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When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes

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When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jan 2018, 01:04
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A
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D
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Question Stats:

58% (01:35) correct 42% (01:26) wrong based on 307 sessions

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When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, containing equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists, doubting that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of several different experimental designs.

A When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, containing equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists, doubting that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of

B
The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856), positing that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could not be ever measured, while in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" using

C
The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, but many scientists doubted that, even if this theory is true, the number could never be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin has measured the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of

D
The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" using

E
The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856), posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, although many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could be ever measured, then in the early 20th century, Perrin, measuring the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of

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Re: When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jan 2018, 12:53
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I could not choose between C and D
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Re: When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jan 2018, 17:44
Is it just me, or is it normal for this question to take 2 mins?

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Re: When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jan 2018, 17:46
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devikeerthansr wrote:
I could not choose between C and D


From my understanding, the phrase “by use of” is too wordy. Choice D corrects it.

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Re: When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jan 2018, 23:25
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C
The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, but many scientists doubted that, even if this theory is true, the number could never be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin has measured the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of The tense of the verb in the second portion of this sentence incorrectly refers to a past event by using "has measured" instead of the simple past : "measured"

D
The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured,
but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" using
The tense of the verb in the second portion of this sentence refer correctly to a past event by using the past tense: measured
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Re: When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jan 2018, 06:08
A - incorrect because of the structure of the sentence.
B - incorrect. Positing is incorrect here.
C - incorrect. The number could "never" be measured and "by the use of" is incorrect here.
D - correct.
E - incorrect. Although, then, by the use of is incorrect here.

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Re: When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes [#permalink]

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When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, containing equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists, doubting that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of several different experimental designs.

A When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, containing equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists, doubting that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of-The subject Equal volumes has no verb. Thus this option is a fragment

B
The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856), positing that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could not be ever measured, while in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" using-This choice is again a fragment because subject Amedeo has no verb.

C
The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, but many scientists doubted that, even if this theory is true, the number could never be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin has measured the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of-This choice has tense error. Perrin has measured is wrong no need of present perfect. The correct tense is simple past.

D
The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" using-Correcto !

E
The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856), posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, although many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could be ever measured, then in the early 20th century, Perrin, measuring the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of-This choice again has subject-verb agreement error. In Last sentence" Perrin measuring the value" there is no verb for subject Perrin
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Re: When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jan 2018, 12:58
devikeerthansr, problem with C is the tense in if...then... and the present perfect
syedazeem3, the question is quite long, and quite hard, it is fine to spend 2 min on this question as long as you get the right answer.
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Re: When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jan 2018, 23:30
syedazeem3 wrote:
Is it just me, or is it normal for this question to take 2 mins?

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I took < 3 mins and got it wrong. Dont be discouraged.
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Re: When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jan 2018, 04:51
devikeerthansr wrote:
I could not choose between C and D


In choice C the use of present perfect is wrong because time frame when the action happened is mentioned
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Re: When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes [#permalink]

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One way to save time on a big mess like this is to make sure that the underlying structure is sound. Only C and D are sentences at all, so we don't want to waste much time analyzing the other choices. How can we tell?

A) This one never gets off the ground. It starts with a dependent clause: "When Avogadro posited that X," and then we never have a main subject-verb pair to follow up on this.

B) This one makes Avogadro the subject, but he never gets a verb! "Positing" doesn't count because it's a modifier. Just like "The police, suspecting a trap," this option can't be a sentence until it gets a main verb.

E) Here we finally have a main subject and verb: Avogadro posited. It's wrong to put a comma between the subject and the verb, but what if we forgive that? The sentence still falls apart. "Avogadro posited that X, although many scientists doubted that Y, then Perrin, measuring the value . . . " We have three subjects--Avogadro, scientists, and Perrin--but our last subject (Perrin) never gets a verb. This option gives us a modifier and just wraps up!

That leaves us with C and D. C is a confusion of tenses. Why are we using "is" and "has been" to describe the events of over a century ago? It also says that scientists "doubted that the number could never be measured." This double negative implies that they thought the number could be measured, which doesn't make sense here.
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When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes [#permalink]

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New post 16 Feb 2018, 00:17
[quote="chesstitans"]When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, containing equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists, doubting that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of several different experimental designs.

A When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, containing equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists, doubting that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of---- 'doubting that' is not parallel to 'measured'

B
The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856), positing that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could not be ever measured, while in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" using--- 'could not ever be measured...not really makes sense!'


C
The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, but many scientists doubted that, even if this theory is true--
'If' should have 'were' with it as 'theory' is used. Reject all options that doesn't have "if--were''.
, the number could never be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin has measured the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of

D
The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" using-- Correct answer Key Takeaways: 1. 'would contain' should be there. 2. 'Doubted' to be used. 3. 'Could ever be measured'-correct usage 4. 'But' should be present as a contrast is given. 4.'using' is better.

E
The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856), posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, although many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could be ever measured, then in the early 20th century, Perrin, measuring the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of---
'Could be ever measured--wrongly used'.
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Re: When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes [#permalink]

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New post 18 Feb 2018, 21:48
A When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, containing equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists, doubting that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of - error highlighted, present continuous form is use here which is wrong.

B
The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856), positing that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could not be ever measured, while in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" using --- posited is correct since event is happening in past.

C
The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, but many scientists doubted that, even if this theory is true, the number could never be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin has measured the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of -- but is used two times here maKING IT REDUNDANT also by use of is incorrect.

D
The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" using -- correct

E
The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856), posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, although many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could be ever measured, then in the early 20th century, Perrin, measuring the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of -- although is not a great fit here also by use of is incorrect.
Re: When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes   [#permalink] 18 Feb 2018, 21:48
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