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Three friends are trying to decide how to split up a tub of ice cream.

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Three friends are trying to decide how to split up a tub of ice cream.  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 06 Apr 2017, 05:20
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  35% (medium)

Question Stats:

68% (01:43) correct 32% (01:28) wrong based on 60 sessions

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Three friends are trying to decide how to split up a tub of ice cream. One will get exactly 2/3 of the ice cream, and the others will share the rest. How many ounces of ice cream did the friend who received the smallest amount get?

(1) The friend with the second largest amount received 1/3 of the 12 ounces of ice cream received by the friend with the largest amount.

(2) The friend with the smallest amount received 1/5 of the amount received by the friend with the second largest amount.

Can two options give Contrasting answers??
Here statement two doesnt give value consistent with One :|

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Kudos-----> If my post was Helpful

Originally posted by VyshakhR1995 on 06 Apr 2017, 04:02.
Last edited by Bunuel on 06 Apr 2017, 05:20, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: Three friends are trying to decide how to split up a tub of ice cream.  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Apr 2017, 05:22
2
VyshakhR1995 wrote:
Three friends are trying to decide how to split up a tub of ice cream. One will get exactly 2/3 of the ice cream, and the others will share the rest. How many ounces of ice cream did the friend who received the smallest amount get?

(1) The friend with the second largest amount received 1/3 of the 12 ounces of ice cream received by the friend with the largest amount.

(2) The friend with the smallest amount received 1/5 of the amount received by the friend with the second largest amount.

Can two options give Contrasting answers??
Here statement two doesnt give value consistent with One :|


No that cannot happen.

On the GMAT, two data sufficiency statements always provide TRUE information and these statements NEVER contradict each other or the stem.
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Joined: 02 Mar 2017
Posts: 256
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Re: Three friends are trying to decide how to split up a tub of ice cream.  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Apr 2017, 06:06
Bunuel wrote:
VyshakhR1995 wrote:
Three friends are trying to decide how to split up a tub of ice cream. One will get exactly 2/3 of the ice cream, and the others will share the rest. How many ounces of ice cream did the friend who received the smallest amount get?

(1) The friend with the second largest amount received 1/3 of the 12 ounces of ice cream received by the friend with the largest amount.

(2) The friend with the smallest amount received 1/5 of the amount received by the friend with the second largest amount.

Can two options give Contrasting answers??
Here statement two doesnt give value consistent with One :|


No that cannot happen.

On the GMAT, two data sufficiency statements always provide TRUE information and these statements NEVER contradict each other or the stem.



In this question it is contracting right...Just to make sure i havent missed anything..
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Re: Three friends are trying to decide how to split up a tub of ice cream.  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Apr 2017, 06:17
VyshakhR1995 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
VyshakhR1995 wrote:
Three friends are trying to decide how to split up a tub of ice cream. One will get exactly 2/3 of the ice cream, and the others will share the rest. How many ounces of ice cream did the friend who received the smallest amount get?

(1) The friend with the second largest amount received 1/3 of the 12 ounces of ice cream received by the friend with the largest amount.

(2) The friend with the smallest amount received 1/5 of the amount received by the friend with the second largest amount.

Can two options give Contrasting answers??
Here statement two doesnt give value consistent with One :|


No that cannot happen.

On the GMAT, two data sufficiency statements always provide TRUE information and these statements NEVER contradict each other or the stem.



In this question it is contracting right...Just to make sure i havent missed anything..

________________________
Yes, the statements contradict.
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Re: Three friends are trying to decide how to split up a tub of ice cream.  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jul 2017, 08:49
VyshakhR1995 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
VyshakhR1995 wrote:
Three friends are trying to decide how to split up a tub of ice cream. One will get exactly 2/3 of the ice cream, and the others will share the rest. How many ounces of ice cream did the friend who received the smallest amount get?

(1) The friend with the second largest amount received 1/3 of the 12 ounces of ice cream received by the friend with the largest amount.

(2) The friend with the smallest amount received 1/5 of the amount received by the friend with the second largest amount.

Can two options give Contrasting answers??
Here statement two doesnt give value consistent with One :|


No that cannot happen.

On the GMAT, two data sufficiency statements always provide TRUE information and these statements NEVER contradict each other or the stem.



In this question it is contracting right...Just to make sure i havent missed anything..


One Statement cannot contadict the other if they both are true or they both give enough info.
In this question statement 1 is the only correct and sufficient one while statement 2 isn't sufficient so it could contain any flawed information :)
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Re: Three friends are trying to decide how to split up a tub of ice cream.  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jul 2017, 09:02
MvArrow wrote:

One Statement cannot contadict the other if they both are true or they both give enough info.
In this question statement 1 is the only correct and sufficient one while statement 2 isn't sufficient so it could contain any flawed information :)


No, that's not correct.

On the GMAT, two data sufficiency statements always provide TRUE information and these statements NEVER contradict each other or the stem.
_________________
Current Student
User avatar
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Joined: 06 Sep 2016
Posts: 129
Location: Italy
Schools: EDHEC (A$)
GMAT 1: 650 Q43 V37
GPA: 3.2
WE: General Management (Human Resources)
Re: Three friends are trying to decide how to split up a tub of ice cream.  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jul 2017, 10:09
Bunuel wrote:
MvArrow wrote:

One Statement cannot contadict the other if they both are true or they both give enough info.
In this question statement 1 is the only correct and sufficient one while statement 2 isn't sufficient so it could contain any flawed information :)


No, that's not correct.

On the GMAT, two data sufficiency statements always provide TRUE information and these statements NEVER contradict each other or the stem.


Thanks a lot for this clarification!
So in this case, is the question made incorrectly?

Thanks
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Joined: 02 Sep 2009
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Re: Three friends are trying to decide how to split up a tub of ice cream.  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jul 2017, 10:23
MvArrow wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
MvArrow wrote:

One Statement cannot contadict the other if they both are true or they both give enough info.
In this question statement 1 is the only correct and sufficient one while statement 2 isn't sufficient so it could contain any flawed information :)


No, that's not correct.

On the GMAT, two data sufficiency statements always provide TRUE information and these statements NEVER contradict each other or the stem.


Thanks a lot for this clarification!
So in this case, is the question made incorrectly?

Thanks


Yes, hence the tag Poor Quality.
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Re: Three friends are trying to decide how to split up a tub of ice cream.   [#permalink] 03 Jul 2017, 10:23
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Three friends are trying to decide how to split up a tub of ice cream.

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