GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 18 Jun 2019, 00:14

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

The Romans—for centuries the masters of war and politics across Europe

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

 
SC Moderator
User avatar
V
Joined: 23 Sep 2015
Posts: 1746
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
The Romans—for centuries the masters of war and politics across Europe  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Dec 2018, 05:51
1
1
2
Question 1
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 93 sessions

72% (02:53) correct 28% (03:13) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 2
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 104 sessions

42% (01:05) correct 58% (01:21) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 3
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 109 sessions

46% (01:09) correct 54% (01:27) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 4
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 99 sessions

65% (01:09) correct 35% (01:23) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

The Romans—for centuries the masters of war and politics across Europe, Northern Africa, and Asia Minor—have often been criticized for producing few original thinkers outside the realm of politics. This criticism, while in many ways true, is not without its problems. It was, after all, the conquest of Greece that provided Rome with its greatest influx of educated subjects. Admittedly, two of the great disasters in intellectual history—the murder of Archimedes and the burning of Alexandria’s library—both occurred under Rome’s watch. Nevertheless, a city that was able to conquer so much of the known world could not have been devoid of the creativity that characterizes so many other ancient empires.

Engineering is one endeavor in which the Romans showed themselves capable. Their aqueducts carried water hundreds of miles along the tops of vast arcades. Roman roads, built for the rapid deployment of troops, crisscross Europe and still form the basis of numerous modern highways that provide quick access between many major European and African cities. Indeed, a large number of these cities owe their prominence to Rome’s economic and political influence.

Many of those major cities lie far beyond Rome’s original province, and Latin-derived languages are spoken in most Southern European nations. Again a result of military influence, the popularity of Latin and its offspring is difficult to underestimate. During the centuries of ignorance and violence that followed Rome’s decline, the Latin language was the glue that held together the identity of an entire continent. While seldom spoken today, it is still studied widely, if only so that such masters of rhetoric as Cicero can be read in the original.

It is Cicero and his like who are perhaps the most overlooked legacy of Rome. While far from being a democracy, Rome did leave behind useful political tools that serve the American republic today. “Republic” itself is Latin for “the people’s business,” a notion cherished in democracies worldwide. Senators owe their name to Rome’s class of elders; Representatives owe theirs to the Tribunes who seized popular prerogatives from the Senatorial class. The veto was a Roman notion adopted by the historically aware framers of the Constitution, who often assumed pen names from the lexicon of Latin life. These accomplishments, as monumental as any highway or coliseum, remain prominent features of the Western landscape.


1. The author describes "two of the great disasters in intellectual history" in order to

A. establish a point directly related to the main argument
B. show that certain historical claims are inaccurate
C. demonstrate the importance of certain historical data
D. disprove the claims made by others with a different view
E. concede the partial accuracy of an opposing view


2. According to the passage, ancient Roman roads

A. connected places of military importance in ancient Europe
B. are engineering marvels unequaled in modern times
C. are similar in some respects to modern highways
D. were products of democratic political institutions
E. caused the development of modern European cities


3. According to the passage, which of the following accurately describes the Latin language?

I. It spread in part due to Rome's military power
II. It is reflected in some modern political concepts.
III. It is spoken today in some parts of Europe.
A. I only
B. II only
C. I and II only
D. I and III only
E. II and III only


4. It can be inferred from the passage that the framers of the Constitution

A. were familiar with certain aspects of Roman government
B. were similar to the Roman elders
C. embraced the veto as the hallmark of Roman democracy
D. overlooked Cicero's contributions to the theory of democracy
E. formed a government based on worldwide democracy


_________________
Thanks!
Do give some kudos.

Simple strategy:
“Once you’ve eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.”

Want to improve your Score:
GMAT Ninja YouTube! Series 1| GMAT Ninja YouTube! Series 2 | How to Improve GMAT Quant from Q49 to a Perfect Q51 | Time management

My Notes:
Reading comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Absolute Phrases | Subjunctive Mood
MBA Section Director
User avatar
V
Affiliations: GMATClub
Joined: 22 May 2017
Posts: 2526
GPA: 4
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: The Romans—for centuries the masters of war and politics across Europe  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Dec 2018, 23:40

+1 kudos to the posts containing answer explanations of all questions


_________________
Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 10 Mar 2016
Posts: 113
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, Real Estate
GMAT 1: 550 Q44 V23
Premium Member
Re: The Romans—for centuries the masters of war and politics across Europe  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Dec 2018, 02:41
1
1. The author describes "two of the great disasters in intellectual history" in order to

A. establish a point directly related to the main argument - opposite to the main idea
B. show that certain historical claims are inaccurate - Inconsistent
C. demonstrate the importance of certain historical data out of scope
D. disprove the claims made by others with a different view - out of scope
E. concede the partial accuracy of an opposing view - author admitted to it

2. According to the passage, ancient Roman roads

A. connected places of military importance in ancient Europe - given in 2nd para
B. are engineering marvels unequaled in modern times - out of scope
C. are similar in some respects to modern highways - out of scope
D. were products of democratic political institutions - happened at the same time, but can't conclude that political influence led it.
E. caused the development of modern European cities - out of scope

3. According to the passage, which of the following accurately describes the Latin language?

I. It spread in part due to Rome's military power - given in 3rd para
II. It is reflected in some modern political concepts.v- given in 3 rd para
III. It is spoken today in some parts of Europe. - It is not spoken. Given in the last lines of 3 rd para
A. I only
B. II only
C. I and II only
D. I and III only
E. II and III only

4. It can be inferred from the passage that the framers of the Constitution

A. were familiar with certain aspects of Roman government - as stated in the last para. 'VETO" is concluded on the basis of this.
B. were similar to the Roman elders - Inconsistent
C. embraced the veto as the hallmark of Roman democracy - Out of scope
D. overlooked Cicero's contributions to the theory of democracy - out of scope
E. formed a government based on worldwide democracy - out of scope
_________________
Please Hit Kudos if you like my post useful.
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 21 Apr 2018
Posts: 76
Location: India
GMAT 1: 650 Q49 V29
GMAT 2: 680 Q48 V35
Re: The Romans—for centuries the masters of war and politics across Europe  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Dec 2018, 03:41
Hi tapasgupta,

Could you please point out the location of the second point in the third question? I got this incorrect.
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 24 Nov 2018
Posts: 109
Location: India
GPA: 3.27
WE: General Management (Retail Banking)
Premium Member
Re: The Romans—for centuries the masters of war and politics across Europe  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Dec 2018, 03:57
1
aragonn wrote:
The Romans—for centuries the masters of war and politics across Europe, Northern Africa, and Asia Minor—have often been criticized for producing few original thinkers outside the realm of politics. This criticism, while in many ways true, is not without its problems. It was, after all, the conquest of Greece that provided Rome with its greatest influx of educated subjects. Admittedly, two of the great disasters in intellectual history—the murder of Archimedes and the burning of Alexandria’s library—both occurred under Rome’s watch. Nevertheless, a city that was able to conquer so much of the known world could not have been devoid of the creativity that characterizes so many other ancient empires.

Engineering is one endeavor in which the Romans showed themselves capable. Their aqueducts carried water hundreds of miles along the tops of vast arcades. Roman roads, built for the rapid deployment of troops, crisscross Europe and still form the basis of numerous modern highways that provide quick access between many major European and African cities. Indeed, a large number of these cities owe their prominence to Rome’s economic and political influence.

Many of those major cities lie far beyond Rome’s original province, and Latin-derived languages are spoken in most Southern European nations. Again a result of military influence, the popularity of Latin and its offspring is difficult to underestimate. During the centuries of ignorance and violence that followed Rome’s decline, the Latin language was the glue that held together the identity of an entire continent. While seldom spoken today, it is still studied widely, if only so that such masters of rhetoric as Cicero can be read in the original.

It is Cicero and his like who are perhaps the most overlooked legacy of Rome. While far from being a democracy, Rome did leave behind useful political tools that serve the American republic today. “Republic” itself is Latin for “the people’s business,” a notion cherished in democracies worldwide. Senators owe their name to Rome’s class of elders; Representatives owe theirs to the Tribunes who seized popular prerogatives from the Senatorial class. The veto was a Roman notion adopted by the historically aware framers of the Constitution, who often assumed pen names from the lexicon of Latin life. These accomplishments, as monumental as any highway or coliseum, remain prominent features of the Western landscape.

1. The author describes "two of the great disasters in intellectual history" in order to

A. establish a point directly related to the main argument
B. show that certain historical claims are inaccurate
C. demonstrate the importance of certain historical data
D. disprove the claims made by others with a different view
E. concede the partial accuracy of an opposing view


2. According to the passage, ancient Roman roads

A. connected places of military importance in ancient Europe
B. are engineering marvels unequaled in modern times
C. are similar in some respects to modern highways
D. were products of democratic political institutions
E. caused the development of modern European cities


3. According to the passage, which of the following accurately describes the Latin language?

I. It spread in part due to Rome's military power
II. It is reflected in some modern political concepts.
III. It is spoken today in some parts of Europe.
A. I only
B. II only
C. I and II only
D. I and III only
E. II and III only


4. It can be inferred from the passage that the framers of the Constitution

A. were familiar with certain aspects of Roman government
B. were similar to the Roman elders
C. embraced the veto as the hallmark of Roman democracy
D. overlooked Cicero's contributions to the theory of democracy
E. formed a government based on worldwide democracy




1) This criticism, while in many ways true, is not without its problems. It was, after all, the conquest of Greece that provided Rome with its greatest influx of educated subjects. Admittedly, two of the great disasters in intellectual history—the murder of Archimedes and the burning of Alexandria’s library—both occurred under Rome’s watch. Nevertheless

The above statement establishes that there is criticism for not producing enough original thinkers and this criticism is not entirely true since the conquest of Greece provided Rome with educated subjects who could become original thinkers. Then, an emphasis is on "Admittedly", the author admits that the certain portion of the criticism is true while citing examples. With an emphasis on "Nevertheless", the author is trying to outweigh the cited examples with more analysis done on his part. And option E states exactly that.

2) B, C & E are not stated in the second bold text above or anywhere else in the passage. Between A and D, A is the better option because the roads developed were the basis of modern highways, not similar to it. A is clearly stated in the bold text. Option A is correct.

3) The first statement is clearly implied in the bold text of the third paragraph. However, the third statement is misleading because the paragraph states that Latin Derived Languages are spoken not Latin itself. The second statement is also clear from the bold text in the fourth paragraph. Option D is correct.

4) As per paragraph, Senators are similar to Roman elders, not framers of the constitution. Eliminate B. For option C, no such implication is given. Eliminate C. Cicero and his work are overlooked legacy of Rome, not overlooked by the framers of the constitution. Eliminate D. Option E is also not implicit from the passage. Eliminate D. Option A seems perfect fit supported by the statement, "The veto was a Roman notion adopted by the historically aware framers of the Constitution, who often assumed pen names from the lexicon of Latin life. Emphasis on historically aware.

Share some Kudos if you found my explanation useful.
_________________
Kudos encourage discussions. Share it to amplify collective education!
Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 10 Mar 2016
Posts: 113
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, Real Estate
GMAT 1: 550 Q44 V23
Premium Member
Re: The Romans—for centuries the masters of war and politics across Europe  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Dec 2018, 07:59
Wonderwoman31 wrote:
Hi tapasgupta,

Could you please point out the location of the second point in the third question? I got this incorrect.


While far from being a democracy, Rome did leave behind useful political tools that serve the American republic today. “Republic” itself is Latin for “the people’s business,” a notion cherished in democracies worldwide.

From here we can conclude that Latin language is reflected in some modern political concepts.
_________________
Please Hit Kudos if you like my post useful.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
D
Joined: 24 Oct 2016
Posts: 462
GMAT 1: 670 Q46 V36
GMAT 2: 690 Q47 V38
Re: The Romans—for centuries the masters of war and politics across Europe  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Jan 2019, 08:49
aragonn wrote:
[box_out][box_in]The Romans—for centuries the masters of war and politics across Europe, Northern Africa, and Asia Minor—have often been criticized for producing few original thinkers outside the realm of politics. This criticism, while in many ways true, is not without its problems. It was, after all, the conquest of Greece that provided Rome with its greatest influx of educated subjects. Admittedly, two of the great disasters in intellectual history—the murder of Archimedes and the burning of Alexandria’s library—both occurred under Rome’s watch. Nevertheless, a city that was able to conquer so much of the known world could not have been devoid of the creativity that characterizes so many other ancient empires.

Engineering is one endeavor in which the Romans showed themselves capable. Their aqueducts carried water hundreds of miles along the tops of vast arcades. Roman roads, built for the rapid deployment of troops, crisscross Europe and still form the basis of numerous modern highways that provide quick access between many major European and African cities. Indeed, a large number of these cities owe their prominence to Rome’s economic and political influence.

Many of those major cities lie far beyond Rome’s original province, and Latin-derived languages are spoken in most Southern European nations. Again a result of military influence, the popularity of Latin and its offspring is difficult to underestimate. During the centuries of ignorance and violence that followed Rome’s decline, the Latin language was the glue that held together the identity of an entire continent. While seldom spoken today, it is still studied widely, if only so that such masters of rhetoric as Cicero can be read in the original.

It is Cicero and his like who are perhaps the most overlooked legacy of Rome. While far from being a democracy, Rome did leave behind useful political tools that serve the American republic today. “Republic” itself is Latin for “the people’s business,” a notion cherished in democracies worldwide. Senators owe their name to Rome’s class of elders; Representatives owe theirs to the Tribunes who seized popular prerogatives from the Senatorial class. The veto was a Roman notion adopted by the historically aware framers of the Constitution, who often assumed pen names from the lexicon of Latin life. These accomplishments, as monumental as any highway or coliseum, remain prominent features of the Western landscape.


Passage Map:


1) Criticism: Roman not producing few original thinkers
2) Roman engineering
3) Latin
4) Influence of Romans/Latin today
_________________

Most Comprehensive Article on How to Score a 700+ on the GMAT (NEW)
Verb Tenses Simplified



If you found my post useful,

KUDOS

are much appreciated. Giving Kudos is a great way to thank and motivate contributors, without costing you anything.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: The Romans—for centuries the masters of war and politics across Europe   [#permalink] 13 Jan 2019, 08:49
Display posts from previous: Sort by

The Romans—for centuries the masters of war and politics across Europe

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne