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Before Laura Gilpin (1891-1979), few women in the history of photograp

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Before Laura Gilpin (1891-1979), few women in the history of photograp  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 31 Mar 2020, 07:38
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New Project RC Butler 2019 - Practice 2 RC Passages Everyday
Passage # 111, Date : 28-MAR-2019
This post is a part of New Project RC Butler 2019. Click here for Details


Before Laura Gilpin (1891-1979), few women in the history of photography had so devoted themselves to chronicling the landscape. Other women had photographed the land, but none can be regarded as a landscape photographer with a sustained body of work documenting the physical terrain. Anne Brigman often photographed woodlands and coastal areas, but they were generally settings for her artfully placed subjects. Dorothea Lange’s landscapes were always conceived of as counterparts to her portraits of rural women.

At the same time that Gilpin’s interest in landscape work distinguished her from most other women photographers, her approach to landscape photography set her apart from men photographers who, like Gilpin, documented the western United States. Western American landscape photography grew out of a male tradition, pioneered by photographers attached to government and commercial survey teams that went west in the 1860’s and 1870’s. These explorer-photographers documented the West that their employers wanted to see: an exotic and majestic land shaped by awesome natural forces, unpopulated and ready for American settlement. The next generation of male photographers, represented by Ansel Adams and Eliot Porter, often worked with conservationist groups rather than government agencies or commercial companies, but they nonetheless preserved the “heroic” style and maintained the role of respectful outsider peering in with reverence at a fragile natural world.

For Gilpin, by contrast, the landscape was neither an empty vista awaiting human settlement nor a jewel-like scene resisting human intrusion, but a peopled landscape with a rich history and tradition of its own, an environment that shaped and molded the lives of its inhabitants. Her photographs of the Rio Grande, for example, consistently depict the river in terms of its significance to human culture: as a source of irrigation water, a source of food for livestock, and a provider of town sites. Also instructive is Gilpin’s general avoidance of extreme close-ups of her natural subjects: for her, emblematic details could never suggest the intricacies of the interrelationship between people and nature that made the landscape a compelling subject. While it is dangerous to draw conclusions about a “feminine” way of seeing from the work of one woman, it can nonetheless be argued that Gilpin’s unique approach to landscape photography was analogous to the work of many women writers who, far more than their male counterparts, described the landscape in terms of its potential to sustain human life.

Gilpin never spoke of herself as a photographer with a feminine perspective: she eschewed any discussion of gender as it related to her work and maintained little interest in interpretations that relied on the concept of a “woman’s eye.” Thus it is ironic that her photographic evocation of a historical landscape should so clearly present a distinctively feminine approach to landscape photography.
1. Which of the following best expresses the main idea of the passage?

(A) Gilpin’s landscape photographs more accurately documented the Southwest than did the photographs of explorers and conservationists.
(B) Gilpin’s style of landscape photography substantially influenced the heroic style practiced by her male counterparts.
(C) The labeling of Gilpin’s style of landscape photography as feminine ignores important ties between it and the heroic style.
(D) Gilpin’s work exemplifies an arguably feminine style of landscape photography that contrasts with the style used by her male predecessors.
(E) Gilpin’s style was strongly influenced by the work of women writers who described the landscape in terms of its relationship to people.


2. It can be inferred from the passage that the teams (Highlighted) were most interested in which of the following aspects of the land in the western United States?

(A) Its fragility in the face of increased human intrusion
(B) Its role in shaping the lives of indigenous peoples
(C) Its potential for sustaining future settlements
(D) Its importance as an environment for rare plants and animals
(E) Its unusual vulnerability to extreme natural forces


3. The author of the passage claims that which of the following is the primary reason why Gilpin generally avoided extreme close-ups of natural subjects?

(A) Gilpin believed that pictures of natural details could not depict the interrelationship between the land and humans.
(B) Gilpin considered close-up photography to be too closely associated with her predecessors.
(C) Gilpin believed that all of her photographs should include people in them.
(D) Gilpin associated close-up techniques with photography used for commercial purposes.
(E) Gilpin feared that pictures of small details would suggest an indifference to the fragility of the land as a whole.


4. The passage suggests that a photographer who practiced the heroic style would be most likely to emphasize which of the following in a photographic series focusing on the Rio Grande?

(A) Indigenous people and their ancient customs relating to the river
(B) The exploits of navigators and explorers
(C) Unpopulated, pristine parts of the river and its surroundings
(D) Existing commercial ventures that relied heavily on the river
(E) The dams and other monumental engineering structures built on the river


5. It can be inferred from the passage that the first two generations of landscape photographers in the western United States had which of the following in common?

(A) They photographed the land as an entity that had little interaction with human culture.
(B) They advanced the philosophy that photographers should resist alliances with political or commercial groups.
(C) They were convinced that the pristine condition of the land needed to be preserved by government action.
(D) They photographed the land as a place ready for increased settlement.
(E) They photographed only those locations where humans had settled.


6. Based on the description of her works in the passage, which of the following would most likely be a subject for a photograph taken by Gilpin?

(A) A vista of a canyon still untouched by human culture
(B) A portrait of a visitor to the West against a desert backdrop
(C) A view of historic Native American dwellings carved into the side of a natural cliff
(D) A picture of artifacts from the West being transported to the eastern United States for retail sale
(E) An abstract pattern created by the shadows of clouds on the desert


7. The author of the passage mentions women writers in line 50 most likely in order to

(A) counter a widely held criticism of her argument
(B) bolster her argument that Gilpin’s style can be characterized as a feminine style
(C) suggest that Gilpin took some of her ideas for photographs from landscape descriptions by women writers
(D) clarify the interrelationship between human culture and the land that Gilpin was attempting to capture
(E) offer an analogy between photographic close-ups and literary descriptions of small details



Difficulty Level: 600

Originally posted by pathy on 08 Feb 2019, 19:38.
Last edited by SajjadAhmad on 31 Mar 2020, 07:38, edited 3 times in total.
Updated - Complete topic (731).
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Re: Before Laura Gilpin (1891-1979), few women in the history of photograp  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Feb 2019, 21:34
Got 2 incorrect(Q 6 and Q7) in 10 mins

My answers
D, C, A, C, A, A, C.

7. The author of the passage mentions women writers in line 50 most likely in order to
(A) counter a widely held criticism of her argument
Did not counter -> eliminate

(B) bolster her argument that Gilpin’s style can be characterized as a feminine style
bolster means suggest, strengthen

Lines from passage
Thus it is ironic that her photographic evocation of a historical landscape should so clearly present a distinctively feminine approach to landscape photography.

(C) suggest that Gilpin took some of her ideas for photographs from landscape descriptions by women writers
This was my initial answer

(D) clarify the interrelationship between human culture and the land that Gilpin was attempting to capture
Did not clarify anything based.

(E) offer an analogy between photographic close-ups and literary descriptions of small details
That was not an analogy.
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Re: Before Laura Gilpin (1891-1979), few women in the history of photograp  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Mar 2019, 00:16
2
all correct luckily enough.11 mins
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Re: Before Laura Gilpin (1891-1979), few women in the history of photograp  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 16 Apr 2019, 10:46
1
Hi alpacino

The answer lies in Para 2...

2 generations is mentioned only in the 2nd para.So go there.

(The next generation)
shows there are 2 generations.

the 1st generation says =exotic & unpopulated land ready to occupation.

the 2nd generation says = fragile world held with reverence.

2nd generation does not talk about occupation.Hence D isn't the answer

The 2nd generation maintained "outsider peering in with reverence at a fragile natural world" which can quite easily be assumed as not interacting with human culture.Which the both of them say.

So A

Originally posted by redskull1 on 16 Apr 2019, 07:39.
Last edited by redskull1 on 16 Apr 2019, 10:46, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Before Laura Gilpin (1891-1979), few women in the history of photograp  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jun 2019, 02:48
Took 7:15 min in total including 4:10 min to read the passage!

Passage Map:


1) Unique female photographer, Laura
2) Typical photography style of men in those days
3) Photography style of Laura & how it's unique
4) Relationship between photography style and gender
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Re: Before Laura Gilpin (1891-1979), few women in the history of photograp  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2019, 21:53
Good passage, got 5/7 correct. Can someone please explain, why (A) is the correct answer for Q.5, why can't it be (D)?
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Re: Before Laura Gilpin (1891-1979), few women in the history of photograp  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2019, 23:20
1
TeePro2018 wrote:
Good passage, got 5/7 correct. Can someone please explain, why (A) is the correct answer for Q.5, why can't it be (D)?


My approach for this question was to refer 2nd para.

Summary of 2nd para:
1. Gilpin’s approach of landscape work was different than that of her contemporaries.
2. Western American landscape photography - started with males
3. 1st team of photographers: Documented exotic and majestic land shaped by awesome natural forces, un-populated and ready for American settlement.
4. 2nd team of photographers: Maintained the role of respectful outsider peering in with reverence at a fragile natural world.

Both portions suggest that they studied the land which was not populated with nature dependence.

POE
(A) They photographed the land as an entity that had little interaction with human culture. - yes
(B) They advanced the philosophy that photographers should resist alliances with political or commercial groups. - not true. 1st group as with political/ commercial group, 2nd was with conservative. Noway in para it suggest the resistance.
(C) They were convinced that the pristine condition of the land needed to be preserved by government action. - not mentioned
(D) They photographed the land as a place ready for increased settlement. - because the 1st group was with commercial group, only the 1st group thought that. 2nd group did not think this, as it was with conservationist group.
(E) They photographed only those locations where humans had settled. - opposite.

Hope this helps.
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Re: Before Laura Gilpin (1891-1979), few women in the history of photograp  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2019, 14:05
pathy
Hello,
Can you please provide the Official Explanation for the last question?

Thank you!
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Re: Before Laura Gilpin (1891-1979), few women in the history of photograp  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Mar 2020, 01:47
Hi Experts,

Please post OE for question 5.

I really have no idea why D is incorrect?

Thank you.
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New post 31 Mar 2020, 07:30
ballest127 wrote:
Hi Experts,

Please post OE for question 5.

I really have no idea why D is incorrect?

Thank you.


Hi

The answer to question (5) comes from the second paragraph of the passage. Here's what we know:

i) The first generation of photographers:
1) were attached to government and commercial survey teams
2) went west in the 1860’s and 1870’s
3) documented the West that their employers wanted to see
- an exotic and majestic land
- shaped by awesome natural forces
- unpopulated
- ready for American settlement

ii) The second generation of photographers:
1) often worked with conservationist groups rather than government agencies or commercial companies
2) preserved the “heroic” style and maintained the role of respectful outsider peering in with reverence at a fragile natural world

We can see that the only point in common between the two is (i) - (3) - third button and (ii) - (2), both talking about the West as being unpopulated and untouched by humans.Answer option (A) captures this best. While (D) is true of the first generation, we do not know if it was true of the second generation. Hence it is to be eliminated.

Hope this helps.
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Before Laura Gilpin (1891-1979), few women in the history of photograp  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Apr 2020, 06:35
pathy wrote:
New Project RC Butler 2019 - Practice 2 RC Passages Everyday
Passage # 111, Date : 28-MAR-2019
This post is a part of New Project RC Butler 2019. Click here for Details


Before Laura Gilpin (1891-1979), few women in the history of photography had so devoted themselves to chronicling the landscape. Other women had photographed the land, but none can be regarded as a landscape photographer with a sustained body of work documenting the physical terrain. Anne Brigman often photographed woodlands and coastal areas, but they were generally settings for her artfully placed subjects. Dorothea Lange’s landscapes were always conceived of as counterparts to her portraits of rural women.

At the same time that Gilpin’s interest in landscape work distinguished her from most other women photographers, her approach to landscape photography set her apart from men photographers who, like Gilpin, documented the western United States. Western American landscape photography grew out of a male tradition, pioneered by photographers attached to government and commercial survey teams that went west in the 1860’s and 1870’s. These explorer-photographers documented the West that their employers wanted to see: an exotic and majestic land shaped by awesome natural forces, unpopulated and ready for American settlement. The next generation of male photographers, represented by Ansel Adams and Eliot Porter, often worked with conservationist groups rather than government agencies or commercial companies, but they nonetheless preserved the “heroic” style and maintained the role of respectful outsider peering in with reverence at a fragile natural world.

For Gilpin, by contrast, the landscape was neither an empty vista awaiting human settlement nor a jewel-like scene resisting human intrusion, but a peopled landscape with a rich history and tradition of its own, an environment that shaped and molded the lives of its inhabitants. Her photographs of the Rio Grande, for example, consistently depict the river in terms of its significance to human culture: as a source of irrigation water, a source of food for livestock, and a provider of town sites. Also instructive is Gilpin’s general avoidance of extreme close-ups of her natural subjects: for her, emblematic details could never suggest the intricacies of the interrelationship between people and nature that made the landscape a compelling subject. While it is dangerous to draw conclusions about a “feminine” way of seeing from the work of one woman, it can nonetheless be argued that Gilpin’s unique approach to landscape photography was analogous to the work of many women writers who, far more than their male counterparts, described the landscape in terms of its potential to sustain human life.

Gilpin never spoke of herself as a photographer with a feminine perspective: she eschewed any discussion of gender as it related to her work and maintained little interest in interpretations that relied on the concept of a “woman’s eye.” Thus it is ironic that her photographic evocation of a historical landscape should so clearly present a distinctively feminine approach to landscape photography.
1. Which of the following best expresses the main idea of the passage?

(A) Gilpin’s landscape photographs more accurately documented the Southwest than did the photographs of explorers and conservationists.
(B) Gilpin’s style of landscape photography substantially influenced the heroic style practiced by her male counterparts.
(C) The labeling of Gilpin’s style of landscape photography as feminine ignores important ties between it and the heroic style.
(D) Gilpin’s work exemplifies an arguably feminine style of landscape photography that contrasts with the style used by her male predecessors.
(E) Gilpin’s style was strongly influenced by the work of women writers who described the landscape in terms of its relationship to people.


2. It can be inferred from the passage that the teams (Highlighted) were most interested in which of the following aspects of the land in the western United States?

(A) Its fragility in the face of increased human intrusion
(B) Its role in shaping the lives of indigenous peoples
(C) Its potential for sustaining future settlements
(D) Its importance as an environment for rare plants and animals
(E) Its unusual vulnerability to extreme natural forces


3. The author of the passage claims that which of the following is the primary reason why Gilpin generally avoided extreme close-ups of natural subjects?

(A) Gilpin believed that pictures of natural details could not depict the interrelationship between the land and humans.
(B) Gilpin considered close-up photography to be too closely associated with her predecessors.
(C) Gilpin believed that all of her photographs should include people in them.
(D) Gilpin associated close-up techniques with photography used for commercial purposes.
(E) Gilpin feared that pictures of small details would suggest an indifference to the fragility of the land as a whole.


4. The passage suggests that a photographer who practiced the heroic style would be most likely to emphasize which of the following in a photographic series focusing on the Rio Grande?

(A) Indigenous people and their ancient customs relating to the river
(B) The exploits of navigators and explorers
(C) Unpopulated, pristine parts of the river and its surroundings
(D) Existing commercial ventures that relied heavily on the river
(E) The dams and other monumental engineering structures built on the river


5. It can be inferred from the passage that the first two generations of landscape photographers in the western United States had which of the following in common?

(A) They photographed the land as an entity that had little interaction with human culture.
(B) They advanced the philosophy that photographers should resist alliances with political or commercial groups.
(C) They were convinced that the pristine condition of the land needed to be preserved by government action.
(D) They photographed the land as a place ready for increased settlement.
(E) They photographed only those locations where humans had settled.


6. Based on the description of her works in the passage, which of the following would most likely be a subject for a photograph taken by Gilpin?

(A) A vista of a canyon still untouched by human culture
(B) A portrait of a visitor to the West against a desert backdrop
(C) A view of historic Native American dwellings carved into the side of a natural cliff
(D) A picture of artifacts from the West being transported to the eastern United States for retail sale
(E) An abstract pattern created by the shadows of clouds on the desert


7. The author of the passage mentions women writers in line 50 most likely in order to

(A) counter a widely held criticism of her argument
(B) bolster her argument that Gilpin’s style can be characterized as a feminine style
(C) suggest that Gilpin took some of her ideas for photographs from landscape descriptions by women writers
(D) clarify the interrelationship between human culture and the land that Gilpin was attempting to capture
(E) offer an analogy between photographic close-ups and literary descriptions of small details



Difficulty Level: 600




para1
emphasize Laura Gilpin’s devotion as well as superiority in landscape photography, as comparing to Anne Brigman and Dorothea Lange

para2
point out the uniqueness in Gilpin’s work and how its work distinguish from the other two generations of male photographers to which the author intend to introduce as following, then taking Ansel Adam and Eliot Porter for example


para3
turn the focus to the features of Gilpin’s work to form a contrast toward her male counterpart as mentioned in para2
(1) peopled landscape with a rich history and tradition of its own, an environment that shaped and molded the lives of its inhabitantsphotograph Rio Grande
(2) general avoidance of extreme close-ups of her natural subjects
(3) analogous to women writers

para4
put into question/overturn the view present in the later part of para3 that Gilpin’s work can be viewed from gender perspective as the ending of the whole passage


1. Which of the following best expresses the main idea of the passage?
(A) Gilpin’s landscape photographs more accurately documented the Southwest than did the photographs of explorers and conservationists.
….out of scope
(B) Gilpin’s style of landscape photography substantially influenced the heroic style practiced by her male counterparts.

….incorrect, in the first sentence of para3 mention that Gilpin’s works are opposite to male counterpart
(C) The labeling of Gilpin’s style of landscape photography as feminine ignores important ties between it and the heroic style.
….incorrect, though para2 indeed refer to the “heroic style”, the whole passage doesn’t mention anything about “ties between feminine and heroic style”

(D) Gilpin’s work exemplifies an arguably feminine style of landscape photography that contrasts with the style used by her male predecessors.
….correct, best fit to the main idea of the passage
contrasts with the style used by her male predecessors…para2
exemplifies an arguably feminine style of landscape photography…para3&4

(E) Gilpin’s style was strongly influenced by the work of women writers who described the landscape in terms of its relationship to people.
….incorrect, para4 overturn this view









2. It can be inferred from the passage that the teams (Highlighted) were most interested in which of the following aspects of the land in the western United States?


(A) Its fragility in the face of increased human intrusion
(B) Its role in shaping the lives of indigenous peoples
(C) Its potential for sustaining future settlements
…..correct

Western American landscape photography grew out of a male tradition, pioneered by photographers attached to government and commercial survey teams that went west in the 1860’s and 1870’s.
see sentence below:
These explorer-photographers documented the West that their employers wanted to see: an exotic and majestic land shaped by awesome natural forces, unpopulated and ready for American settlement.

(D) Its importance as an environment for rare plants and animals
(E) Its unusual vulnerability to extreme natural forces










3. The author of the passage claims that which of the following is the primary reason why Gilpin generally avoided extreme close-ups of natural subjects?



(A) Gilpin believed that pictures of natural details could not depict the interrelationship between the land and humans.
….correct, see sentence below:
Also instructive is Gilpin’s general avoidance of extreme close-ups of her natural subjects: for her, emblematic details could never suggest the intricacies of the interrelationship between people and nature that made the landscape a compelling subject.


(B) Gilpin considered close-up photography to be too closely associated with her predecessors.
(C) Gilpin believed that all of her photographs should include people in them.
(D) Gilpin associated close-up techniques with photography used for commercial purposes.
(E) Gilpin feared that pictures of small details would suggest an indifference to the fragility of the land as a whole.









4. The passage suggests that a photographer who practiced the heroic style would be most likely to emphasize which of the following in a photographic series focusing on the Rio Grande?

The next generation of male photographers, represented by Ansel Adams and Eliot Porter, often worked with conservationist groups rather than government agencies or commercial companies, but they nonetheless preserved the “heroic” style and maintained the role of respectful outsider peering in with reverence at a fragile natural world.

For Gilpin, by contrast, the landscape was neither an empty vista awaiting human settlement nor a jewel-like scene resisting human intrusion, but a peopled landscape with a rich history and tradition of its own, an environment that shaped and molded the lives of its inhabitants. Her photographs of the Rio Grande, for example, consistently depict the river in terms of its significance to human culture: as a source of irrigation water, a source of food for livestock, and a provider of town sites.

see back from para3 to para2
-para3: Gilpin, by contrast, the landscape was neither an empty vista awaiting human settlement nor a jewel-like scene resisting human intrusion, but a peopled landscape with a rich history and tradition of its own….man-made landscape
-“heroic” style: must be nature, non-manmade landscape

(A) Indigenous people and their ancient customs relating to the river
…incorrect, this choice is against “nature, non-manmade landscape”
(B) The exploits of navigators and explorers

…incorrect, against it
(C)Unpopulated, pristine parts of the river and its surroundings
….correct, best fit to the feature described in “heroic” style

(D) Existing commercial ventures that relied heavily on the river
….incorrect, see sentence below:
The next generation of male photographers, represented by Ansel Adams and Eliot Porter, often worked with conservationist groups rather than government agencies or commercial companies,
- “heroic style” only has to do with “the next generation”, but only first generation rather than next generation worked with “commercial related buildups” as mention by the passage

(E) The dams and other monumental engineering structures built on the river
…incorrect, against it










5. It can be inferred from the passage that the first two generations of landscape photographers in the western United States had which of the following in common?

see para2:
Western American landscape photography grew out of a male tradition, pioneered by photographers attached to government and commercial survey teams that went west in the 1860’s and 1870’s. These explorer-photographers documented the West that their employers wanted to see: an exotic and majestic land shaped by awesome natural forces, unpopulated and ready for American settlement.
…..we label this part as (1) first generation

The next generation of male photographers, represented by Ansel Adams and Eliot Porter, often worked with conservationist groups rather than government agencies or commercial companies, but they nonetheless preserved the “heroic” style and maintained the role of respectful outsider peering in with reverence at a fragile natural world.
…..label as (2) the next generation

and here we had to find choices with the feature that both generations cover

(A) They photographed the land as an entity that had little interaction with human culture.
…correct
see the last part of the description to each generation
part(1):
an exotic and majestic land shaped by awesome natural forces, unpopulated and ready for American settlement.
part(2):
they nonetheless preserved the “heroic” style and maintained the role of respectful outsider peering in with reverence at a fragile natural world.

(B) They advanced the philosophy that photographers should resist alliances with political or commercial groups.
…only (2), not both


(C)They were convinced that the pristine condition of the land needed to be preserved by government action.
…only (1), not both

(D) They photographed the land as a place ready for increased settlement.
…only (1), not both


(E) They photographed only those locations where humans had settled.
….this statement will violate (1) which refer specifically to “unpopulated” area










6. Based on the description of her works in the passage, which of the following would most likely be a subject for a photograph taken by Gilpin?


(A) A vista of a canyon still untouched by human culture
…..incorrect
…..this sentence correspond to para2’s male photographer
…..Gilpin, by contrast, the landscape was neither an empty vista awaiting human settlement nor a jewel-like scene resisting human intrusion, but a peopled landscape with a rich history and tradition of its own,

(B) A portrait of a visitor to the West against a desert backdrop

….incorrect
Gilpin’s work concern about “environment that shaped and molded the lives of its inhabitants”, not visitor

(C) A view of historic Native American dwellings carved into the side of a natural cliff
….correct
best fit to the sentence below:
Gilpin ….but a peopled landscape with a rich history and tradition of its own, an environment that shaped and molded the lives of its inhabitants.

(D) A picture of artifacts from the West being transported to the eastern United States for retail sale
….incorrect, the passage only concern about “nature environment and environment that shaped and molded the lives of its inhabitants”, nowhere in the passage mention about artifacts

(E) An abstract pattern created by the shadows of clouds on the desert
….incorrect

“Gilpin, by contrast, the landscape was neither an empty vista awaiting human settlement nor a jewel-like scene resisting human intrusion, but a peopled landscape with a rich history and tradition of its own……but a peopled landscape with a rich history and tradition of its own, an environment that shaped and molded the lives of its inhabitants.”, thus her work not concern only about empty nature, rather it focus on the interactive between nature environment and its inhabitant












7. The author of the passage mentions women writers in line 50 most likely in order to

While it is dangerous to draw conclusions about a “feminine” way of seeing from the work of one woman, it can nonetheless be argued that Gilpin’s unique approach to landscape photography was analogous to the work of many women writers who, far more than their male counterparts, described the landscape in terms of its potential to sustain human life.





(A) counter a widely held criticism of her argument

B) bolster her argument that Gilpin’s style can be characterized as a feminine style

…..correct
the author says ”Gilpin’s approach was analogous to many women writers” in order to strengthen her argument that Gilpin could
be considered as Feminine style

(C) suggest that Gilpin took some of her ideas for photographs from landscape descriptions by women writers

….wrong, I choose this one at first
….not took her idea from landscape descriptions by women writers…its that Gilpin’s approach was analogous to many women writers


see sentence below:
Gilpin’s unique approach to landscape photography was analogous to the work of many women writers who, far more than their male counterparts, described the landscape in terms of its potential to sustain human life.


(D) clarify the interrelationship between human culture and the land that Gilpin was attempting to capture

(E) offer an analogy between photographic close-ups and literary descriptions of small details
GMAT Club Bot
Before Laura Gilpin (1891-1979), few women in the history of photograp   [#permalink] 02 Apr 2020, 06:35
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Before Laura Gilpin (1891-1979), few women in the history of photograp

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