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Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices show

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Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices show  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jun 2017, 14:03
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Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices shown above.If Kim bought the same total number of roses and daisies as Sue,was the price of Kim's purchase of roses and daisies higher than the price of Sue's purchase of roses and daisies?

(1) Kim bought twice as many daisies as roses
(2) Kim bought 4 more roses than Sue bought


Attachment:
2018.OG.06.339.q.jpg
2018.OG.06.339.q.jpg [ 10.47 KiB | Viewed 6955 times ]

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Re: Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices show  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Nov 2017, 06:46
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AbdurRakib wrote:
Image
Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices shown above.If Kim bought the same total number of roses and daisies as Sue,was the price of Kim's purchase of roses and daisies higher than the price of Sue's purchase of roses and daisies?

(1) Kim bought twice as many daisies as roses
(2) Kim bought 4 more roses than Sue bought


Attachment:
2018.OG.06.339.q.jpg



hi,

two things - roses and daisies - are involved, in which roses cost more than daisies.
Now K and S purchase same number of flowers (roses and daisies).

so since the roses cost more, anyone who has purchased MORE roses as compared to the other will have spent more money..

let's see the statements..

(1) Kim bought twice as many daisies as roses
nothing about what S has bought..
If S purchased say equal number of roses and daisies, S spent more
If S purchased say THRICE as many daisies as roses, K spent more as he bought more roses as compared to K
Insuff

(2) Kim bought 4 more roses than Sue bought
This is what we were looking for.
so K bought 4 more roses, thus spent 4*(1-0.5)=$2 more
suff

B
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Re: Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices show  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Dec 2017, 13:30
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Kim -> a (no of roses) + b (no of daises)
Sue -> c (no of roses) + d (no of daises)

given: \(a + b = c + d\) (as kim and sue bought same total number of flowers)
question: \(a + 0.5 * b > c + 0.5 * d\) ?
=> \(2a + b > 2c + d\) ? (multiplied by 2)
=> \(a + a + b > 2c + d\) ?
=> \(a + c + d > 2c + d\) (as \(a + b = c + d\))
=> \(a > c\) ?
question is simplified: Did kim bought more number of roses than sue bought ?

Statement 1: Kim bought twice as many daisies as roses
=> \(b = 2a\) , but we want to find if \(a > c\) ? no idea about sue => InSufficient

Statement 2: Kim (\(a\)) bought 4 more roses than Sue (\(c\)) bought => directly answers our simplified question = Answer (B)
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Re: Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices show  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jun 2017, 14:24
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From the question stem we are able to get the cost/flower
Rose - 1$ and Daisies - 0.5$
Given the sum of roses and daisies bought by Kim and Sue are the same.

(1) Kim bought twice as many daisies as rose
If the number of roses bought by Kim is x, the number of daisies she bought are 2x
Total number of flowers bought is 3x
Since we have absolutely no idea bout which flowers Sue bought, this statement alone is not sufficient.

(2) Kim bought 4 more roses than Sue bought
If Sue bought x roses, Kim bought x+4 roses.
If the total number of flowers they bought are y,
Sue bought y-x daisies and Kim bought y-x-4 daisies
Since the total flowers bought by both of them is the same,
we can clearly tell that the flowers cost Kim 2$ higher overall. Sufficient (Option B)
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Re: Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices show  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jul 2017, 06:30
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B.

We want to know if Kim's total purchase is greater than that of Sue's.

Given: Kim and Sue bought the same total number of flowers.
Price of roses is higher than that of daisies.

Task: In order for Kim's total purchase to be greater than Sue's, either:
a. Kim bought more roses than did Kim.
b. Kim bought fewer daisies than did Kim.

(1) Kim bought twice as many daisies as roses
We do not know about the number of roses Sue bought, thus we cannot know if Sue bought more roses than Kim or not. INSUFFICIENT
(2) Kim bought 4 more roses than Sue bought
Situation a. above. SUFFICIENT.
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Re: Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices show  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jul 2017, 04:29
can anyone please solve statement B
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Re: Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices show  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Aug 2017, 01:23
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Leo8 wrote:
can anyone please solve statement B


The primary thing to understand here is that the person who buys more roses than the other will have a higher purchase cost. For example, say Kim has 2 extra roses, and given the fact that both of them have equal number of flower, therefore, Sue will have 2 lesser roses, (i.e.) 2 more daisies. In the end, Kim's purchase is $1 more than Sue's.

Statement 1:

No information is given about Sue, so INSUFFICIENT.

Statement 2:

Kim has 4 more roses, therefore, Sue has 4 daisies in that place and hence the net is $4 (Kim) - $2 (Roses) = $2.
Kim's purchase will always be $2 more than Sue's.
SUFFICIENT.

OPTION (B)

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Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices show  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 05 Sep 2017, 00:08
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From the question Stem:

Kim paid: a + \(\frac{b}{2}\) $ (a and b are number of roses and daises Kim bought respectively)
Sue paid: c + \(\frac{d}{2}\) $ (c and d are number of roses and daises Sue bought respectively)

a+b = c+d

was the price of Kim's purchase of roses and daisies higher than the price of Sue's purchase of roses and daisies meaning did Kim pay more than Sue?
so a + \(\frac{b}{2}\) > c + \(\frac{d}{2}\) ?
or 2a + b > 2c + d?

because a+b = c+d, so we can reduce both sides to get a>c?
If we know the relationship between a and c, we can answer the question.

Statement 1: b = 2a. No c, so INSUFF
Statement2: a-c=4. SUFF

Answer is B

Originally posted by NamVu1990 on 25 Aug 2017, 01:39.
Last edited by NamVu1990 on 05 Sep 2017, 00:08, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices show  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Nov 2017, 12:44
AbdurRakib wrote:
Image
Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices shown above.If Kim bought the same total number of roses and daisies as Sue,was the price of Kim's purchase of roses and daisies higher than the price of Sue's purchase of roses and daisies?

(1) Kim bought twice as many daisies as roses
(2) Kim bought 4 more roses than Sue bought


Attachment:
2018.OG.06.339.q.jpg


Since they bought the same total number of flowers, and roses are more expensive than daisies per flower, the person who purchased more roses spent more money than the other person.
So, the question becomes this: Did Kim purchase more roses than Sue did? If yes, then Kim spent more money than Sue did. If not, then Kim spent less money than Sue did.

Statement One Alone:
Kim bought twice as many daisies as roses.

Even though we know that Kim bought twice as many daisies as roses, we don’t know anything about the number of roses and the number of daisies Sue bought. Thus, we can’t tell who bought
more roses. Statement one alone is not sufficient.

Statement Two Alone:

Kim bought 4 more roses than Sue bought.

Since Kim bought more roses than Sue did, she also spent more money on the flowers than Sue did. Statement two alone is sufficient.

Answer: B
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Re: Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices show  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2018, 02:45
hellosanthosh2k2 wrote:
Kim -> a (no of roses) + b (no of daises)
Sue -> c (no of roses) + d (no of daises)

given: \(a + b = c + d\) (as kim and sue bought same total number of flowers)
question: \(a + 0.5 * b > c + 0.5 * d\) ?
=> \(2a + b > 2c + d\) ? (multiplied by 2)
=> \(a + a + b > 2c + d\) ?
=> \(a + c + d > 2c + d\) (as \(a + b = c + d\))
=> \(a > c\) ?
question is simplified: Did kim bought more number of roses than sue bought ?

Statement 1: Kim bought twice as many daisies as roses
=> \(b = 2a\) , but we want to find if \(a > c\) ? no idea about sue => InSufficient

Statement 2: Kim (\(a\)) bought 4 more roses than Sue (\(c\)) bought => directly answers our simplified question = Answer (B)



Could anyone please explain this step? Why has 0.5 been multiplied with b and d?

\(a + 0.5 * b > c + 0.5 * d\) ?
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Re: Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices show  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jul 2018, 01:20
101mba101 wrote:
hellosanthosh2k2 wrote:
Kim -> a (no of roses) + b (no of daises)
Sue -> c (no of roses) + d (no of daises)

given: \(a + b = c + d\) (as kim and sue bought same total number of flowers)
question: \(a + 0.5 * b > c + 0.5 * d\) ?
=> \(2a + b > 2c + d\) ? (multiplied by 2)
=> \(a + a + b > 2c + d\) ?
=> \(a + c + d > 2c + d\) (as \(a + b = c + d\))
=> \(a > c\) ?
question is simplified: Did kim bought more number of roses than sue bought ?

Statement 1: Kim bought twice as many daisies as roses
=> \(b = 2a\) , but we want to find if \(a > c\) ? no idea about sue => InSufficient

Statement 2: Kim (\(a\)) bought 4 more roses than Sue (\(c\)) bought => directly answers our simplified question = Answer (B)



Could anyone please explain this step? Why has 0.5 been multiplied with b and d?

\(a + 0.5 * b > c + 0.5 * d\) ?


that is the price per unit of daisies.
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Re: Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices show  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jul 2018, 03:18
thefibonacci wrote:
101mba101 wrote:
hellosanthosh2k2 wrote:
Kim -> a (no of roses) + b (no of daises)
Sue -> c (no of roses) + d (no of daises)

given: \(a + b = c + d\) (as kim and sue bought same total number of flowers)
question: \(a + 0.5 * b > c + 0.5 * d\) ?
=> \(2a + b > 2c + d\) ? (multiplied by 2)
=> \(a + a + b > 2c + d\) ?
=> \(a + c + d > 2c + d\) (as \(a + b = c + d\))
=> \(a > c\) ?
question is simplified: Did kim bought more number of roses than sue bought ?

Statement 1: Kim bought twice as many daisies as roses
=> \(b = 2a\) , but we want to find if \(a > c\) ? no idea about sue => InSufficient

Statement 2: Kim (\(a\)) bought 4 more roses than Sue (\(c\)) bought => directly answers our simplified question = Answer (B)



Could anyone please explain this step? Why has 0.5 been multiplied with b and d?

\(a + 0.5 * b > c + 0.5 * d\) ?


that is the price per unit of daisies.



Oh ok. Thanks! I got very confused with the question and missed out on that part.
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Re: Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices show  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jul 2018, 04:41
AbdurRakib wrote:
Image
Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices shown above.If Kim bought the same total number of roses and daisies as Sue,was the price of Kim's purchase of roses and daisies higher than the price of Sue's purchase of roses and daisies?

(1) Kim bought twice as many daisies as roses
(2) Kim bought 4 more roses than Sue bought


Attachment:
2018.OG.06.339.q.jpg



Let the total # of roses & daises bought be 10.

Let Kim buy "x" roses & hence she will buy (10 - x) daisies

Let Sue buy "y" roses & hence she will buy (10 - y) daisies

Purchase of Kim = x + 0.5*(10 - x) & Purchase of Sue = y + 0.5*(10 - y)

Question:is x + 0.5*(10 - x) > y + 0.5*(10 - y)?

Simplified to, is x > y ?



Statement 1: Kim bought twice as many daisies as roses. No information about Sue's purchase.

Statement 1 alone is Not Sufficient.


Statement 2: Kim bought 4 more roses than Sue. x = y + 4.

Hence x > y

Statement 2 is Sufficient.



Answer B.



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Re: Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices show  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jul 2018, 07:49
sue spent R+.5D

1. Kim spent r+r=2r; count R+D=3r
Total count divisible by 3
Kim spent 2/3(R+D)
Is 2/3(R+D) > R+D/2?
1/6D > 1/3R?
D > 2R?
Example:
D=2; R=1; sue spent $2; Kim spent $2
D=7; R=2; sue spent $5.5; Kim spent $6
Insufficient

2. r=R+4
d=R+D-R-4=D-4
Kim spent R+4+.5(D-4)=R+.5D+2
$2 more than sue
Sufficient

Answer B
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Re: Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices show  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2018, 11:02
AbdurRakib wrote:
Image
Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices shown above.If Kim bought the same total number of roses and daisies as Sue,was the price of Kim's purchase of roses and daisies higher than the price of Sue's purchase of roses and daisies?

(1) Kim bought twice as many daisies as roses
(2) Kim bought 4 more roses than Sue bought


Attachment:
2018.OG.06.339.q.jpg



If Kim bought the same total number of roses and daisies as Sue and if Kim bought 4 more roses than Sue bought, its quite logical that option B is sufficient :)
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Re: Kim and Sue each bought some roses and some daisies at the prices show &nbs [#permalink] 17 Aug 2018, 11:02
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