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In contrast to the ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the

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In contrast to the ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Dec 2018, 18:20
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In contrast to the ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the United States trade deficit with Mexico declined by $500 million as a result of record exports to that country.


(A) In contrast to the ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the United States trade deficit with Mexico declined by $500 million as a result of record
exports to that country.
This is the correct answer. Trade imbalance of US with China & Japan is logically compared to trade deficit of US with Mexico.
(B) In contrast to ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the United States sold record exports to Mexico, reducing its trade deficit by $500 million.
Illogical comparison between trade imbalances with China and Japan and the US is made. Thus is incorrect. We should either compare trade deficit with trade
deficit or one country with another.
(C) When compared with ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the United States sold record exports to Mexico, reducing their trade deficit by $500
million.
Same mistake as in option B. Illogical comparison between trade imbalances with China and Japan and the US is made. In addition compared with is incorrect
here. Compared with is used for showing differences between two entities. Here we are comparing similarities in trade deficit of US with China & Japan to
that of Mexico.
(D) Compared with ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the United States sold record exports to Mexico, reducing the trade deficit by $500 million.
Same mistake as in option B. Illogical comparison between trade imbalances with China and Japan and the US is made.
(E) Compared to the ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the United States record exports to Mexico caused a $500 million decline in trade deficit with
that country.
Same mistake as in option B. Illogical comparison between trade imbalances with China and Japan and the US is made.
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Re: In contrast to the ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Dec 2018, 23:28
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Fight Between A & E

In contrast to- means, there should be a contrast

Quote:
A) In contrast to the ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan-
either trade deficit or surplus. it should be the other one between mexico and USA.

Quote:
E) Compared to the ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan


Compared to- comparison should be between same thing-(Trade surplus or trade deficit).

If you consider Trade imbalances as Trade deficit than, you should use compare to. E is correct.
If you consider Trade imbalances as Trade surplus than, you should use In contrast to. A is correct.
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Re: In contrast to the ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jun 2019, 21:08
GMATNinja wrote:
HKD1710 wrote:
Why is there no " 'S " in choice A --- "the United State's trade deficit" (please notice " 's ").

Please help on this.

It would definitely be wrong to write "the United State's" here, since the country's full name is "the United States" with an "s" on the end. (Similar: if we're trying to say that some weirdo named Charles has a huge appetite, it would be wrong to refer to "Charle's huge appetite.")

Beyond that: well, there's some grey area with the possessive here, but it's completely irrelevant on the GMAT. The GMAT will never test you on the correct placement of an apostrophe for a possessive noun that already ends in "s." The GMAT really doesn't care if you'd write "Charles's amazing appetite" (correct), "Charles' amazing appetite" (often considered incorrect a generation ago, but generally accepted now), or "Charle's amazing appetite" (definitely wrong). The test has more important things to worry about.

If we're talking about the trade deficit of the United States, though, we have a funny habit of omitting the apostrophe completely. I'm not sure why we do that, to be honest. We would talk about "Mexico's economy" (with an apostrophe to indicate that "Mexico" is possessive) or "the Mexican economy" (with "Mexican" functioning as an adjective), but we tend to just say "the United States economy" or "the United States trade deficit." Technically, an apostrophe would be fine for those last two, but we tend to omit it.

But again: this isn't anything to worry about, since it's not ever going to be a deciding factor on a GMAT question.

I hope this helps!


Hi GMAT Ninja,

Can you throw some light on why in E. the comparison between trade imbalances and United states record exports incorrect? Is it because logically trade imbalances must be compared with trade imbalances/deficit in comparison to exports?
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Re: In contrast to the ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jul 2019, 17:04
nishatfarhat87 wrote:

Hi GMAT Ninja,

Can you throw some light on why in E. the comparison between trade imbalances and United states record exports incorrect? Is it because logically trade imbalances must be compared with trade imbalances/deficit in comparison to exports?


Quote:
(E) Compared to the ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the United States record exports to Mexico caused a $500 million decline in trade deficit with that country.

If I'm interpreting your post correctly, you have the right idea: we can't compare "the ongoing trade imbalances..." with "the United States record exports to Mexico" because exports aren't actually a type of trade imbalance! Answer choice (A) compares "the ongoing trade imbalances..." with "the United States trade deficit..." Much clearer.

I hope this helps!
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Re: In contrast to the ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2019, 18:53
daagh wrote:
It is common that the trade deficit of a particular country with another country will shrink when exports to that another country go up. Here the exporter is the US and the importer is Mexico. Therefore, exports to 'that' country will only mean exports to Mexico; After all, can the US have a trade deficit with itself?


Hello daagh,

Would also like to know if 'selling exports' is a correct phrase. Shouldnt it be 'exporting' only ?
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In contrast to the ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2019, 21:38
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Hi
As you say, after all, "sold exports' or 'selling exports' are mentioned in B,C, and D which are also wrong chocies, probably becuase they are not correct expressions. But the primary reason are the faulty comparisons.
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In contrast to the ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Dec 2019, 12:16
daagh egmat
GMATNinja

I feel declined is a v-ed modifier not a verb



Per egmat litus test

lfthe Supect of the senlence ls the "doer' of the action presented by
the Verb-ed fom, then the Verb form is the verb of the sentence.


Here, subject of this main clause is deficit wich is not the doer of action declined. Deficit cant decline itself.

How is this not a run-on sentence ?

Kindly guide.


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Re: In contrast to the ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Dec 2019, 08:51
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Hi Shank

Quote:
In contrast to the ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the United States trade deficit with Mexico declined by $500 million as a result of record exports to that country.

(A) In contrast to the ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the United States trade deficit with Mexico declined by $500 million as a result of record exports to that country.

(B) In contrast to ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the United States sold record exports to Mexico, reducing its trade deficit by $500 million.

(C) When compared with ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the United States sold record exports to Mexico, reducing their trade deficit by $500 million.

(D) Compared with ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the United States sold record exports to Mexico, reducing the trade deficit by $500 million.

(E) Compared to the ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the United States record exports to Mexico caused a $500 million decline in trade deficit with that country.


Your contention is that since the US is not the doer of the comparison, 'declined' is not a verb but a past participle modifier, and hence the US cannot be the modifyee.

1. One set of verbs involves direct action such as sing, jump, swim etc. The subject is the doer of the action. They are called the action verbs.

2. Then there are another set of nouns, which are called 'the linking verbs'. Their function is simply to link the subject with the rest of the predicate.


1. He appeared nervous when he entered the exam hall.
Did he do anything to appear nervous?

2. Attracting everybody's attention, the Jumbo-sized Watermelon fetched the highest bid.
Did the fruit do anything to attract the attention?

3. Then there are another set called the status verbs just to indicate the state of being of the subject.
In all these cases, the subject is not the doer of the action

Let's look at another kind of 'status' verbs.

1. Born in India, several people immigrated to the US with no intention of returning to the motherland.
Here the subject 'people' are not the doers of the function of 'being born." Still the modification is all right.

2. Situated on top of the Tirumala hills, Tirupathi is a great religious center of India.
Do the Tirupathi hills do anything to be modifies by the word situated?

3. Dried on the sunny open terrace, the cloths are ready for ironing.
Do the clothes do anything for drying?

Please also take another hint. A modifier in the middle of a sentence will mostly be separated by a comma from the previous part, But, a verb will not be separated. If not preceded by a comma, it may still be a modifier modifying the noun before. However, in the given context it doesn't hold any sense to say Mexico declined.

Therefore, please rest assured that 'declined' is the verb of the noun 'trade deficit' and not a modifier.

Your query--How is this not a run-on sentence? I hope you are referring to choice A.
(A) In contrast to the ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan, the United States trade deficit with Mexico declined by $500 million as a result of record exports to that country.
In contrast to the ongoing trade imbalances with China and Japan-- a prepositional modifier.
the United States trade deficit with Mexico declined by $500 million as a result of record exports to that country. -- This is the main clause.
This is a simple sentence with only one clause in it. Therefore, there is no question of a run-on.

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