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A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children

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A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children [#permalink]

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A
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  85% (hard)

Question Stats:

43% (01:01) correct 57% (01:04) wrong based on 706 sessions

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A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children found that children of older fathers have a reduced cognitive ability and an increased chance of schizophrenia or autism when compared to children of younger fathers.

(A) of schizophrenia or autism when compared to children of younger fathers.
(B) of schizophrenia or autism as compared to children from younger fathers.
(C) of schizophrenia and autism when compared with children of younger fathers.
(D) of schizophrenia and autism when you compare it to the children of younger fathers.
(E) of schizophrenia or autism, comparing it to children from young fathers.

Debatable Question
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Last edited by Mahmud6 on 17 Sep 2017, 02:49, edited 1 time in total.
Debatable Question. So locked it.
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Re: A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children [#permalink]

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New post 19 Nov 2010, 09:27
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Re: A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children [#permalink]

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New post 19 Nov 2010, 09:52
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i picked b and turns out it is the wrong answer. the reason may be "compared to" vs. "compared with". One school of thought believes that you use "with" when the intention is to highlight a difference - that seems to be the reason why c is correct

This is, as far as I understand by searching on the internet, a matter of writing style rather than some grammar rule. Can some one point me to a GMAT prep or OG question which uses "with" vs. "to" and prefers "with" when faced with a comparison of "differences"? I'll post it here if I find an example from a GMAC source.. Thanks.
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Re: A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children [#permalink]

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Here is a prior thread on this topic: 1000-sc-compare-to-vs-compare-with-77654.html

Turns out MGMAT notes that the GMAC does not follow this "with" vs. "to" distinction

"children of younger fathers" I guess has to be parallel to "children of older fathers" --- that may narrow it down to A and C.

1. but how do you pick between "when compared to" (in A) and "when compared with" (in C) when the GMAC does not differentiate between "compared to" and "compared with"?

2. C seems to change "schizophrenia or autism" originally in A to "schizophrenia and autism" ---> doesn't this alter the meaning of the sentence to some extent?

How is C the best answer here?
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Re: A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children [#permalink]

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New post 19 Nov 2010, 10:25
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I read in some GMAT material that When two similar things are compared to show dissimilarity then 'compare with' should be used and when two different things are compared to show similarity then 'compare to' should be used.
So in this SC question, 2 similar things are compared to show dissimilarity so option C, which uses 'compare with', is correct one.
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Re: A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children [#permalink]

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New post 19 Nov 2010, 10:30
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yes - and I have stated so above - but MGMAT clearly notes that this distinction is not followed by the GMAC -- so this issue can presumably not be the clincher between 2 close options. For this test the ONLY thing that matters is what the GMAC believes is right
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Re: A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children [#permalink]

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gmat1011 wrote:
Here is a prior thread on this topic: 1000-sc-compare-to-vs-compare-with-77654.html

Turns out MGMAT notes that the GMAC does not follow this "with" vs. "to" distinction

"children of younger fathers" I guess has to be parallel to "children of older fathers" --- that may narrow it down to A and C.

1. but how do you pick between "when compared to" (in A) and "when compared with" (in C) when the GMAC does not differentiate between "compared to" and "compared with"?

2. C seems to change "schizophrenia or autism" originally in A to "schizophrenia and autism" ---> doesn't this alter the meaning of the sentence to some extent?

How is C the best answer here?



Meaning is certainly changed, can somebody please explain this futher
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Re: A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children [#permalink]

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arunrajak wrote:
I read in some GMAT material that When two similar things are compared to show dissimilarity then 'compare with' should be used and when two different things are compared to show similarity then 'compare to' should be used.
So in this SC question, 2 similar things are compared to show dissimilarity so option C, which uses 'compare with', is correct one.


I used the same logic and chose C. Does anybody have SC examples in which 'compared to' was preferred over 'compared with' when comparing two similar things?
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Re: A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children [#permalink]

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according to MGMAT - the distinction is not made by the GMAC; read here: 1000-sc-compare-to-vs-compare-with-77654.html
I have tried searching and have not found an example where 'to' > 'with' or even vice versa where the critical factor in making the decision is based on this distinction.

In the context of this particular problem I just find C changes the meaning slightly by changing the 'or' into an 'and'
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Re: A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children [#permalink]

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gmat1011 wrote:
according to MGMAT - the distinction is not made by the GMAC; read here: 1000-sc-compare-to-vs-compare-with-77654.html
I have tried searching and have not found an example where 'to' > 'with' or even vice versa where the critical factor in making the decision is based on this distinction.

In the context of this particular problem I just find C changes the meaning slightly by changing the 'or' into an 'and'


Thanks but the link is not working!
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Re: A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children [#permalink]

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Can someone explain why "and" is being used instead of "or"?
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Re: A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children [#permalink]

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1000-sc-compare-to-vs-compare-with-77654.html

i dont know i can't get it to turn blue with the hyper link --- i have posted the same link twice --- the one at the top of the page has an active hyperlink

Last edited by gmat1011 on 21 Nov 2010, 10:35, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children [#permalink]

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Here is the official explanation of this question From Verbal question bank for GMAT Winners (SC):

A glance through the choices indicates there may be a problem with the preposition following “compare.” The word “compare” should be followed by “to” when used to compare things in the metaphorical or poetic sense. It should be followed by “with” when used in the literal sense. You compare “Juli with Jill” and “her test scores with his test scores.” But you compare Jill’s temper to a storm. In the given sentence, the author is making a literal comparison between children of older fathers and children of younger fathers. So, options (A), (B), (D), and (E), can be eliminated for that reason alone. The answer, therefore, is (C).

FRANKLY SPEAKING I do not like this explanation because it does not give a true lecsicological difference between "compare with" and "compare to". As in the Official GMAT Guide editions it may be explained in a better way: "compare with" is to be used when two different things or features have to be compared, whereas "compare to" when two similar things or features have to be compared.
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Re: A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children [#permalink]

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gmat1011 wrote:
Here is a prior thread on this topic: 1000-sc-compare-to-vs-compare-with-77654.html

Turns out MGMAT notes that the GMAC does not follow this "with" vs. "to" distinction

"children of younger fathers" I guess has to be parallel to "children of older fathers" --- that may narrow it down to A and C.

1. but how do you pick between "when compared to" (in A) and "when compared with" (in C) when the GMAC does not differentiate between "compared to" and "compared with"?

2. C seems to change "schizophrenia or autism" originally in A to "schizophrenia and autism" ---> doesn't this alter the meaning of the sentence to some extent?

How is C the best answer here?


Compared to -> Used for the comparison of things which are not alike.

Example: Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?

Compared with -> Used for the comparison of things like things.
Compared with a summer’s day, it is cold outside

So here, we are comparing children of older fathers and children of young fathers -> they are like entities, so Compare with is correct

Answer C
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Re: A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children [#permalink]

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New post 04 Feb 2011, 01:19
Quick Review and Explanation:

1. Answer is C

2.Difference between 'compare to' and 'compare with'

Compare to --> Mostly used to praise someone by pointing similarities with someone else.
e.g. Ron compares his wife to the moon.

Compare with -->used for actual comparison (as we know it )
Option C.
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Re: A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children [#permalink]

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Re: A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children [#permalink]

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feruz77 wrote:
A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children found that children of older fathers have a reduced cognitive ability and an increased chance of schizophrenia or autism when compared to children of younger fathers.

(A) of schizophrenia or autism when compared to children of younger fathers.
(B) of schizophrenia or autism as compared to children from younger fathers.
(C) of schizophrenia and autism when compared with children of younger fathers.
(D) of schizophrenia and autism when you compare it to the children of younger fathers.
(E) of schizophrenia or autism, comparing it to children from young fathers.


Hey guys, I ran onto this one. I chose (A) because C and D clearly changes the authors meaning. It is first talking about Shizo OR autism and then changes to Schizo AND autism. Does anyone now what is the OA and if it is (C), then how come does the answer choice doesn't change the meaning?

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Re: A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children [#permalink]

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New post 15 Dec 2013, 20:26
jlgdr wrote:
feruz77 wrote:
A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children found that children of older fathers have a reduced cognitive ability and an increased chance of schizophrenia or autism when compared to children of younger fathers.

(A) of schizophrenia or autism when compared to children of younger fathers.
(B) of schizophrenia or autism as compared to children from younger fathers.
(C) of schizophrenia and autism when compared with children of younger fathers.
(D) of schizophrenia and autism when you compare it to the children of younger fathers.
(E) of schizophrenia or autism, comparing it to children from young fathers.


Hey guys, I ran onto this one. I chose (A) because C and D clearly changes the authors meaning. It is first talking about Shizo OR autism and then changes to Schizo AND autism. Does anyone now what is the OA and if it is (C), then how come does the answer choice doesn't change the meaning?

Very much appreciated and will provide Kudos


I agree and had a similar thought process. Bumping for further discussion.
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Re: A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2014, 00:36
Hi,

Here the clue is on the comparison.

Compared to is not a verb but a noun.

Compared with is a verb.

You need a verb here with children OF and not FROM

Answer C
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Re: A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jan 2014, 11:57
Paris75 wrote:
Hi,

Here the clue is on the comparison.

Compared to is not a verb but a noun.

Compared with is a verb.

You need a verb here with children OF and not FROM

Answer C


Yeah very well pointed out and I believe this is critical for solving but still my doubt as to whether meaning remains stands.

If someone could clarify this AND vs OR difference as valid in SC question it would be very helpful

More than sure I may run across another split such as this particular one

Cheers!
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Re: A new study of old data on roughly 30,000 U.S. children   [#permalink] 10 Jan 2014, 11:57

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