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According to recent studies comparing the nutritional value of meat fr

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Re: According to recent studies comparing the nutritional value of meat fr  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Nov 2015, 08:33
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A. wild animals have less total fat than do livestock fed on grain and more of a kind of fat they think is --- they has no proper antecedent

B. wild animals have less total fat than livestock fed on grain and more of a kind of fat thought to be ------ the correct choice with proper comparison and with no pronoun problems

C. wild animals have less total fat than that of livestock fed on grain and have more fat of a kind thought to be --- comparison between wild animals and that of meaning ‘total fat’ is wrong

D. total fat of wild animals is less than livestock fed on grain and they have more fat of a kind thought to be -- comparison between total fat and livestock is wrong.

E. total fat is less in wild animals than that of livestock fed on grain and more of their fat is of a kind they think is --They has no referent.
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Re: According to recent studies comparing the nutritional value of meat fr  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Feb 2016, 23:10
dave785 wrote:
Compare wild animals to livestock,

C. compares wild animals (themselves) to the fat (of livestock) and is therefore wrong.

I got B. is that correct?



I think the interpretation of B is as:

Wild animal has X and Y

X= total fat & Y = livestock fed on grains.

Hence B say : Wild animals has less total fat than livestock fed grain. in this case , B is wrong.

please throw some light on it.
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Re: According to recent studies comparing the nutritional value of meat fr  [#permalink]

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New post 13 May 2016, 13:14
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robu wrote:
dave785 wrote:
Compare wild animals to livestock,

C. compares wild animals (themselves) to the fat (of livestock) and is therefore wrong.

I got B. is that correct?



but I think in B , the comparison seems between the total fat and live stock.

please clarify.


It is allowed to omit the repeated part from the second element of comparison,even verbs, if the meaning is clear.

Wild animals have less total fat than livestock fed on grain (have).

However on certain occasions this dropping of repeated element is not correct:

I love sweets more than Jina.

The above sentence can have two meanings:

I love sweets. I love Jina. But I love sweets more than I love Jina.
I love sweets. Jina love sweets. But I love sweets more than Jina does.

However such ambiguity is not there in option B, and hence the verb can be dropped since the alternative " Wild animals have less total fat than (they have) livestock fed on grain" would be senseless.
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Re: According to recent studies comparing the nutritional value of meat fr  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2016, 21:20
duttarupam wrote:
According to recent studies comparing the nutritional value of meat from wild animals and meat from domesticated animals, wild animals have less total fat than do livestock fed on grain and more of a kind of fat they think is good for cardiac health.

A. wild animals have less total fat than do livestock fed on grain and more of a kind of fat they think is

B. wild animals have less total fat than livestock fed on grain and more of a kind of fat thought to be

C. wild animals have less total fat than that of livestock fed on grain and have more fat of a kind thought to be

D. total fat of wild animals is less than livestock fed on grain and they have more fat of a kind thought to be

E. total fat is less in wild animals than that of livestock fed on grain and more of their fat is of a kind they think is

OG16 SC111



Please explain


This question tests comparison concepts.
We need to find the option that correctly compares the wild animals with the livestock or fat with fat.
On checking the options

We can remove options C and D
The options A and E contain "they" that has no clear referent.

The choice that removes all these errors is option B
Correct option: B
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Re: According to recent studies comparing the nutritional value of meat fr  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jul 2017, 02:50
1
Answer: B

According to recent studies comparing the nutritional value of meat from wild animals and meat from domesticated animals, wild animals have less total fat than do livestock fed on grain and more of a kind of fat they think is good for cardiac health.

A. wild animals have less total fat than do livestock fed on grain and more of a kind of fat they think is - They is dangling.
B. wild animals have less total fat than livestock fed on grain and more of a kind of fat thought to be - Correct comparison between animals and livestock
C. wild animals have less total fat than that of livestock fed on grain and have more fat of a kind thought to be - Wrong comparison between animal and fat
D. total fat of wild animals is less than livestock fed on grain and they have more fat of a kind thought to be - Wrong comparison between animal and fat
E. total fat is less in wild animals than that of livestock fed on grain and more of their fat is of a kind they think is - That is wrong.
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Re: QOTD: According to recent studies comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Aug 2017, 09:12
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Hi souvik101990: Is the question correct? None of the choices is making any sense?

According to recent studies comparing the nutritional value of meat from wild animals and meat from domesticated animals, wild animals have less total fat than do livestock fed on grain and more of a kind of fat they think is good for cardiac health.

A. wild animals have less total fat than do livestock fed on grain and more of a kind of fat they think is -No antecedent for they
B. wild animals have less total fat than livestock fed on grain and more of a kind of fat thought to be -This is again ambiguous comparison. Wild animals have less fat than wild animals have livestock? This is really absurd comparison. If it had been "fat than have livestock" then it would have made sense.
C. wild animals have less total fat than that of livestock fed on grain and have more fat of a kind thought to be -This makes little sense. However, "fat than have livestock" would have made more sense. "That" doesn't sound good.
D. total fat of wild animals is less than livestock fed on grain and they have more fat of a kind thought to be -Again comparison is absurd and "they" doesn't have any antecedent
E. total fat is less in wild animals than that of livestock fed on grain and more of their fat is of a kind they think is -"they" doesn't have any antecedent
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Re: QOTD: According to recent studies comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Oct 2017, 08:22
how could B be the answer , fat of wild animals is compared with livestock
it should be "WILD ANIMALS HAVE LESS TOTAL FAT THAN LIVE STOCK FED ON GRAIN HAVE "
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Re: QOTD: According to recent studies comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Oct 2017, 10:36
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Ridhimajain96 wrote:
how could B be the answer , fat of wild animals is compared with livestock
it should be "WILD ANIMALS HAVE LESS TOTAL FAT THAN LIVE STOCK FED ON GRAIN HAVE "



Hello Ridhimajain96,

I will be glad to help you out with this one. :-)

Following is the excerpt from the passage that presents the comparison in Choice B:

...wild animals have less total fat than livestock...

In the above structure, wild animals have been correctly compared to livestock.

The thing is the verb have or the helping verb do in place of have is understood after than because such omission does not lead to any ambiguity in comparison.

In total, there are three nouns in the above-mentioned structure - wild animals, livestock, and total fat. Needless to say that only the first two noun entities can be logically compared in the context of this sentence. Wild animals cannot be logically compared to total fat.

Such omissions are NOT allowed when doing so leads to ambiguous comparison.

You may go through our elaborate article named HOW FAR ELLIPSIS IS PERMISSIBLE IN COMPARISON to understand in which sentences we must use the helping verb in the second part of the comparison and in which sentence we not in the following link:

https://gmatclub.com/forum/how-far-ellipsis-is-permissible-in-comparison-148973.html


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: QOTD: According to recent studies comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Oct 2017, 10:39
karanrai1991 wrote:
I have the same question as gmatexam439



Hello karanrai1991,


May I request you to go through my response to @Ridhimajain96's post just above yours?
My response addresses your doubt.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: QOTD: According to recent studies comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Oct 2017, 10:44
egmat wrote:
karanrai1991 wrote:
I have the same question as gmatexam439



Hello karanrai1991,


May I request you to go through my response to the query posted by Ridhimajain96 just above your post?

My response addresses your doubt.

In case if you have any further doubts, do let me know.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
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Re: QOTD: According to recent studies comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Dec 2017, 12:16
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GMATNinja wrote:
Quote:
B. wild animals have less total fat than livestock fed on grain and more of a kind of fat thought to be

There’s no pronoun here, so that’s cool. And I think the meaning works: “wild animals have less total fat than livestock fed on grain” is fine. The second part seems fine, too: “wild animals have… more of a kind of fat thought to be good for cardiac health.”

I don’t see any huge issues, so let’s keep (B).

Quote:
C. wild animals have less total fat than that of livestock fed on grain and have more fat of a kind thought to be

As described in our rambling guide to the word “that”, “that” is a singular pronoun in this type of situation. In (C), I guess it has to refer to “total fat,” but that doesn’t really make sense: “wild animals have less total fat than the total fat of livestock fed on grain…”

That’s kind of a mess. Wild animals have less fat than livestock, but it wouldn’t make sense to say that “wild animals have less total fat.. than the total fat…” That comparison is thoroughly wrong. (C) is out.



Dear GMATNinja, thank you for your detailed explanation - as usual.

I think this question really troubled me. I need to revisit again and then digest what makes C wrong.

I couldn't learn what makes "that of" in the C doesn't make sense.

Finally, I tried to simplify my understanding. I changed option B and C with extremely simple language.

- I have less money than you. Ohyeah perfect!
- I have less money than money of you. As you said, kind of a mess!

Thanks for your generosity! :thumbup: :thumbup:
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Re: QOTD: According to recent studies comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jan 2018, 22:33
egmat wrote:
Ridhimajain96 wrote:
how could B be the answer , fat of wild animals is compared with livestock
it should be "WILD ANIMALS HAVE LESS TOTAL FAT THAN LIVE STOCK FED ON GRAIN HAVE "



Hello Ridhimajain96,

I will be glad to help you out with this one. :-)

Following is the excerpt from the passage that presents the comparison in Choice B:

...wild animals have less total fat than livestock...

In the above structure, wild animals have been correctly compared to livestock.

The thing is the verb have or the helping verb do in place of have is understood after than because such omission does not lead to any ambiguity in comparison.

In total, there are three nouns in the above-mentioned structure - wild animals, livestock, and total fat. Needless to say that only the first two noun entities can be logically compared in the context of this sentence. Wild animals cannot be logically compared to total fat.

Such omissions are NOT allowed when doing so leads to ambiguous comparison.

You may go through our elaborate article named HOW FAR ELLIPSIS IS PERMISSIBLE IN COMPARISON to understand in which sentences we must use the helping verb in the second part of the comparison and in which sentence we not in the following link:

https://gmatclub.com/forum/how-far-ellipsis-is-permissible-in-comparison-148973.html


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha







EGMAT

According to recent studies comparing the nutritional value of meat from wild animals and meat from domesticated animals, wild animals have less total fat than do livestock fed on grain and more of a kind of fat they think is good for cardiac health.

A. wild animals have less total fat than do livestock fed on grain and more of a kind of fat they think is
B. wild animals have less total fat than livestock fed on grain and more of a kind of fat thought to be

THIS STRUCTURE SUGGESTS THAT WILD ANIMALS HAVE TOTAL FAT AND LIVESTOCK ,BUT WILD ANIMALS HAVE TOTAL FAT LESS THAN LIVESTOCK
C. wild animals have less total fat than that of livestock fed on grain and have more fat of a kind thought to be
D. total fat of wild animals is less than livestock fed on grain and they have more fat of a kind thought to be
E. total fat is less in wild animals than that of livestock fed on grain and more of their fat is of a kind they think is


1.WILD ANIMALS HAVE LESS TOTAL FAT THAN LIVESTOCK
2.LIVESTOCK HAVE TOTAL FAT LESS THAN LIVE STOCK
3.LIVESTOCK HAVE LESS TOTAL FAT LESS THAN LIVESTOCK HAVE.
MA'AM ,CAN YOU PLEASE EXPLAIN ALL THREE COMPARISONS. THEY ARE VERY CONFUSING
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Re: QOTD: According to recent studies comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2018, 13:49
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JAIN09 wrote:


EGMAT

According to recent studies comparing the nutritional value of meat from wild animals and meat from domesticated animals, wild animals have less total fat than do livestock fed on grain and more of a kind of fat they think is good for cardiac health.

A. wild animals have less total fat than do livestock fed on grain and more of a kind of fat they think is
B. wild animals have less total fat than livestock fed on grain and more of a kind of fat thought to be

THIS STRUCTURE SUGGESTS THAT WILD ANIMALS HAVE TOTAL FAT AND LIVESTOCK ,BUT WILD ANIMALS HAVE TOTAL FAT LESS THAN LIVESTOCK
C. wild animals have less total fat than that of livestock fed on grain and have more fat of a kind thought to be
D. total fat of wild animals is less than livestock fed on grain and they have more fat of a kind thought to be
E. total fat is less in wild animals than that of livestock fed on grain and more of their fat is of a kind they think is


1.WILD ANIMALS HAVE LESS TOTAL FAT THAN LIVESTOCK
2.LIVESTOCK HAVE TOTAL FAT LESS THAN LIVE STOCK
3.LIVESTOCK HAVE LESS TOTAL FAT LESS THAN LIVESTOCK HAVE.
MA'AM ,CAN YOU PLEASE EXPLAIN ALL THREE COMPARISONS. THEY ARE VERY CONFUSING




Hello JAIN09,

I apologize for getting back to this post so late.

A. wild animals have less total fat than do livestock
B. wild animals have less total fat than livestock



Both these structures correctly present the intended comparison. The only two logical entities that can be compared in these structures are wild animals and livestock.

These structures say that wild animals and livestock both have total fat. But wild animals have less of it.

The verb do that has been used in place of have is for livestock.


C. wild animals have less total fat than that of livestock:- In this structure, the two compared entities are wild animals and that. This pronoun that has nothing to refer to logically. So essentially, we do not know what wild animals have been compared to here.


D. total fat of wild animals is less than livestock:- In this choice, total fat has been compared to livestock. This comparison does not make sense.


E. total fat is less in wild animals than that of livestock:- Here again we do not what total fat has been compared to because this choice does not use the expression X of wild animal. Hence, there is no logical antecedent for that.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: QOTD: According to recent studies comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jun 2018, 07:00
egmat wrote:
Hello JAIN09,

I apologize for getting back to this post so late.

A. wild animals have less total fat than do livestock
B. wild animals have less total fat than livestock



Both these structures correctly present the intended comparison. The only two logical entities that can be compared in these structures are wild animals and livestock.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha

Hi Shraddha
would you please elaborate further about the sentence B.
I think i must miss something, because i thought sentence B is ambiguous.
there are two ways to understand it
#1wild animals have less total fat than livestock [/i] have
#2 wild animals have less total fat than livestock [/i]

Please,
Waiting for your reply

Thanks in advance

Have a lovely day
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Re: QOTD: According to recent studies comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jun 2018, 12:05
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zoezhuyan wrote:
egmat wrote:
Hello JAIN09,

I apologize for getting back to this post so late.

A. wild animals have less total fat than do livestock
B. wild animals have less total fat than livestock



Both these structures correctly present the intended comparison. The only two logical entities that can be compared in these structures are wild animals and livestock.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha

Hi Shraddha
would you please elaborate further about the sentence B.
I think i must miss something, because i thought sentence B is ambiguous.
there are two ways to understand it
#1wild animals have less total fat than livestock [/i] have
#2 wild animals have less total fat than livestock [/i]

Please,
Waiting for your reply

Thanks in advance

Have a lovely day
>_~

Good question! It might be helpful to look at an instance of genuine ambiguity to see why the above example is different.

    I like math more than my wife.

There's two legitimate ways to interpret this sentence, one of which would be very unfortunate for the health of my marriage. :?

    1) I like math more than my wife [likes math].
    2) I like math more than [I like] my wife.

Both make sense, and because there's no way for the reader to determine what the writer meant, the GMAT wouldn't have this construction in a correct answer.

Now consider the construction in the correct answer:

    "...wild animals have less total fat than livestock fed on grain"

This isn't ambiguous. It clearly means that wild animals have less total fat than livestock fed on grain [do.]

The alternative would be that wild animals have less total fat than [they have] livestock fed on grain. No sensible reader would think that animals have livestock, or that it would be logical to compare the amount of fat an animal has to the number of livestock it possesses. So unlike the previous example, there's no real ambiguity here.

More importantly, the other four answer choices all have DEFINITE errors. We're never making our selection in a vacuum. We just want the best of the bunch.

I hope this helps!
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Re: QOTD: According to recent studies comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2018, 09:07
GMATNinja wrote:

Quote:
B. wild animals have less total fat than livestock fed on grain and more of a kind of fat thought to be

There’s no pronoun here, so that’s cool. And I think the meaning works: “wild animals have less total fat than livestock fed on grain” is fine. The second part seems fine, too: “wild animals have… more of a kind of fat thought to be good for cardiac health.”

I don’t see any huge issues, so let’s keep (B).

Quote:
C. wild animals have less total fat than that of livestock fed on grain and have more fat of a kind thought to be

As described in our rambling guide to the word “that”, “that” is a singular pronoun in this type of situation. In (C), I guess it has to refer to “total fat,” but that doesn’t really make sense: “wild animals have less total fat than the total fat of livestock fed on grain…”

That’s kind of a mess. Wild animals have less fat than livestock, but it wouldn’t make sense to say that “wild animals have less total fat.. than the total fat…” That comparison is thoroughly wrong. (C) is out.



GMATNinja egmat

My logic for this question is as follows,

In this first part of options B & C we are comparing total fat in wild animals to that in livestock. Considering this can we not think of
B - as comparing the "total fat in wild animals" to "livestock" (as in the animals)
C - the that here can refer to fat in "total fat" & this clears up the above confusion

Can you help me understand where I am wrong in the above analysis?
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Re: QOTD: According to recent studies comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2018, 10:11
lazybee wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:

Quote:
B. wild animals have less total fat than livestock fed on grain and more of a kind of fat thought to be

There’s no pronoun here, so that’s cool. And I think the meaning works: “wild animals have less total fat than livestock fed on grain” is fine. The second part seems fine, too: “wild animals have… more of a kind of fat thought to be good for cardiac health.”

I don’t see any huge issues, so let’s keep (B).

Quote:
C. wild animals have less total fat than that of livestock fed on grain and have more fat of a kind thought to be

As described in our rambling guide to the word “that”, “that” is a singular pronoun in this type of situation. In (C), I guess it has to refer to “total fat,” but that doesn’t really make sense: “wild animals have less total fat than the total fat of livestock fed on grain…”

That’s kind of a mess. Wild animals have less fat than livestock, but it wouldn’t make sense to say that “wild animals have less total fat.. than the total fat…” That comparison is thoroughly wrong. (C) is out.



GMATNinja egmat

My logic for this question is as follows,

In this first part of options B & C we are comparing total fat in wild animals to that in livestock. Considering this can we not think of
B - as comparing the "total fat in wild animals" to "livestock" (as in the animals)
C - the that here can refer to fat in "total fat" & this clears up the above confusion

Can you help me understand where I am wrong in the above analysis?

Here's a silly example: "I have a smaller house than my neighbor has." Notice that I'm comparing what I have to what my neighbor has. This seems logical.

But if I write, "I have a smaller house than that of my neighbor," and replace the pronoun "that" with its referent ("house"), I get the following: "I have a smaller house than the house of my neighbor." You probably understand what I mean, but now I'm comparing what I have to what my neighbor's house has! My neighbor's house doesn't have its own house, right?

Same idea here. If we write "wild animals have less total fat than that of livestock" and we replace "that" with "fat" we get, "Wild animals have less total fat than the fat of livestock." We want to compare what wild animals have to what livestock have, but instead we're comparing what wild animals have to what the fat of livestock has! Put another way, it sounds as though wild animals have a certain amount of fat -- and the fat of livestock has a certain amount of fat. That's just nutty.

I hope that helps!
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Re: QOTD: According to recent studies comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2018, 10:45
GMATNinja

Thanks for your reply.

Both in option B & In the example you gave "I have a smaller house than my neighbor has." Can i say that the "than" creates a parallelism effect & hence the fat/house is implied on the other side?

Also is this an elliptical clause.
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Re: QOTD: According to recent studies comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2018, 21:13
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lazybee wrote:
GMATNinja

Thanks for your reply.

Both in option B & In the example you gave "I have a smaller house than my neighbor has." Can i say that the "than" creates a parallelism effect & hence the fat/house is implied on the other side?

Also is this an elliptical clause.

Sure. Because "than" indicates a comparison, and we want to compare like elements, it's fair to think of "than" as a type of parallel marker.

"Ellipsis" is just a fancy term to refer to words in a sentence that are implied rather than stated outright. If I write, "My cat is more depressed than my neighbor's," the word "cat" is implied after "neighbor's." I wouldn't waste any brain space obsessing about ellipsis, though. I have never thought "hm, is this an instance of an ellipsis?" while taking an actual GMAT exam. Instead, my energy is focused on making sure that the sentence is clear and logical.

In the silly example I gave in the previous post, it's clear that we're comparing what I have to what my neighbor has, and that I'm comparing the size of our respective homes. Whether we label it as an "ellipsis" doesn't matter much, as long as you understand the logic of the comparison exactly as it's written.

I hope that helps!
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Re: According to recent studies comparing the nutritional value of meat fr  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Sep 2018, 10:31
We can directly eliminate A D and E as all have the word "they" and it is not referring to a plural word.

In option C the sentence " wild animals have less total fat than that of livestock" have a totally wrong comparison as that cannot refer back to Total fat.

So, option B is our answer
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Re: According to recent studies comparing the nutritional value of meat fr &nbs [#permalink] 13 Sep 2018, 10:31

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