another - YES - This breaks the conclusion as birds will no longer be present to eat the ants and hence the strategy will fail.
Is the Chat able to migrate after being transported unnaturally from one region of the world to another - NO - This supports the conclusion as the birds will be present in the region, and in order to survive, they will eat the ants and hence this strengthens the conclusion

I agree with option D also, please help me understand where is my reasoning wrong

Thanks
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Re: The hibiscus bush is both native and common to many regions   [#permalink] 08 Aug 2019, 20:56
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The hibiscus bush is both native and common to many regions

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