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A tree's age can be determined by counting the

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A tree's age can be determined by counting the [#permalink]

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New post 05 Apr 2015, 08:15
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A tree's age can be determined by counting the annual growth rings in its trunk. Each ring represents one year, and the ring's thickness reveals the relative amount of rainfall that year. Archaeologists successfully used annual rings to determine the relative ages of ancient tombs at Pazyryk. Each tomb was constructed from freshly cut logs, and the tombs builders were constrained by tradition to use only logs from trees growing in the sacred Pazyryk Valley.

Which one of the following, if true, contributes most to an explanation of the archaeologists' success in using annual rings to establish the relative ages of the tombs at the Pazyryk site?

(A) The Pazyryk tombs were all robbed during ancient times, but breakage of the tombs seals allowed the seepage of water, which soon froze permanently, thereby preserving the tombs' remaining artefacts.

(B) The Pazyryk Valley, surrounded by extremely high mountains, has a distinctive yearly pattern of rainfall, and so trees growing in the Pazyryk Valley have annual rings that are quite distinct from trees growing in nearby valleys.

(C) Each log in the Pazyryk tombs has among its rings a distinctive sequence of twelve annual rings representing six drought years followed by three rainy years and three more drought years.

(D) The archaeologists determined that the youngest tree used in any of the tombs was 90 years old and that the oldest tree was 450 years old.

(E) All of the Pazyryk tombs contained cultural artefacts that can be dated to roughly 2300 years ago.

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A tree's age can be determined by counting the [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jun 2015, 12:15
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souvik101990 wrote:
A tree's age can be determined by counting the annual growth rings in its trunk. Each ring represents one year, and the ring's thickness reveals the relative amount of rainfall that year. Archaeologists successfully used annual rings to determine the relative ages of ancient tombs at Pazyryk. Each tomb was constructed from freshly cut logs, and the tombs builders were constrained by tradition to use only logs from trees growing in the sacred Pazyryk Valley.

Which one of the following, if true, contributes most to an explanation of the archaeologists' success in using annual rings to establish the relative ages of the tombs at the Pazyryk site?

(A) The Pazyryk tombs were all robbed during ancient times, but breakage of the tombs seals allowed the seepage of water, which soon froze permanently, thereby preserving the tombs' remaining artefacts.

(B) The Pazyryk Valley, surrounded by extremely high mountains, has a distinctive yearly pattern of rainfall, and so trees growing in the Pazyryk Valley have annual rings that are quite distinct from trees growing in nearby valleys.

(C) Each log in the Pazyryk tombs has among its rings a distinctive sequence of twelve annual rings representing six drought years followed by three rainy years and three more drought years.

(D) The archaeologists determined that the youngest tree used in any of the tombs was 90 years old and that the oldest tree was 450 years old.

(E) All of the Pazyryk tombs contained cultural artefacts that can be dated to roughly 2300 years ago.


Question asks not about ages of tombs or logs but about relative ages of tombs.

So scientists need to know that this tomb (number 1) was build firstly and this tomb 3 year after the first tomb and so on.
They need only order of ages of buildings.

If we have sequence of rainy and drought years: 6D-3R-3D when we can analyze tombs in such way:
tomb #1 - its logs has 10 drought years - this is oldest tomb,
tomb #2 - its logs has 10 drought years + 3 rainy years - this tomb is younger than tomb#1,
tomb #3 - its logs has 10 drought years + 3 rainy years + 2 drought - this tomb is younger than tomb#2 and so on.

So answer is C.
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Re: A tree's age can be determined by counting the [#permalink]

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New post 05 Apr 2015, 12:18
A tree's age can be determined by counting the annual growth rings in its trunk. Each ring represents one year, and the ring's thickness reveals the relative amount of rainfall that year. Archaeologists successfully used annual rings to determine the relative ages of ancient tombs at Pazyryk. Each tomb was constructed from freshly cut logs, and the tombs builders were constrained by tradition to use only logs from trees growing in the sacred Pazyryk Valley.

Which one of the following, if true, contributes most to an explanation of the archaeologists' success in using annual rings to establish the relative ages of the tombs at the Pazyryk site?

(A) The Pazyryk tombs were all robbed during ancient times, but breakage of the tombs seals allowed the seepage of water, which soon froze permanently, thereby preserving the tombs' remaining artefacts --- too far off the point. question says nothing about preservation of artifacts

(B) The Pazyryk Valley, surrounded by extremely high mountains, has a distinctive yearly pattern of rainfall, and so trees growing in the Pazyryk Valley have annual rings that are quite distinct from trees growing in nearby valleys --- it only compares rings characteristics, not sufficient

(C) Each log in the Pazyryk tombs has among its rings a distinctive sequence of twelve annual rings representing six drought years followed by three rainy years and three more drought years --- distinguishing between rainy ring and drought rings is enough to calculate the logs age

(D) The archaeologists determined that the youngest tree used in any of the tombs was 90 years old and that the oldest tree was 450 years old --- not sufficient

(E) All of the Pazyryk tombs contained cultural artefacts that can be dated to roughly 2300 years ago --- irrelevant
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Re: A tree's age can be determined by counting the [#permalink]

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New post 22 May 2015, 02:42
Question is very difficult ,atleast i felt so .
I marked C because thought others are not much relevant
and C spoke something about years etc.
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Re: A tree's age can be determined by counting the [#permalink]

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New post 23 May 2015, 04:58
Option C precisely tells about how the scientists were able to determine the age based on the number of rings.

B is another option that talks about changes in rain pattern but nothing about how rings were used.

So C. :)
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A tree's age can be determined by counting the [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2015, 15:26
B seemed to be initial choice for me
But was not fully convinced with C ,until read the question again
Which one of the following, if true, contributes most to an explanation of the archaeologists' success in using annual rings to establish the relative ages of the tombs at the Pazyryk site?

C fulfills this requirement better than B
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Re: A tree's age can be determined by counting the [#permalink]

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New post 12 Aug 2015, 09:54
Harley1980 wrote:
souvik101990 wrote:
A tree's age can be determined by counting the annual growth rings in its trunk. Each ring represents one year, and the ring's thickness reveals the relative amount of rainfall that year. Archaeologists successfully used annual rings to determine the relative ages of ancient tombs at Pazyryk. Each tomb was constructed from freshly cut logs, and the tombs builders were constrained by tradition to use only logs from trees growing in the sacred Pazyryk Valley.

Which one of the following, if true, contributes most to an explanation of the archaeologists' success in using annual rings to establish the relative ages of the tombs at the Pazyryk site?

(A) The Pazyryk tombs were all robbed during ancient times, but breakage of the tombs seals allowed the seepage of water, which soon froze permanently, thereby preserving the tombs' remaining artefacts.

(B) The Pazyryk Valley, surrounded by extremely high mountains, has a distinctive yearly pattern of rainfall, and so trees growing in the Pazyryk Valley have annual rings that are quite distinct from trees growing in nearby valleys.

(C) Each log in the Pazyryk tombs has among its rings a distinctive sequence of twelve annual rings representing six drought years followed by three rainy years and three more drought years.

(D) The archaeologists determined that the youngest tree used in any of the tombs was 90 years old and that the oldest tree was 450 years old.

(E) All of the Pazyryk tombs contained cultural artefacts that can be dated to roughly 2300 years ago.


Question asks not about ages of tombs or logs but about relative ages of tombs.

So scientists need to know that this tomb (number 1) was build firstly and this tomb 3 year after the first tomb and so on.
They need only order of ages of buildings.

If we have sequence of rainy and drought years: 6D-3R-3D when we can analyze tombs in such way:
tomb #1 - its logs has 10 drought years - this is oldest tomb,
tomb #2 - its logs has 10 drought years + 3 rainy years - this tomb is younger than tomb#1,
tomb #3 - its logs has 10 drought years + 3 rainy years + 2 drought - this tomb is younger than tomb#2 and so on.

So answer is C.

Not understand ur concept...Please elaborate.... :? :?
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Re: A tree's age can be determined by counting the [#permalink]

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New post 12 Aug 2015, 10:52
I marked it B, but now i realize its C
I think what kanigmat011 mentioned "the relative age of Tombs" in the question is the catch here to go for option C.
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Re: A tree's age can be determined by counting the [#permalink]

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New post 12 Aug 2015, 12:27
rohit8865 wrote:
Harley1980 wrote:
souvik101990 wrote:
A tree's age can be determined by counting the annual growth rings in its trunk. Each ring represents one year, and the ring's thickness reveals the relative amount of rainfall that year. Archaeologists successfully used annual rings to determine the relative ages of ancient tombs at Pazyryk. Each tomb was constructed from freshly cut logs, and the tombs builders were constrained by tradition to use only logs from trees growing in the sacred Pazyryk Valley.

Which one of the following, if true, contributes most to an explanation of the archaeologists' success in using annual rings to establish the relative ages of the tombs at the Pazyryk site?

(A) The Pazyryk tombs were all robbed during ancient times, but breakage of the tombs seals allowed the seepage of water, which soon froze permanently, thereby preserving the tombs' remaining artefacts.

(B) The Pazyryk Valley, surrounded by extremely high mountains, has a distinctive yearly pattern of rainfall, and so trees growing in the Pazyryk Valley have annual rings that are quite distinct from trees growing in nearby valleys.

(C) Each log in the Pazyryk tombs has among its rings a distinctive sequence of twelve annual rings representing six drought years followed by three rainy years and three more drought years.

(D) The archaeologists determined that the youngest tree used in any of the tombs was 90 years old and that the oldest tree was 450 years old.

(E) All of the Pazyryk tombs contained cultural artefacts that can be dated to roughly 2300 years ago.


Question asks not about ages of tombs or logs but about relative ages of tombs.

So scientists need to know that this tomb (number 1) was build firstly and this tomb 3 year after the first tomb and so on.
They need only order of ages of buildings.

If we have sequence of rainy and drought years: 6D-3R-3D when we can analyze tombs in such way:
tomb #1 - its logs has 10 drought years - this is oldest tomb,
tomb #2 - its logs has 10 drought years + 3 rainy years - this tomb is younger than tomb#1,
tomb #3 - its logs has 10 drought years + 3 rainy years + 2 drought - this tomb is younger than tomb#2 and so on.

So answer is C.

Not understand ur concept...Please elaborate.... :? :?



Hello rohit8865
Could you please specify which moments exactly you did not understand?
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Re: A tree's age can be determined by counting the [#permalink]

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New post 24 Oct 2017, 09:10
6 droughts, followed by 3 Rains and 3 droughts.
Oldest will have as many number of continuous droughts.
If a log X has 7 drought ones, whereas on the other hand a second one Y has 7 droughts and 2 rainy ones. It will imply the first one is older than the second. A third Z with 7 droughts 2 rain and 2 droughts will still be younger than the first because the first probably did not survive after the 7 droughts. So, the final order is X>Y>Z.
Answer- option C.
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Re: A tree's age can be determined by counting the [#permalink]

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New post 15 Dec 2017, 22:09
souvik101990 wrote:
A tree's age can be determined by counting the annual growth rings in its trunk. Each ring represents one year, and the ring's thickness reveals the relative amount of rainfall that year. Archaeologists successfully used annual rings to determine the relative ages of ancient tombs at Pazyryk. Each tomb was constructed from freshly cut logs, and the tombs builders were constrained by tradition to use only logs from trees growing in the sacred Pazyryk Valley.

Which one of the following, if true, contributes most to an explanation of the archaeologists' success in using annual rings to establish the relative ages of the tombs at the Pazyryk site?

(A) The Pazyryk tombs were all robbed during ancient times, but breakage of the tombs seals allowed the seepage of water, which soon froze permanently, thereby preserving the tombs' remaining artefacts.

(B) The Pazyryk Valley, surrounded by extremely high mountains, has a distinctive yearly pattern of rainfall, and so trees growing in the Pazyryk Valley have annual rings that are quite distinct from trees growing in nearby valleys.

(C) Each log in the Pazyryk tombs has among its rings a distinctive sequence of twelve annual rings representing six drought years followed by three rainy years and three more drought years.

(D) The archaeologists determined that the youngest tree used in any of the tombs was 90 years old and that the oldest tree was 450 years old.

(E) All of the Pazyryk tombs contained cultural artefacts that can be dated to roughly 2300 years ago.


Perhaps the key here is the term "relative ages."

The notion of the "age" of the trees is a red herring. The archaeologist's aren't trying to determine, for example, that the tombs are 450 years old or something. They are trying to determine the relative ages of the tombs -- that is, the age of the tombs in relation to one another (which tomb is oldest, second oldest, etc.).

We want an answer choice that helps explain how they were able to use tree rings to do this. We know that the tombs used freshly cut logs and that all the trees came from the same valley.

(A) says nothing about tree rings.

(B) says the trees in the valley are distinct from other trees. It seems close, but ultimately won't help us. We already know that the tombs were made from trees in the valley.

(C) helps. If each of the trees has this distinct pattern of 6, 3, 3, then we can use that pattern to judge the relative ages of the trees, and thus the relative ages of the tombs. For example, a tree with 10 rings after the distinctive set grew to be older than a tree with only 4 rings after the distinctive set.

(D) doesn't help us determine the relative ages of the tombs.

(E) doesn't help us determine the relative ages of the tombs.
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Re: A tree's age can be determined by counting the   [#permalink] 15 Dec 2017, 22:09
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