GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 17 Oct 2019, 23:17

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 19 May 2018
Posts: 50
Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Mar 2019, 09:27
‘that have comparable size’ is needlessly wordy, when ‘of comparable size’ is perfectly correct. Get rid of the last two. B has ‘having’ at the end which makes the complete sentence incorrect with the phrase ‘that having been implicated…’ It just isn’t correct, doesn’t make sense. C uses ‘fewer’ in relation to ‘carbon dioxide’ but ‘carbon dioxide’ is a non-countable noun, like ‘ice’. So it is incorrect.



This leaves us with just A, which is the best of the bunch.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 16 Oct 2017
Posts: 53
Location: India
GPA: 4
Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Mar 2019, 06:48
GMATNinja wrote:
Quote:
(A) of comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses that have

I can’t complain about this one. “Carbon dioxide gas” is a singular, non-countable noun, so “less” works fine as a modifier. And this part is a little bit tricky, but the second part of the sentence refers to several different “gasses” – a countable, plural noun – so “fewer” is appropriate.

The phrase beginning with “that” (“that have been implicated…”) correctly modifies “other gasses.” It’s also completely fine to use the “-ing” form of the verb after “as well as.”

So I guess we’ll keep (A).

Quote:
(B) of comparable size, as well as emit far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses having

It’s a funny quirk of English: if “as well as” were changed to “and” then we’d want the verbs “burn” and “emit” to be in parallel form. But since we have “as well as”, we’re better off using “emitting”, as we did in (A).
More importantly, I can’t make any sense of the “having been” at the end of the underlined portion. For that reason, we can scrap (B).

Quote:
(C) of comparable size, and also they emit far fewer carbon dioxide and other gasses that have

You could argue that the pronoun “they” is ambiguous here, since it could refer to “diesel engines” or “gasoline engines”, but I’m not convinced: since “they” is the subject of the second clause, it can generally refer back to the subject of the first clause on the GMAT without causing any trouble.

But we definitely have a modifier problem here: “fewer carbon dioxide” doesn’t make any sense, since “carbon dioxide” is a non-countable noun, and “fewer” can only be used with countable nouns. (If you’re not clear about that concept, try counting the noun out loud: “one carbon dioxide, two carbon dioxides, three carbon dioxides…” That makes no sense at all, right? So “carbon dioxide” is non-countable.)

So (C) is gone.

Quote:
(D) that have a comparable size, and also they emit far less carbon dioxide gas and other gasses that have

The first part of the underlined portion isn’t necessarily WRONG, but it definitely isn’t great: “gasoline engines that have a comparable size” is a really crappy way to say “gasoline engines of comparable size.” I just don’t think it makes sense to use the word “have” in this context, since gasoline engines don’t really possess size.

More importantly, we have a problem with the non-countable modifier “less”, since it seems to be modifying both “carbon dioxide gas” (non-countable) and “other gasses” (countable) – and “less” can’t modify a countable noun.

So (D) is out, too.

Quote:
(E) that have a comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and other gasses having

The first part of the underlined portion suffers from the same problem as (D): “that have a comparable size” is a lousy way to say “of comparable size.” But again, I wouldn’t necessarily eliminate (E) based on that issue by itself.

The other problem is the same as in (D): “less” seems to modify “other gasses”, and that doesn’t work. Plus, I’m really not sold on the idea of using “having” to modify “gasses” at the end of the underlined portion – the version in (A) (“gasses that have…”) seems a little bit better.

In any case, (E) can be eliminated, and we’re left with (A).

Hello GMATNinja

Can you please explain the highlighted portions? I fail to understand how "burn" and "emitting" are parallel. Also, how do we make parallel sentences whenever "as well as " is present? Is it an exception to the rule of the normal parallelism?

Please help me out. Would be grateful.
CEO
CEO
User avatar
V
Joined: 15 Jul 2015
Posts: 3049
Location: India
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V169
Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 17 Jul 2019, 23:34
1
applebear wrote:
Hello GMATNinja

Can you please explain the highlighted portions? I fail to understand how "burn" and "emitting" are parallel. Also, how do we make parallel sentences whenever "as well as " is present? Is it an exception to the rule of the normal parallelism?

Please help me out. Would be grateful.
Burn and emitting are not parallel, nor do they have to be, because as well as is a preposition in that sentence, and it is followed by a gerund (the -ing form, though not all -ings are gerunds). You can take a look at some examples here and here.

Saying
Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas...

is the same (structurally) as
Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, in addition to emitting far less carbon dioxide gas...

To sum up: putting the -ing form of a verb is perfectly acceptable after as well as. This is something that you'll have to commit to memory, as the GMAT has used it in a few questions.
_________________

Originally posted by AjiteshArun on 22 Mar 2019, 09:32.
Last edited by AjiteshArun on 17 Jul 2019, 23:34, edited 1 time in total.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 16 Oct 2017
Posts: 53
Location: India
GPA: 4
Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Mar 2019, 21:06
AjiteshArun wrote:
applebear wrote:
Hello GMATNinja

Can you please explain the highlighted portions? I fail to understand how "burn" and "emitting" are parallel. Also, how do we make parallel sentences whenever "as well as " is present? Is it an exception to the rule of the normal parallelism?

Please help me out. Would be grateful.
Burn and emitting are not parallel, nor do they have to be, because as well as is a preposition in that sentence, and it is followed by a gerund (the -ing form, though not all gerunds are -ings). You can take a look at some examples here and here.

Saying
Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas...

is the same (structurally) as
Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, in addition to emitting far less carbon dioxide gas...

To sum up: putting the -ing form of a verb is perfectly acceptable after as well as. This is something that you'll have to commit to memory, as the GMAT has used it in a few questions.

Hello,

Got it! Thank you so much. Indeed very helpful. :)
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 29 Oct 2015
Posts: 225
Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 May 2019, 00:36
GMATNinja wrote:
Quote:
(A) of comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses that have

I can’t complain about this one. “Carbon dioxide gas” is a singular, non-countable noun, so “less” works fine as a modifier. And this part is a little bit tricky, but the second part of the sentence refers to several different “gasses” – a countable, plural noun – so “fewer” is appropriate.

The phrase beginning with “that” (“that have been implicated…”) correctly modifies “other gasses.” It’s also completely fine to use the “-ing” form of the verb after “as well as.”

So I guess we’ll keep (A).

Quote:
(B) of comparable size, as well as emit far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses having

It’s a funny quirk of English: if “as well as” were changed to “and” then we’d want the verbs “burn” and “emit” to be in parallel form. But since we have “as well as”, we’re better off using “emitting”, as we did in (A).

More importantly, I can’t make any sense of the “having been” at the end of the underlined portion. For that reason, we can scrap (B).

Quote:
(C) of comparable size, and also they emit far fewer carbon dioxide and other gasses that have

You could argue that the pronoun “they” is ambiguous here, since it could refer to “diesel engines” or “gasoline engines”, but I’m not convinced: since “they” is the subject of the second clause, it can generally refer back to the subject of the first clause on the GMAT without causing any trouble.

But we definitely have a modifier problem here: “fewer carbon dioxide” doesn’t make any sense, since “carbon dioxide” is a non-countable noun, and “fewer” can only be used with countable nouns. (If you’re not clear about that concept, try counting the noun out loud: “one carbon dioxide, two carbon dioxides, three carbon dioxides…” That makes no sense at all, right? So “carbon dioxide” is non-countable.)

So (C) is gone.

Quote:
(D) that have a comparable size, and also they emit far less carbon dioxide gas and other gasses that have

The first part of the underlined portion isn’t necessarily WRONG, but it definitely isn’t great: “gasoline engines that have a comparable size” is a really crappy way to say “gasoline engines of comparable size.” I just don’t think it makes sense to use the word “have” in this context, since gasoline engines don’t really possess size.

More importantly, we have a problem with the non-countable modifier “less”, since it seems to be modifying both “carbon dioxide gas” (non-countable) and “other gasses” (countable) – and “less” can’t modify a countable noun.

So (D) is out, too.

Quote:
(E) that have a comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and other gasses having

The first part of the underlined portion suffers from the same problem as (D): “that have a comparable size” is a lousy way to say “of comparable size.” But again, I wouldn’t necessarily eliminate (E) based on that issue by itself.

The other problem is the same as in (D): “less” seems to modify “other gasses”, and that doesn’t work. Plus, I’m really not sold on the idea of using “having” to modify “gasses” at the end of the underlined portion – the version in (A) (“gasses that have…”) seems a little bit better.

In any case, (E) can be eliminated, and we’re left with (A).



Option D and E in the question miss the phrase " emitting far less carbon dioxide gas " ....
Can you please look into it ?

GMATNinja VeritasKarishma
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 17 Sep 2017
Posts: 101
CAT Tests
Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 May 2019, 09:40
GMATNinja wrote:
Quote:
(A) of comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses that have

I can’t complain about this one. “Carbon dioxide gas” is a singular, non-countable noun, so “less” works fine as a modifier. And this part is a little bit tricky, but the second part of the sentence refers to several different “gasses” – a countable, plural noun – so “fewer” is appropriate.

The phrase beginning with “that” (“that have been implicated…”) correctly modifies “other gasses.” It’s also completely fine to use the “-ing” form of the verb after “as well as.”

So I guess we’ll keep (A).

Quote:
(B) of comparable size, as well as emit far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses having

It’s a funny quirk of English: if “as well as” were changed to “and” then we’d want the verbs “burn” and “emit” to be in parallel form. But since we have “as well as”, we’re better off using “emitting”, as we did in (A).

More importantly, I can’t make any sense of the “having been” at the end of the underlined portion. For that reason, we can scrap (B).

Quote:
(C) of comparable size, and also they emit far fewer carbon dioxide and other gasses that have

You could argue that the pronoun “they” is ambiguous here, since it could refer to “diesel engines” or “gasoline engines”, but I’m not convinced: since “they” is the subject of the second clause, it can generally refer back to the subject of the first clause on the GMAT without causing any trouble.

But we definitely have a modifier problem here: “fewer carbon dioxide” doesn’t make any sense, since “carbon dioxide” is a non-countable noun, and “fewer” can only be used with countable nouns. (If you’re not clear about that concept, try counting the noun out loud: “one carbon dioxide, two carbon dioxides, three carbon dioxides…” That makes no sense at all, right? So “carbon dioxide” is non-countable.)

So (C) is gone.

Quote:
(D) that have a comparable size, and also they emit far less carbon dioxide gas and other gasses that have

The first part of the underlined portion isn’t necessarily WRONG, but it definitely isn’t great: “gasoline engines that have a comparable size” is a really crappy way to say “gasoline engines of comparable size.” I just don’t think it makes sense to use the word “have” in this context, since gasoline engines don’t really possess size.

More importantly, we have a problem with the non-countable modifier “less”, since it seems to be modifying both “carbon dioxide gas” (non-countable) and “other gasses” (countable) – and “less” can’t modify a countable noun.

So (D) is out, too.

Quote:
(E) that have a comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and other gasses having

The first part of the underlined portion suffers from the same problem as (D): “that have a comparable size” is a lousy way to say “of comparable size.” But again, I wouldn’t necessarily eliminate (E) based on that issue by itself.

The other problem is the same as in (D): “less” seems to modify “other gasses”, and that doesn’t work. Plus, I’m really not sold on the idea of using “having” to modify “gasses” at the end of the underlined portion – the version in (A) (“gasses that have…”) seems a little bit better.

In any case, (E) can be eliminated, and we’re left with (A).


Hi, can you help me understand when does it make more sense to use "as well as" over "and" .I always get confuse over such small issues.
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
D
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2857
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 May 2019, 00:33
abhishek31 wrote:
Hi, can you help me understand when does it make more sense to use "as well as" over "and" .I always get confuse over such small issues.

You're not alone! Ajitesh has an excellent post explaining the grammatical difference between the terms: "as well as" functions as a prepositional phrase providing additional information, while "and" is a conjunction that must be used to connect like forms. If you're not sure whether "as well as" is correct, try substituting "in addition to" and see if the sentence still makes sense.

Consider another example to see how the two constructions differ:

    "As well as inadvertently setting the house on fire, Tim forgot to pick up his toddler from day care."

Here, "as well as" is part of a modifier. Notice that a "verb-ing" construction is part of this modifier, but we don't have "verb-ing" elsewhere. That's fine. "As well as" doesn't require parallel forms.

However, if we wished to convey a similar idea using "and" we'd have to write something like:

    "Tim set the house on fire and forgot to pick-up his toddler from day-care."

Now, because "and" is a conjunction that has to connect things that are in the same grammatical form, we use two verbs, "set" and "forgot."

The takeaway: "as well as" functions as a modifier, but "and" functions as a connector that links parallel items.

I hope that helps!
_________________
GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (we're hiring!) | GMAT Club Verbal Expert | Instagram | Blog | Bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal: RC | CR | SC

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars: Series 1: SC & CR Fundamentals | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset | Series 3: Word Problem Bootcamp + Next-Level SC & CR

SC articles & resources: How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

RC, CR, and other articles & resources: All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations: All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply? Hit the request verbal experts' reply button; be specific about your question, and tag @GMATNinja. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.
Director
Director
avatar
P
Joined: 29 Jun 2017
Posts: 931
Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 May 2019, 08:51
as well as is not only a conjunction connecting 2 similar items but also a preposition. in here, as well as is a preposition. it works as "instead of"
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 24 Apr 2019
Posts: 2
Premium Member
Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jul 2019, 00:07
Probably because I'm not native speaker, I think carbon-dioxide gas is redundant, because carbon dioxide is a kind of gas already. For that reason, I eliminated A and B....
CEO
CEO
User avatar
V
Joined: 15 Jul 2015
Posts: 3049
Location: India
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V169
Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jul 2019, 23:32
1
GengLinxiao wrote:
Probably because I'm not native speaker, I think carbon-dioxide gas is redundant, because carbon dioxide is a kind of gas already. For that reason, I eliminated A and B....
I'm sure there are others here who know much more about this than I do, but isn't dry ice nothing but carbon dioxide?
_________________
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 17 Jul 2018
Posts: 430
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Jul 2019, 10:45
tejal777 wrote:
Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses that have been implicated in global warming.


(A) of comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses that have

(B) of comparable size, as well as emit far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses having

(C) of comparable size, and also they emit far fewer carbon dioxide and other gasses that have

(D) that have a comparable size, and also they emit far fewer of the other gasses having

(E) that have a comparable size, as well as emitting far fewer of the other gasses having


https://www.nytimes.com/2001/05/27/business/it-gets-78-miles-a-gallon-but-us-snubs-diesel.html

The A2 is part of a powerful movement in Western Europe, where gasoline prices are often three times what they are in the United States. Diesel engines burn as much as 30 percent less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, and they emit far less carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, which have been implicated in global warming. After being disparaged for years because they were noisy, smelly, smoke-belching and sluggish, a new generation of much cleaner, more nimble diesel-powered cars is suddenly the height of fashion in Europe.


Verbal Question of The Day: Day 163: Sentence Correction


Subscribe to GMAT Question of the Day: E-mail | RSS
For All QOTD Questions Click Here



VeritasKarishma, please help us out here, whats up with B and A, Other solutions are not very helpful,
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
V
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 9706
Location: Pune, India
Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Jul 2019, 04:11
tejal777 wrote:
Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses that have been implicated in global warming.


(A) of comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses that have

(B) of comparable size, as well as emit far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses having

(C) of comparable size, and also they emit far fewer carbon dioxide and other gasses that have

(D) that have a comparable size, and also they emit far fewer of the other gasses having

(E) that have a comparable size, as well as emitting far fewer of the other gasses having


https://www.nytimes.com/2001/05/27/business/it-gets-78-miles-a-gallon-but-us-snubs-diesel.html

The A2 is part of a powerful movement in Western Europe, where gasoline prices are often three times what they are in the United States. Diesel engines burn as much as 30 percent less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, and they emit far less carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, which have been implicated in global warming. After being disparaged for years because they were noisy, smelly, smoke-belching and sluggish, a new generation of much cleaner, more nimble diesel-powered cars is suddenly the height of fashion in Europe.


Verbal Question of The Day: Day 163: Sentence Correction


Subscribe to GMAT Question of the Day: E-mail | RSS
For All QOTD Questions Click Here


Ds burn less fuel than Gs of comparable size (preferable to "that have a comparable size" )

"far less carbon dioxide gas" is correct, not "far fewer carbon dioxide gas". Carbon dioxide gas is uncountable and needs "less", not "fewer". (C) is out.

"far fewer of the other gasses" is correct since other gasses are countable other gasses. But you must mention carbon dioxide first to say something about "other" gases. So (D) and (E) are out.

"other gasses having been implicated" is incorrect. We need to write "other gasses that have been implicated".
"having been implicated" means they were implicated in the past but are not now. That doesn't make sense. The other gasses are still implicated. (B) is out.

(A) is fine. "and" needs parallel elements, but "as well as" does not. Hence "emitting" is not a problem.
_________________
Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 17 Jul 2018
Posts: 430
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Jul 2019, 10:22
VeritasKarishma wrote:
tejal777 wrote:
Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses that have been implicated in global warming.


(A) of comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses that have

(B) of comparable size, as well as emit far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses having

(C) of comparable size, and also they emit far fewer carbon dioxide and other gasses that have

(D) that have a comparable size, and also they emit far fewer of the other gasses having

(E) that have a comparable size, as well as emitting far fewer of the other gasses having


https://www.nytimes.com/2001/05/27/business/it-gets-78-miles-a-gallon-but-us-snubs-diesel.html

The A2 is part of a powerful movement in Western Europe, where gasoline prices are often three times what they are in the United States. Diesel engines burn as much as 30 percent less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, and they emit far less carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, which have been implicated in global warming. After being disparaged for years because they were noisy, smelly, smoke-belching and sluggish, a new generation of much cleaner, more nimble diesel-powered cars is suddenly the height of fashion in Europe.


Verbal Question of The Day: Day 163: Sentence Correction


Subscribe to GMAT Question of the Day: E-mail | RSS
For All QOTD Questions Click Here


Ds burn less fuel than Gs of comparable size (preferable to "that have a comparable size" )

"far less carbon dioxide gas" is correct, not "far fewer carbon dioxide gas". Carbon dioxide gas is uncountable and needs "less", not "fewer". (C) is out.

"far fewer of the other gasses" is correct since other gasses are countable other gasses. But you must mention carbon dioxide first to say something about "other" gases. So (D) and (E) are out.

"other gasses having been implicated" is incorrect. We need to write "other gasses that have been implicated".
"having been implicated" means they were implicated in the past but are not now. That doesn't make sense. The other gasses are still implicated. (B) is out.

(A) is fine. "and" needs parallel elements, but "as well as" does not. Hence "emitting" is not a problem.



That makes much more sense than any of the options that others explained, thank you very much, so when there's a word "Other", Do we have to watch out for a thing that we need this other from?
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
V
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 9706
Location: Pune, India
Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Aug 2019, 05:39
Businessconquerer wrote:
VeritasKarishma wrote:
tejal777 wrote:
Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses that have been implicated in global warming.


(A) of comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses that have

(B) of comparable size, as well as emit far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses having

(C) of comparable size, and also they emit far fewer carbon dioxide and other gasses that have

(D) that have a comparable size, and also they emit far fewer of the other gasses having

(E) that have a comparable size, as well as emitting far fewer of the other gasses having


https://www.nytimes.com/2001/05/27/business/it-gets-78-miles-a-gallon-but-us-snubs-diesel.html

The A2 is part of a powerful movement in Western Europe, where gasoline prices are often three times what they are in the United States. Diesel engines burn as much as 30 percent less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, and they emit far less carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, which have been implicated in global warming. After being disparaged for years because they were noisy, smelly, smoke-belching and sluggish, a new generation of much cleaner, more nimble diesel-powered cars is suddenly the height of fashion in Europe.


Verbal Question of The Day: Day 163: Sentence Correction


Subscribe to GMAT Question of the Day: E-mail | RSS
For All QOTD Questions Click Here


Ds burn less fuel than Gs of comparable size (preferable to "that have a comparable size" )

"far less carbon dioxide gas" is correct, not "far fewer carbon dioxide gas". Carbon dioxide gas is uncountable and needs "less", not "fewer". (C) is out.

"far fewer of the other gasses" is correct since other gasses are countable other gasses. But you must mention carbon dioxide first to say something about "other" gases. So (D) and (E) are out.

"other gasses having been implicated" is incorrect. We need to write "other gasses that have been implicated".
"having been implicated" means they were implicated in the past but are not now. That doesn't make sense. The other gasses are still implicated. (B) is out.

(A) is fine. "and" needs parallel elements, but "as well as" does not. Hence "emitting" is not a problem.



That makes much more sense than any of the options that others explained, thank you very much, so when there's a word "Other", Do we have to watch out for a thing that we need this other from?


Yes, when you talking about a group, "others" will mean some have been already talked about and separated from the group.

He likes Alice but resents my other friends.

He resents my other friends. - Doesn't make a lot of sense. Do we mean to say "He resents all my friends"?
_________________
Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >
Senior SC Moderator
avatar
V
Joined: 22 May 2016
Posts: 3553
Diesel engines burn as much as 30 percent less fuel  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Aug 2019, 08:43
2
MargotBat wrote:
Diesel engines burn as much as 30 percent less fuel as gasoline engines with comparable size do, and they emit far less carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, which have been determined to be contributing to global warming.
A) as gasoline engines with comparable size do, and they emit far less carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, which have been determined to be contributing

B) as gasoline engines of comparable size do, emitting far less carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, which they have determined to contribute

C) than do gasoline engines of comparable size, and they emit far less carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, which have been determined to contribute

D) than do gasoline engines of comparable size, and emitting far less carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, which have been determined as contributors

E than gasoline engines whose size is comparable, and they emit far less carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, which have been determined as contributing

MargotBat wrote:
Could I have more explanation for this one? :) thanks a lot!

MargotBat,

Meaning: Compared to gasoline engines of comparable size, diesel engines burn up to 30 percent less gas than gasoline engines burn. In addition, diesel engines emit far less carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases [than gasoline engines of comparable size emit]. These gases have been determined [identified] as contributors to global warming.

• Split #1: less . . . THAN

Correct: Diesel engines burn as much as 30 percent less fuel THAN . . . gasoline engines do.
Options A and B incorrectly say less . . . AS
Eliminate Options A and B

• Split #2: Parallelism

Correct: Diesel engines burn . . . and emit . . .

Option D incorrectly says Diesel engines burn . . . and emitting. . .
Eliminate Option D

• Split #3: Meaning

Three of these options convey the wrong or very unclear meaning.

Option E states: gasoline engines whose size is comparable? Don't let your mind fill in the details.
There's nothing to compare the size to. The size is comparable to what, exactly?
Eliminate E

Option D (already eliminated) says, "gases, which have been determined as contributors." The gases are stubborn or resolute contributors to global warming? No.
(I have been determined to find information about XYZ = I have been stubborn and persistent in my search for information about XYZ.)

Stubborn and resolute are synonyms for determined, a meaning that (D) erroneously suggests and that is different from identified [as].

Option B (already eliminated) says, "they [engines] have determined to contribute." That clause implies that the engines have decided to contribute to global warming.

The answer is C
less . . . than is correct
engines OF comparable size conveys the correct meaning
gases, which have been determined as contributors correctly indicates that the gases have been identified as contributors

OTHER ISSUES
• Phrasing

The correct phrasing is determined to contribute. Options A, D, and E use different and incorrect phrasing.

Finally, Option A says "engines with comparable size." Not correct.
Correct: engines [that are] OF comparable size.
An engine (or any thing) is not with a size.

C is correct. I hope that helps.
_________________
SC Butler has resumed! Get two SC questions to practice, whose links you can find by date, here.


Instructions for living a life. Pay attention. Be astonished. Tell about it. -- Mary Oliver
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 09 Aug 2017
Posts: 496
Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30 percent less fuel  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Aug 2019, 09:33
Does "they" refer to diesel engines because of parallelism around coordinating conjunction "and"?
Senior SC Moderator
avatar
V
Joined: 22 May 2016
Posts: 3553
Diesel engines burn as much as 30 percent less fuel  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Aug 2019, 09:44
1
gvij2017 wrote:
Does "they" refer to diesel engines because of parallelism around coordinating conjunction "and"?

Do you refer to (A)?

If so, the only logical antecedent for "they" is "diesel engines."

We know that fact in part from context and meaning, and, I suppose, in part from the sentence structure that you note.

I think context is clear. The sentence begins by noting a way in which diesel engines are better than gasoline engines. Why, logically, would the sentence then claim that a [diesel] engine that uses less gas (than does a gas engine) emit more pollution?

If the parallel verbs in two independent clauses help make that logic clearer, so much the better. :)

Hope that helps.
_________________
SC Butler has resumed! Get two SC questions to practice, whose links you can find by date, here.


Instructions for living a life. Pay attention. Be astonished. Tell about it. -- Mary Oliver
GMAT Club Bot
Diesel engines burn as much as 30 percent less fuel   [#permalink] 10 Aug 2019, 09:44

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 37 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne