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Developed by Pennsylvania's Palatine Germans about 1750, they made

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Developed by Pennsylvania's Palatine Germans about 1750, they made  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2018, 12:16
sondenso wrote:
Developed by Pennsylvania's Palatine Germans about 1750, they made Conestoga wagons with high wheels capable of crossing rutted roads, muddy flats, and the nonroads of the prairie and they had a floor curved upward on either end so as to prevent cargo from shifting on steep grades.


(A) they made Conestoga wagons with high wheels capable of crossing rutted roads, muddy flats, and the nonroads of the prairie and they had a floor curved upward on either end so as to prevent

(B) they made Conestoga wagons, which had high wheels capable of crossing rutted roads, muddy flats, and the nonroads of the prairie, and floors curved upward on their ends so that they prevented

(C) Conestoga wagons, with high wheels capable of crossing rutted roads, muddy flats, and the nonroads of the prairie, and had a floor that was curved upward at both ends to prevent

(D) Conestoga wagons had high wheels capable of crossing rutted roads, muddy flats, and the nonroads of the prairie, and a floor that was curved upward at both ends to prevent

(E) Conestoga wagons had high wheels capable of crossing rutted roads, muddy flats, and the nonroads of the prairie and floors curving upward at their ends so that it prevented


Verbal Question of The Day: Day 106: Sentence Correction


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Dear moderators Bunuel,

This question needs an edit. The Question is liked to Verbal Reveiw OG 17 Qno 222 .But in VROG it reads as follows:

Developed by Pennsylvania's Palatine Germans about 1750, Conestoga wagons, with high wheels capable of crossing rutted roads, muddy flats, and the nonroads of the prairie and they had a floor curved upward on either end so as to prevent cargo from shifting on steep grades.

And below are the corresponding answer choices as mentioned in OG

(A) wagons, with high wheels capable of crossing rutted roads, muddy flats, and the nonroads of the prairie and they had a floor curved upward on either end so as to prevent

(B) wagons, with high wheels capable of crossing rutted roads, muddy flats, and the nonroads of the prairie , and with a floor that was curved upward at both ends to prevent

(C)wagons,which had high wheels capable of crossing rutted roads, muddy flats, and the nonroads of the prairie , and floors curved upward on their ends so that they prevented

(D)wagons had high wheels capable of crossing rutted roads, muddy flats, and the nonroads of the prairie, and a floor that was curved upward at both ends to prevent

(E)wagons had high wheels capable of crossing rutted roads, muddy flats, and the nonroads of the prairie and floors curving upward at their ends so that it prevented

Although, experts have discussed this question , there is a lot of learning from each OG question. Now there would be different learning from this question stem.
See all the answer choices of this question are different than posted.

Well if you see VR17 Q 222, it as as above. However should this be any other question from other oficial Guides then we need to change the link of VR-17 Q222.

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Re: Developed by Pennsylvania's Palatine Germans about 1750, they made  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Oct 2018, 18:01
GMATNinja wrote:
milomingchao wrote:
I understand D is the best option, but still have two questions.

First, when we say X has A and B, we don't use a common before B; yet the correct sentence essentially says that wagons had wheels ,(comma) and a floor.

Second, wagons is plural, but why it is followed by a singlar noun (a floor). Is wagons a collective noun here?
In terms of logic, it makes perfect sense that each wagon only has one floor, I just don't know how to interpret it in terms of grammar.

Thanks in advance if someone could help!


Excellent questions!

Typically, when we have two objects associated with the same verb, there's no reason to separate them with a comma. A simple example:

    "When my daughter had the flu, she had muscle soreness and a hacking cough."

There's comma between "muscle soreness" and a "hacking cough." But if I wanted to describe the muscle soreness, I could use commas, either to separate the modifier from the rest of the sentence or to separate elements within the modifier:

    "When my daughter had the flu, she had muscle soreness in her back, neck, and toes, and a cough."

The modifier in red makes the sentence a little harder to parse, so it makes sense to include a comma at the end of it to communicate to the reader that I've finished modifying "muscle soreness." Put another way, almost any "rule" that posits that you can't use a comma in a certain scenario can be violated by sticking in a modifier. Commas are slippery animals. But the good news is that commas are very rarely a deciding factor on the GMAT. More on that in this video.

As for the second question, the sentence is about Conestoga wagons, in general. When we're writing about a plural noun in general, it's perfectly fine to attribute a singular quality to that noun. If I write, "Dodge Vipers come equipped with a laser that makes small animals go blind," there's no confusion about whether the Dodge Vipers are all sharing one laser. It's clear that each car individually has this feature. (Note: this feature does not, and should not exist.)

But if I'm writing about a particular plural noun, the usage is a little different. For example, if I write, "The Goldstein brothers have a bike with a broken axle," I'm not suggesting that each brother has such a bike. Rather, there appears to be just one bike that the Goldstein brothers have to share. The difference is that now I'm referring to particular brothers, as opposed to the generic idea of brothers.

I hope that helps!



Hi GMATNinja, I had the same question - 'plural wagons taking up one floor', because of which I eliminated D. Now it's clear after your explanation.

However, for E, i don't find any problem with "wagons had floors" and I thought the pronoun IT could refer back to 'Curving upward', which prevents the sliding. While answering this question, I somehow exceedingly thought that 'Curving upward' is some kind of a noun phrase. Let me know why IT can't refer to 'Curving upward'? and How to go about this kind of words/phrases(which i am not sure about) if i encounter in any other questions? And, a bit off the topic - i am making this kind of subtle mistakes in SC and CR, showing too much rigor while answering questions and ending up too much time in easy ones. How to tackle this problem?
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Re: Developed by Pennsylvania's Palatine Germans about 1750, they made &nbs [#permalink] 05 Oct 2018, 18:01

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