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Tides typically range from three to six feet but while some

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Tides typically range from three to six feet but while some [#permalink]

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The Official Guide for GMAT Review 2018
Practice Question
Sentence Correction
Question No.: 745

Tides typically range from three to six feet, but while some places show no tides at all, some others, such as the Bay of Fundy, have tides of at least thirty feet and more.

A. some others, such as the Bay of Fundy, have tides of at least thirty feet and more
B. the others, such as the Bay of Fundy, that have tides of more than thirty feet
C. others, such as the Bay of Fundy, have tides of more than thirty feet
D. those at the Bay of Fundy, which has tides of more than thirty feet
E. the ones at the Bay of Fundy have tides of at least thirty feet and more
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Last edited by souvik101990 on 27 Jun 2017, 12:31, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Tides typically range from three to six feet but while some [#permalink]

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AbdurRakib wrote:
Tides typically range from three to six feet, but while some places show no tides at all, some others, such as the Bay of Fundy, have tides of at least thirty feet and more.

A. some others, such as the Bay of Fundy, have tides of at least thirty feet and more
B. the others, such as the Bay of Fundy, that have tides of more than thirty feet
C. others, such as the Bay of Fundy, have tides of more than thirty feet
D. those at the Bay of Fundy, which has tides of more than thirty feet
E. the ones at the Bay of Fundy have tides of at least thirty feet and more

Dear AbdurRakib,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

First of all, notice that "at least thirty feet and more" is wildly redundant. We can say either "at least thirty feet" or "thirty feet and more," but we can't combine those two. Choice (A) & (E) are automatically out.

The most natural idiom here is "while some do X, others do Y." The natural contrast of "some" is "others." The constructions "some others" and "the others" are incorrect, so (A) & (B) are wrong.

Finally, notice that (D) & (E) change the meaning. The prompt contrasts most tides to another category with big tides, and this latter category includes the Bay of Fundy as an example. Both (D) & (E) make the mistake of comparing all other tides to just the Bay of Fundy specifically, as if that were the only spot on earth with gigantic tides. These are wrong.

The only possible answer is (C), the OA. This is a truly excellent question, as the official questions typically are.

Does this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Tides typically range from three to six feet but while some [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jun 2017, 01:15
Imo C
A is wordy
B that is not required
Which is wrong in D
E wordy and awkward

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Re: Tides typically range from three to six feet but while some [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jun 2017, 06:08
Tides typically range from three to six feet, but while some places show no tides at all, some others, such as the Bay of Fundy, have tides of at least thirty feet and more.

A. some others, such as the Bay of Fundy, have tides of at least thirty feet and more
B. the others, such as the Bay of Fundy, that have tides of more than thirty feet
C. others, such as the Bay of Fundy, have tides of more than thirty feet
D. those at the Bay of Fundy, which has tides of more than thirty feet
E. the ones at the Bay of Fundy have tides of at least thirty feet and more
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NOTE: I am not an expert, therefore my analysis answering the questions may be incorrect and may not be relied upon. However I will appreciate if you can correct the mistakes I may have made in my analysis.

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Re: Tides typically range from three to six feet but while some [#permalink]

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In original sentence it says tides can be atleast 30 feet but Option C says more than 30 feet. Doesn't it change the meaning of the original sentence. ?

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Re: Tides typically range from three to six feet but while some [#permalink]

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somtsat99 wrote:
In original sentence it says tides can be atleast 30 feet but Option C says more than 30 feet. Doesn't it change the meaning of the original sentence. ?

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Hi somtsat99 ,

You missed a very small point in option A.

It says atleast 30 feet AND more. This means it has to be greater than 30. Hence, option C is clearly maintaining the original meaning.
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Tides typically range from three to six feet but while some [#permalink]

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somtsat99 wrote:
In original sentence it says tides can be atleast 30 feet but Option C says more than 30 feet. Doesn't it change the meaning of the original sentence. ?

Dear somtsat99,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

My friend, I think you are bringing mathematical logic to a SC question. Why this is problematic is very subtle.

You see, in math, we can talk about the precise number 30. If it's true that x = 30, then the statements x > 30 and x < 30 are both false. In the realm of mathematics, there's an infinity of difference between, say, 30 and 30 + (10^-50). Mathematics is realm of perfect precision.

Now, the thing that many students don't appreciate is that this side of math, the perfect precision, absolutely does not exist in the real world. It's funny: in math class and on the Quant section of the GMAT, you need to have this mindset of precision, but in many ways, that precision is a fiction that doesn't exist anywhere else.

Here, in this problem, we are talking about ocean tides. Whether the ocean is at high tide or low tide, there are always waves, sometimes small waves and sometimes large waves. I don't think it would make sense to talk about a tide that was exactly mathematically 30 ft. Among other things, a measurement of that magnitude would involve measurements down to the individual atom, and I can guarantee that the oceanographers who are studying these tides are not concerned with individual atoms. Similarly, 30 and 30 + (10^-50) are completely distinct mathematically, but no scientists on the planet could possibly measure a difference as small as (10^-50) feet--that's considerably smaller than most subatomic particles.

In the fictional realm of mathematical precision, there is a precise difference between "at least 30 ft," which means T >= 30, and "more than 30 feet," which means T > 30. Those two are completely different in the fictional realm of mathematical precision, but any distinction between those two is 100% meaningless in the real physical world of measurement. Thus, the change from one to the other would be a profound mathematical difference but absolutely no difference in the real world. Thus, it entails no difference in meaning in the world of GMAT SC, which reflects the real world, not the fictional world of mathematics.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Tides typically range from three to six feet but while some [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jul 2017, 01:40
Tides typically range from three to six feet, but while some places show no tides at all, some others, such as the Bay of Fundy, have tides of at least thirty feet and more.

A. some others, such as the Bay of Fundy, have tides of at least thirty feet and more
B. the others, such as the Bay of Fundy, that have tides of more than thirty feet
--> lack of main verb.
C. others, such as the Bay of Fundy, have tides of more than thirty feet
D. those at the Bay of Fundy, which has tides of more than thirty feet
--> lack of main verb.
E. the ones at the Bay of Fundy have tides of at least thirty feet and more
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Re: Tides typically range from three to six feet but while some [#permalink]

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New post 21 Oct 2017, 23:15
some others, such as the Bay of Fundy, have tides of at least thirty feet and more.

I have a question. In Option (A) isn't there's an issue of redundancy ?

Since it say "at least thirty feet", which means 30 feet or more. So, adding "and more" at the end makes an issue of redundancy.

Some feedback on this one please.

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Re: Tides typically range from three to six feet but while some [#permalink]

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New post 21 Oct 2017, 23:49
Option C is the correct one as the phrase “more than thirty feet “ removes the awkwardness in the original sentence .Also option B,D,E change the context of the sentence .


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Tides typically range from three to six feet but while some [#permalink]

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New post 22 Oct 2017, 02:07
kunalsinghNS wrote:
some others, such as the Bay of Fundy, have tides of at least thirty feet and more.

I have a question. In Option (A) isn't there's an issue of redundancy ?

Since it say "at least thirty feet", which means 30 feet or more. So, adding "and more" at the end makes an issue of redundancy.

Some feedback on this one please.


It's already been given in an earlier post.

mikemcgarry wrote:
First of all, notice that "at least thirty feet and more" is wildly redundant. We can say either "at least thirty feet" or "thirty feet and more," but we can't combine those two. Choice (A) & (E) are automatically out.

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Tides typically range from three to six feet but while some   [#permalink] 22 Oct 2017, 02:07
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