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E-GMAT Scholaranium Difficulty

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New post 05 Feb 2015, 19:30
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Hey GMAT Club,

I have a question to any GMAT club member concerning the difficulty of the new E-GMAT Scholaranium questions. I'd like to say i'm pretty good at verbal as I typically average a verbal score of 40-45 with 5-9 questions wrong when taking GMATPREP or MGMAT exams, but for some reason my accuracy on these E-GMAT scholaranium questions has been quite poor. I've finished about 80 questions and my accuracy has been around 60%...particularly low in the CR section.

So my question is are these questions significantly harder than GMATPREP/MGMAT questions? I am starting to think so but was wondering if anyone else has experienced this drop off as well. In any case, this drop in accuracy has made me more determined to realize my gaps in Verbal knowledge to I can Crack the GMAT. Thanks for any responses!
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New post 06 Feb 2015, 02:20
Dear Qjones818,

I just checked the Scholaranium and found that many of our students are at 80% ability level. Their ability calculation in GMAT Prep is also similar. What is your CR ability as per GMAT Prep. Each CR question has had at least 200 attempts. Usually, we get a pretty good idea once we have 100 or more attempts on a particular question (90% confidence interval). In the skill data screen, did you see an particular area in CR in which you had to work on.

Regards,

Rajat Sadana
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New post 07 Feb 2015, 16:38
egmat wrote:
Dear Qjones818,

I just checked the Scholaranium and found that many of our students are at 80% ability level. Their ability calculation in GMAT Prep is also similar. What is your CR ability as per GMAT Prep. Each CR question has had at least 200 attempts. Usually, we get a pretty good idea once we have 100 or more attempts on a particular question (90% confidence interval). In the skill data screen, did you see an particular area in CR in which you had to work on.

Regards,

Rajat Sadana


Thanks for the reply Rajat. I took a GMATPREP exam today and did not get any CR questions incorrect but got 4 SC and 2 RC incorrect. It seems that I'm having with assumptions and weakeners, but overall i'm having difficulty with the Scholarium CR questions and have a 70~% accuracy rate for SC. Any suggestions? Thanks.
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New post 07 Feb 2015, 20:43
Dear Qjones818,

Congratulations on doing well on GMAT Prep - What did you score on the test.
If I were in your place, I would see this as an opportunity. The Scholaranium course contains super comprehensive solutions through which you can learn. If the system is telling you that you need to work on Weaken and Assumptions then you should take focus on attempting questions on these topics and attempt to learn through the solutions (for questions that you answer incorrectly).

-Rajat
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New post 02 Sep 2015, 05:06
I think I face the similar situation.
I have completed 2 set of mock test - 1 800score, 1 GMATClub - from the purchases of e-GMAT)
I score 31 and 28 respectively.

But I also perform at a substantially lower level in e-GMAT Scholaranium - <50% in both SC and CR.
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New post 02 Sep 2015, 07:06
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Yes. CR questions seems more difficult than GMATPrep or OG. This is what I felt even for Medium level eGmat questions. These questions still seems more difficult than last few questions of OG, which are generally 700+ level. However, I think this deviation is an opportunity to improve in CR. But my only question is how far they go from OG in terms of type of questions that are asked in actual GMAT as OG reflects the same type as actual GMAT.

SC is awesome in eGMAT.

RC again has more "details" questions and feels bit off from OG in terms of type. But still it is reallly good for practice, which is the purpose of eGMAT Scholarium.

Given that the Scholarium is really good for practive, My only question to Rajat is that should I be worried about how different eGMAT question are from actual GMAT or simply should focus on practicing from Scholarium?
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New post 02 Sep 2015, 08:10
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universehk wrote:
I think I face the similar situation.
I have completed 2 set of mock test - 1 800score, 1 GMATClub - from the purchases of e-GMAT)
I score 31 and 28 respectively.

But I also perform at a substantially lower level in e-GMAT Scholaranium - <50% in both SC and CR.


I agree with popov 's points.

I used scholaranium extensively before my 3rd attempt (you can read the debrief, link in my signatures). SC and CR are comparable to GMAT. Difficult CR probably a bit trickier than GMAT. RC questions not so much. Questions for RC seem to have "forced" options and do miss the subtleties of GMAT. But good practice though. I believe I got a verbal ability of 72 4-5 days before my actual GMAT. Interestingly, I scored V41 and V42 in GMATPREP #1 and #3 CATs in the next 2 days so was a bit surprised by how are ability quizzes are calculated. Adding to this confusion was my actual GMAT score of V44 (98 percentile) 4 days after the ability quiz results.

I would thus say that make sure you analyse the scholaranium SC and CR questions completely but for RC, stick to OGs and GMATPREP question bank 1. Question bank 1 has 180 verbal questions that are representative of the language and difficulty that you will get in actual GMAT.
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New post 02 Sep 2015, 08:36
Engr2012 wrote:
universehk wrote:
I think I face the similar situation.
I have completed 2 set of mock test - 1 800score, 1 GMATClub - from the purchases of e-GMAT)
I score 31 and 28 respectively.

But I also perform at a substantially lower level in e-GMAT Scholaranium - <50% in both SC and CR.


I agree with popov 's points.

I used scholaranium extensively before my 3rd attempt (you can read the debrief, link in my signatures). SC and CR are comparable to GMAT. Difficult CR probably a bit trickier than GMAT. RC questions not so much. Questions for RC seem to have "forced" options and do miss the subtleties of GMAT. But good practice though. I believe I got a verbal ability of 72 4-5 days before my actual GMAT. Interestingly, I scored V41 and V42 in GMATPREP #1 and #3 CATs in the next 2 days so was a bit surprised by how are ability quizzes are calculated. Adding to this confusion was my actual GMAT score of V44 (98 percentile) 4 days after the ability quiz results.

I would thus say that make sure you analyse the scholaranium SC and CR questions completely but for RC, stick to OGs and GMATPREP question bank 1. Question bank 1 has 180 verbal questions that are representative of the language and difficulty that you will get in actual GMAT.



Your ability score, according to eGmat, would have "ideally" translated to V37 as per their calculation method. Its good to know that you actually got V44 instead - helps in boosting my confidence ;) Plus you have jumped from V34 in GMAT2 to V44 in GMAT3, which is again a booster for me, as I stand here with V34 as of today.

Based on your experience with Scholaranium, would you advice taking individual SC, RC, CR ability quizzes or Verbal ability quizzes. I have exhausted GMATPrep tests. I gave one today, which had lot of CR repeat question, and scored V44. Similarly, I am out of other tests. So what would you advice - section-wise ability test or verbal ability test from Scholaranium? I have hardly 10 days left for actual exam.
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New post 02 Sep 2015, 08:44
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popov wrote:
Engr2012 wrote:
universehk wrote:
I think I face the similar situation.
I have completed 2 set of mock test - 1 800score, 1 GMATClub - from the purchases of e-GMAT)
I score 31 and 28 respectively.

But I also perform at a substantially lower level in e-GMAT Scholaranium - <50% in both SC and CR.


I agree with popov 's points.

I used scholaranium extensively before my 3rd attempt (you can read the debrief, link in my signatures). SC and CR are comparable to GMAT. Difficult CR probably a bit trickier than GMAT. RC questions not so much. Questions for RC seem to have "forced" options and do miss the subtleties of GMAT. But good practice though. I believe I got a verbal ability of 72 4-5 days before my actual GMAT. Interestingly, I scored V41 and V42 in GMATPREP #1 and #3 CATs in the next 2 days so was a bit surprised by how are ability quizzes are calculated. Adding to this confusion was my actual GMAT score of V44 (98 percentile) 4 days after the ability quiz results.

I would thus say that make sure you analyse the scholaranium SC and CR questions completely but for RC, stick to OGs and GMATPREP question bank 1. Question bank 1 has 180 verbal questions that are representative of the language and difficulty that you will get in actual GMAT.



Your ability score, according to eGmat, would have "ideally" translated to V37 as per their calculation method. Its good to know that you actually got V44 instead - helps in boosting my confidence ;) Plus you have jumped from V34 in GMAT2 to V44 in GMAT3, which is again a booster for me, as I stand here with V34 as of today.

Based on your experience with Scholaranium, would you advice taking individual SC, RC, CR ability quizzes or Verbal ability quizzes. I have exhausted GMATPrep tests. I gave one today, which had lot of CR repeat question, and scored V44. Similarly, I am out of other tests. So what would you advice - section-wise ability test or verbal ability test from Scholaranium?


Strange thing was that I had 6 incorrect out of 30 and all of them were hard. So getting a 72 didnt make sense. Anyhow it is always good practice when you practice full sets or almost full sets (in scholaranium you get 36 questions to be solved in 70 minutes, so a good practice for actual thing as you need to solve 41 questions in 75 minutes).

I stopped taking individual sections once I reached 80-90 ability in SC and CR. I redid a couple of individual ability quizzes to make sure that I did not fall for the same traps. This was an important step for me.

Additionally, download GMATPREP collection from all-gmatprep-questions-verbal-quant-194907.html#p1503956 and solve the questions. There is no susbtitute for official questions. Again, you can time yourself for sets of 37 and 41 questions respectively for Q and V sections. This way you will get timed mini mocks.

Also, purchase GMATPREP question bank 1 from http://www.mba.com/global/store/store-c ... ack-1.aspx

Again, create mini mocks by following the instructions mentioned in http://www.gmatquantum.com/faq/gmatprep ... -of-t.html

All the best.
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New post 02 Sep 2015, 10:43
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Guys, when you think about using Scholaranium, you have to understand The Intent with which the tool is created. The primary purpose of the tool is to provide you your individual sectional abilities. This means, that as soon as you finish studying for one particular section, you get a realistic evaluation of your abilities. The tool does exceptionally well in this regard. We have hundreds of score reports. Note, our goal is to be within 10 percentile points of accuracy and for 80%+ of the data points that we have, we are within 7 percentile.

Now, you may say (especially those of you who are engineers) why not aim for a better match. Quite simply, because you cannot. Even GMAC says that your performance on the test day can vary as much as 28 points. This variation is due to external factors such as your mental state of mind, a match up between your individual strengths and the kind of questions that you get on the GMAT.

Let me give you a few examples of the latter, which is also an illustration of the extent to which luck plays a role.

Take a look at this debrief: from-a-zero-to-710-to-770-my-journey-in-achieving-the-unexpected-203223.html

This student – Anuj – scored V35 in his first attempt and V44 during his second attempt. During his first attempt (V35) Anuj received 4 passages – all in humanities – an area that he is not so comfortable with. However, in his second attempt, he received 4 science passages, and was able to breeze through them. Now, had he scored V44 in his second attempt or V35 in his first attempt had the sequence of nature of passages been reversed – probably not. Does it mean that GMAT is inaccurate in how it evaluates individuals? Not a lot? Is it Absolutely Precise – No.

Take a look at his video interview here: https://e-gmat.wistia.com/medias/dnh1fg5yto

The second case is even more baffling. Attached (below) is the score report of a student who scored V34 despite scoring 0 percentile (yes Zero percentile) on Reading Comprehension. There is a school of thought that says that you must do well in RC to score 700 (see one of Sandeep Gupta’s promotional videos). Here is evidence of someone doing not poorly but pathetically (actually it’s a degree lower than pathetic since you cannot go lower) and still scoring 700.

Image

What should you infer from these data points?

My reason for citing these examples is not to state that the GMAT is an imprecise exam. In fact, it is one of the most accurate tests of your corresponding ability. My intent is purely to illustrate that there are outliers in every scenario and it’s very dangerous to generalize outliers. Imagine, someone inferring from the score report above that you don’t need to study RC to score a V34. I can tell you that 95 out of 100 times, you will not be able to replicate the performance.

@Engr – your case more of an exception than a norm and using the reasons above (especially after looking at Anuj’s case) you should be able to justify the same.
Similarly, we have examples of students who have scored 78 percentile in ability quizzes and have not been able to score as much on the real test.

I understand that it’s very tempting to generalize using anecdotal scenarios, but doing so is very dangerous, potentially catastrophic. Generalizations should be made based on representative samples and in our case, the samples include thousands of data points. Just to tell you the extent of the # of data points – We will get ~2M page views this month which is comparable what GMAT Club receives on the Verbal and Quant forums. This is despite the fact that 80% of our content is videos and videos only register a single PageView (even though each of our video is about 10 page views). Now lets look at some of your other statements:


Quote:
Strange thing was that I had 6 incorrect out of 30 and all of them were hard. So getting a 72 didn’t make sense.


Actually this makes complete sense. Let’s see why – First of all, you made mistakes in all hard questions and since you are a bright guy, it tells you that
a) the classification of question is precise and
b) the six questions that you got wrong probably indicated a couple of areas that you were weak in.

Now, would you get 6 questions from those areas on the actual test – Probably Not. Did it illustrate a worst case scenario – probably yes.

Similarly, in your case, you score a V41, V42 before your test, indicating that you are constantly improving and that you Peaked on the test. (Good for you :) )

Quote:
I stopped taking individual sections once I reached 80-90 ability in SC and CR. I redid a couple of individual ability quizzes to make sure that I did not fall for the same traps. This was an important step for me.


This is Absolutely Perfect. This was the original intent of the tool and illustrates how the tool should be used. Note, you used the tool to reach to a point and then maintain your performance. Really Good Use.


Your Advice – Skip Scholaranium and focus on GMAT Prep


Quote:
Additionally, download GMATPREP collection from all-gmatprep-questions-verbal-quant-194907.html#p1503956 and solve the questions. There is no susbtitute for official questions. Again, you can time yourself for sets of 37 and 41 questions respectively for Q and V sections. This way you will get timed mini mocks.


Your advice can be misconstrued. Here is why – Most People will read this and completely skip Scholaranium. Remember, you did this only after you reached 80% to 90% ability in each of the sections. Most students will not take this into context while applying the above (trust me when I say that. We respond to 150 emails every day and see such examples).


Secondly, while you may create mini mocks based on GMAT Prep, you cannot ensure that those mini mocks have questions that are representative of the set of questions (read the breath of topics) that you are likely to see on the GMAT. In the scenario that you have outlined, there is no way to prevent GMAT Prep from serving all Assumption and Strengthen questions in one of the mocks. In that case, will your accuracy be representative at all. Will you be able to track your improvement from one mini mock to another? Remember a lot of work goes in designing an ability quiz. You cannot simply put in a set of questions in a bucket, stir it and replace an ability quiz.


You Must Practice GMAT Prep questions but remember, these questions do not come with detailed solutions. Hence, they offer limited “Repeatable and Avoidable learning”. Repeatable and Avoidable learning points to learning that you can apply in other questions and mistakes that can avoid. While you may google for good solutions, you will not find those solutions outlined in a step by step methodical process.


Bottom Line


Understand that the original intent of Scholaranium is to help you reach 80% to 90% sectional abilities and maintain the same. Use the Original questions, Amazing solutions, and the Rich analytics for the same. Try GMAT Prep questions once you get there.

Are some of the questions slightly more difficult – Yes. Yes, but ever so slightly. This has been designed to ensure the consistency in your GMAT Prep results. Think of Scholaranium as equivalent to Army training. Is it a bit more difficult than the real battle – YES. Does it ensure that you do well on the BATTLE – YOU BET.
Lastly – Scholarnaium is a Mock Test Preparation Tool, not a Mock Test Replacement Tool. It’s helps improve your score a lot faster and ensures that it stays there consistently.

This is one reason why you see very few students saying that they scored well on Scholaranium Ability quizzes yet did not do well on the test – Very few compared to the number of students who say that they did well on GMAT Prep or other mocks but could not replicate the performance on the real GMAT.

I hope the above helps.

-Rajat Sadana
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New post 02 Sep 2015, 10:53
One more thing - the original poster of this thread - Qjones818 scored a V39 in his actual exam on March 13. Take a look at his debrief.

from-580-to-580-to-710-if-i-can-do-it-you-can-too-194557.html#p1500048

If you read the post, you will notice that the same student indicated that he was in the V41 to V44 range on 5th Feb - 35 days prior to the test. Considering his final score, we can probably conclude (though with some uncertainty) that this student was not at V44 a month before the test.

just wanted to add another data point.

-Rajat
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New post 02 Sep 2015, 11:02
1
2
egmat wrote:
Guys, when you think about using Scholaranium, you have to understand The Intent with which the tool is created. The primary purpose of the tool is to provide you your individual sectional abilities. This means, that as soon as you finish studying for one particular section, you get a realistic evaluation of your abilities. The tool does exceptionally well in this regard. We have hundreds of score reports. Note, our goal is to be within 10 percentile points of accuracy and for 80%+ of the data points that we have, we are within 7 percentile.

Now, you may say (especially those of you who are engineers) why not aim for a better match. Quite simply, because you cannot. Even GMAC says that your performance on the test day can vary as much as 28 points. This variation is due to external factors such as your mental state of mind, a match up between your individual strengths and the kind of questions that you get on the GMAT.

Let me give you a few examples of the latter, which is also an illustration of the extent to which luck plays a role.

Take a look at this debrief: from-a-zero-to-710-to-770-my-journey-in-achieving-the-unexpected-203223.html

This student – Anuj – scored V35 in his first attempt and V44 during his second attempt. During his first attempt (V35) Anuj received 4 passages – all in humanities – an area that he is not so comfortable with. However, in his second attempt, he received 4 science passages, and was able to breeze through them. Now, had he scored V44 in his second attempt or V35 in his first attempt had the sequence of nature of passages been reversed – probably not. Does it mean that GMAT is inaccurate in how it evaluates individuals? Not a lot? Is it Absolutely Precise – No.

Take a look at his video interview here: https://e-gmat.wistia.com/medias/dnh1fg5yto

The second case is even more baffling. Attached (below) is the score report of a student who scored V34 despite scoring 0 percentile (yes Zero percentile) on Reading Comprehension. There is a school of thought that says that you must do well in RC to score 700 (see one of Sandeep Gupta’s promotional videos). Here is evidence of someone doing not poorly but pathetically (actually it’s a degree lower than pathetic since you cannot go lower) and still scoring 700.

Image

What should you infer from these data points?

My reason for citing these examples is not to state that the GMAT is an imprecise exam. In fact, it is one of the most accurate tests of your corresponding ability. My intent is purely to illustrate that there are outliers in every scenario and it’s very dangerous to generalize outliers. Imagine, someone inferring from the score report above that you don’t need to study RC to score a V34. I can tell you that 95 out of 100 times, you will not be able to replicate the performance.

@Engr – your case more of an exception than a norm and using the reasons above (especially after looking at Anuj’s case) you should be able to justify the same.
Similarly, we have examples of students who have scored 78 percentile in ability quizzes and have not been able to score as much on the real test.

I understand that it’s very tempting to generalize using anecdotal scenarios, but doing so is very dangerous, potentially catastrophic. Generalizations should be made based on representative samples and in our case, the samples include thousands of data points. Just to tell you the extent of the # of data points – We will get ~2M page views this month which is comparable what GMAT Club receives on the Verbal and Quant forums. This is despite the fact that 80% of our content is videos and videos only register a single PageView (even though each of our video is about 10 page views). Now lets look at some of your other statements:


Quote:
Strange thing was that I had 6 incorrect out of 30 and all of them were hard. So getting a 72 didn’t make sense.


Actually this makes complete sense. Let’s see why – First of all, you made mistakes in all hard questions and since you are a bright guy, it tells you that
a) the classification of question is precise and
b) the six questions that you got wrong probably indicated a couple of areas that you were weak in.

Now, would you get 6 questions from those areas on the actual test – Probably Not. Did it illustrate a worst case scenario – probably yes.

Similarly, in your case, you score a V41, V42 before your test, indicating that you are constantly improving and that you Peaked on the test. (Good for you :) )

Quote:
I stopped taking individual sections once I reached 80-90 ability in SC and CR. I redid a couple of individual ability quizzes to make sure that I did not fall for the same traps. This was an important step for me.


This is Absolutely Perfect. This was the original intent of the tool and illustrates how the tool should be used. Note, you used the tool to reach to a point and then maintain your performance. Really Good Use.


Your Advice – Skip Scholaranium and focus on GMAT Prep


Quote:
Additionally, download GMATPREP collection from all-gmatprep-questions-verbal-quant-194907.html#p1503956 and solve the questions. There is no susbtitute for official questions. Again, you can time yourself for sets of 37 and 41 questions respectively for Q and V sections. This way you will get timed mini mocks.


Your advice can be misconstrued. Here is why – Most People will read this and completely skip Scholaranium. Remember, you did this only after you reached 80% to 90% ability in each of the sections. Most students will not take this into context while applying the above (trust me when I say that. We respond to 150 emails every day and see such examples).


Secondly, while you may create mini mocks based on GMAT Prep, you cannot ensure that those mini mocks have questions that are representative of the set of questions (read the breath of topics) that you are likely to see on the GMAT. In the scenario that you have outlined, there is no way to prevent GMAT Prep from serving all Assumption and Strengthen questions in one of the mocks. In that case, will your accuracy be representative at all. Will you be able to track your improvement from one mini mock to another? Remember a lot of work goes in designing an ability quiz. You cannot simply put in a set of questions in a bucket, stir it and replace an ability quiz.


You Must Practice GMAT Prep questions but remember, these questions do not come with detailed solutions. Hence, they offer limited “Repeatable and Avoidable learning”. Repeatable and Avoidable learning points to learning that you can apply in other questions and mistakes that can avoid. While you may google for good solutions, you will not find those solutions outlined in a step by step methodical process.


Bottom Line


Understand that the original intent of Scholaranium is to help you reach 80% to 90% sectional abilities and maintain the same. Use the Original questions, Amazing solutions, and the Rich analytics for the same. Try GMAT Prep questions once you get there.

Are some of the questions slightly more difficult – Yes. Yes, but ever so slightly. This has been designed to ensure the consistency in your GMAT Prep results. Think of Scholaranium as equivalent to Army training. Is it a bit more difficult than the real battle – YES. Does it ensure that you do well on the BATTLE – YOU BET.
Lastly – Scholarnaium is a Mock Test Preparation Tool, not a Mock Test Replacement Tool. It’s helps improve your score a lot faster and ensures that it stays there consistently.

This is one reason why you see very few students saying that they scored well on Scholaranium Ability quizzes yet did not do well on the test – Very few compared to the number of students who say that they did well on GMAT Prep or other mocks but could not replicate the performance on the real GMAT.

I hope the above helps.

-Rajat Sadana


Rajat, thank you for pitching in and I agree with all your points. I still maintain that scholaranium question collection is top notch (as I wrote in my debriefl).

I definitely became more confident in CR and SC because of scholaranium (and this was the reason why I was not happy to see 42 in SC in the GMAT!). Scholaranium and question pack 1 need to work in tandem.

The method I had employed was as follows: you solve some questions from question pack 1, analyse your mistakes, go back to eGMAT verbal prep videos, follow up the videos by doing some targeted practice from scholaranium (try to reach for 70-80% accuracy with mixed set of questions, almost all easy correct, 70-80% medium and hard question correct). Repeat this until you give an ability quiz in scholaranium and obtain ability score (total) of 70-80, with sectional abilities reaching 70-80 each. This will show you that you are making progress and going in the right direction.

Also, when I talk about "mini mocks" , these are more to make your mind accustomed to be sharp for conditions that will be "similar" to exam conditions. In no way, you can extrpolate your actual scores based on these "mini mocks". I did these just to keep my mind running for 75 minutes at a given time. You still need to give GMATPREP CATs in actual/exam like conditions (with AWA and IR), full 4 hour engagement.

Hope this clears the confusion.
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New post 02 Sep 2015, 11:06
egmat wrote:
Guys, when you think about using Scholaranium, you have to understand The Intent with which the tool is created. The primary purpose of the tool is to provide you your individual sectional abilities. This means, that as soon as you finish studying for one particular section, you get a realistic evaluation of your abilities. The tool does exceptionally well in this regard. We have hundreds of score reports. Note, our goal is to be within 10 percentile points of accuracy and for 80%+ of the data points that we have, we are within 7 percentile.

Now, you may say (especially those of you who are engineers) why not aim for a better match. Quite simply, because you cannot. Even GMAC says that your performance on the test day can vary as much as 28 points. This variation is due to external factors such as your mental state of mind, a match up between your individual strengths and the kind of questions that you get on the GMAT.

Let me give you a few examples of the latter, which is also an illustration of the extent to which luck plays a role.

Take a look at this debrief: from-a-zero-to-710-to-770-my-journey-in-achieving-the-unexpected-203223.html

This student – Anuj – scored V35 in his first attempt and V44 during his second attempt. During his first attempt (V35) Anuj received 4 passages – all in humanities – an area that he is not so comfortable with. However, in his second attempt, he received 4 science passages, and was able to breeze through them. Now, had he scored V44 in his second attempt or V35 in his first attempt had the sequence of nature of passages been reversed – probably not. Does it mean that GMAT is inaccurate in how it evaluates individuals? Not a lot? Is it Absolutely Precise – No.

Take a look at his video interview here: https://e-gmat.wistia.com/medias/dnh1fg5yto

The second case is even more baffling. Attached (below) is the score report of a student who scored V34 despite scoring 0 percentile (yes Zero percentile) on Reading Comprehension. There is a school of thought that says that you must do well in RC to score 700 (see one of Sandeep Gupta’s promotional videos). Here is evidence of someone doing not poorly but pathetically (actually it’s a degree lower than pathetic since you cannot go lower) and still scoring 700.

Image

What should you infer from these data points?

My reason for citing these examples is not to state that the GMAT is an imprecise exam. In fact, it is one of the most accurate tests of your corresponding ability. My intent is purely to illustrate that there are outliers in every scenario and it’s very dangerous to generalize outliers. Imagine, someone inferring from the score report above that you don’t need to study RC to score a V34. I can tell you that 95 out of 100 times, you will not be able to replicate the performance.

@Engr – your case more of an exception than a norm and using the reasons above (especially after looking at Anuj’s case) you should be able to justify the same.
Similarly, we have examples of students who have scored 78 percentile in ability quizzes and have not been able to score as much on the real test.

I understand that it’s very tempting to generalize using anecdotal scenarios, but doing so is very dangerous, potentially catastrophic. Generalizations should be made based on representative samples and in our case, the samples include thousands of data points. Just to tell you the extent of the # of data points – We will get ~2M page views this month which is comparable what GMAT Club receives on the Verbal and Quant forums. This is despite the fact that 80% of our content is videos and videos only register a single PageView (even though each of our video is about 10 page views). Now lets look at some of your other statements:


Quote:
Strange thing was that I had 6 incorrect out of 30 and all of them were hard. So getting a 72 didn’t make sense.


Actually this makes complete sense. Let’s see why – First of all, you made mistakes in all hard questions and since you are a bright guy, it tells you that
a) the classification of question is precise and
b) the six questions that you got wrong probably indicated a couple of areas that you were weak in.

Now, would you get 6 questions from those areas on the actual test – Probably Not. Did it illustrate a worst case scenario – probably yes.

Similarly, in your case, you score a V41, V42 before your test, indicating that you are constantly improving and that you Peaked on the test. (Good for you :) )

Quote:
I stopped taking individual sections once I reached 80-90 ability in SC and CR. I redid a couple of individual ability quizzes to make sure that I did not fall for the same traps. This was an important step for me.


This is Absolutely Perfect. This was the original intent of the tool and illustrates how the tool should be used. Note, you used the tool to reach to a point and then maintain your performance. Really Good Use.


Your Advice – Skip Scholaranium and focus on GMAT Prep


Quote:
Additionally, download GMATPREP collection from all-gmatprep-questions-verbal-quant-194907.html#p1503956 and solve the questions. There is no susbtitute for official questions. Again, you can time yourself for sets of 37 and 41 questions respectively for Q and V sections. This way you will get timed mini mocks.


Your advice can be misconstrued. Here is why – Most People will read this and completely skip Scholaranium. Remember, you did this only after you reached 80% to 90% ability in each of the sections. Most students will not take this into context while applying the above (trust me when I say that. We respond to 150 emails every day and see such examples).


Secondly, while you may create mini mocks based on GMAT Prep, you cannot ensure that those mini mocks have questions that are representative of the set of questions (read the breath of topics) that you are likely to see on the GMAT. In the scenario that you have outlined, there is no way to prevent GMAT Prep from serving all Assumption and Strengthen questions in one of the mocks. In that case, will your accuracy be representative at all. Will you be able to track your improvement from one mini mock to another? Remember a lot of work goes in designing an ability quiz. You cannot simply put in a set of questions in a bucket, stir it and replace an ability quiz.


You Must Practice GMAT Prep questions but remember, these questions do not come with detailed solutions. Hence, they offer limited “Repeatable and Avoidable learning”. Repeatable and Avoidable learning points to learning that you can apply in other questions and mistakes that can avoid. While you may google for good solutions, you will not find those solutions outlined in a step by step methodical process.


Bottom Line


Understand that the original intent of Scholaranium is to help you reach 80% to 90% sectional abilities and maintain the same. Use the Original questions, Amazing solutions, and the Rich analytics for the same. Try GMAT Prep questions once you get there.

Are some of the questions slightly more difficult – Yes. Yes, but ever so slightly. This has been designed to ensure the consistency in your GMAT Prep results. Think of Scholaranium as equivalent to Army training. Is it a bit more difficult than the real battle – YES. Does it ensure that you do well on the BATTLE – YOU BET.
Lastly – Scholarnaium is a Mock Test Preparation Tool, not a Mock Test Replacement Tool. It’s helps improve your score a lot faster and ensures that it stays there consistently.

This is one reason why you see very few students saying that they scored well on Scholaranium Ability quizzes yet did not do well on the test – Very few compared to the number of students who say that they did well on GMAT Prep or other mocks but could not replicate the performance on the real GMAT.

I hope the above helps.

-Rajat Sadana



Thats a really good analytical explanation. Really appreciate your inputs here.

One more doubt: As I mentioned, I have exhausted my tests and my actual GMAT is 10 days away.
On Scolaranium:
SC ability is 75+
CR and RC are yet to be attempted
Would you suggest individual ability quizzes for CR and RC or should I look them together in Verbal ability quizzes along with SC. I am considering the 2nd option because of the time constraint that I have. On an added note, I have been having high accuracy (80+) in OG and GMATPrep for CR and RC.
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New post 02 Sep 2015, 11:28
Engr2012 - I understand your intent. I know that you have used the tool really well and I really appreciate that you are responding to the questions posted on Scholaranium. Trust me, I want to get to these questions and hopefully from next month I will. On another note, we still have our call pending and someone should reach out to you. Lets talk then.

popov - Take individual ability quizzes first. You want to get an unbiased estimate of your ability. Also you want to get the best estimate of your ability. Hence, revise a few CR questions to warm up your mind before taking the CR ability quiz. Take a break and then repeat the same and take the RC ability Quiz.
After that, if your CR and RC ability scores are 65% of higher, take the Verbal Ability Quiz.

I hope this helps.

-Rajat
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New post 02 Sep 2015, 21:07
I am excited to see this post so active and to have a clearer understanding on this matters.
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New post 25 Aug 2016, 17:20
Announcing GMAT Planner

A number of you have been asking how to interpret the ability scores that you get in Scholaranium. We have developed a tool called GMAT Planner to help you do that. Take it out for a spin:

[b]GMAT Planner serves two functions[/b]

1. Helps define your GMAT strategy: Did you ever wonder what Quant and Verbal score should you aim for? Have you thought about whether you score should be Quant drive or Verbal driven or in how many possible ways can you score 700 on GMAT? GMAT Planner helps you make this decision. The tool gives an initial recommendation, which you can customize. What's the benefit - you segment your time well, improve a lot faster, and modulate your studies accordingly, if you start with a target Quant and target Verbal score/

2. Helps define what combination of ability scores lead to a certain scaled score: Lets say to score 710, you decide that you need a V35. What Sentence Correction, Critical Reasoning, and Reading Comprehension ability should you aim for to score V35. How can you personalize this if you are say if you are exceptionally good in Sentence Correction and not as great in Critical Reasoning. GMAT Planner allows you to do that.

How did we build GMAT Planner?

We collected 500+ Enhanced Score Reports from our students, applied a bunch of algorithms, and tried to get to the numbers. Now, how accurate is GMAT Planner. There is a 98% correlation on average between the data that the tool generates and that in 1000+ Enhanced score reports (we collected 500 additional once the tool was in design phase). So I would say pretty close.

Click the link below to take the took out for a spin:

https://gmatplanner.e-gmat.com/

Help Video: https://e-gmat.wistia.com/medias/zlon76cwe8
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New post 03 Jul 2018, 20:43
egmat wrote:
Dear Qjones818,

I just checked the Scholaranium and found that many of our students are at 80% ability level. Their ability calculation in GMAT Prep is also similar. What is your CR ability as per GMAT Prep. Each CR question has had at least 200 attempts. Usually, we get a pretty good idea once we have 100 or more attempts on a particular question (90% confidence interval). In the skill data screen, did you see an particular area in CR in which you had to work on.

Regards,

Rajat Sadana

What is the indication of Ability quizzes. Suppose person is getting 60% in ability quiz of SC, what does it suggest? In entire verbal ability quiz if person is getting 80%, how will you match this score to predict one's GMAT verbal score ?
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